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Bullied kids punished

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  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Even if teachers do intervene, all that happens is that you get bullied for being a chicken and telling the teachers. That's what happened in my case, in the younger years.

    I found this as well. In Year 12, this happened as well. I grassed some people up for what my tutor said was sexual harrassment. She then told the Head of 6th Form (I think this is standard procedure, but am not sure) who spoke to me and told me to write down what had happened then she'd phone my parents if I wanted her to and she'd let me know what is likely to happen with the bullies.

    So anyway, she had a word with the people this involved and their friends (who claimed to be mine as well:rolleyes: ) who ended up having a go at me for grassing them up and for supposedly getting them into trouble.

    I remember one of them having a go at me because I told my dad instead of telling my mum.:yeees:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Loopi wrote: »
    I thought that all teachers did this as a matter of course. If they don't, then they're in the wrong profession.

    Have you met all teachers then? A fair few I knew at my school were timid of certain groups of students, and one even got bullied herself to an extent (by students!). No, not all teachers reassure you, they just say it will go away if you ignore it. And don't bother coming back unless you go and talk to them again.
    Again, I figured that all teachers did this. As for it stopping the bully, I've seen varied results.

    What, every teacher uses their initiative to combat bullying rather than just the generic 'ok, I'll write it up, don't worry, they'll get bored'. Ok then.
    And again, I can't believe that any teacher would walk past and ignore this IF they heard. When you're focused on getting your photocopying done before next lesson, it's amazing how much you don't notice anything else going on around you.

    I think in my case they assumed I was enjoying it or we were friends or something. I can't speak for everyone, it was just one example of teachers having 'more important things to do' than deal with bullies. After all, that's down to the students at the end of the day isn't it?
    Clearly ShyBoy you should go into teaching. It's obvious that you'd be much better than most of those in the profession at the minute. There'd never be a bullying problem with you around.

    Less of the cyncism please, I got bullied - a hell of a lot of people got bullied - I saw that the teachers could have helped reduce it, but a lot of them were too worried about losing their to do anything it seems (according to what you've said). I wasn't attacking all teachers, just the ones who don't provide the care that they should - that their students should be able to learn in a safe and supportive environment. Being a teacher is a demanding job where they must be pro-active, rather than simply reactive and relying on what they've been told to do.

    Have you ever noticed if there's a confrontation, it's usually the same 2 / 3 teachers who calm it down or take action, whilst the rest look on and gossip between themselves. (and really, using the excuse you'll get sued is petty; teachers get paid to look after and teach students, if they're not looking after them properly then they're not doing their job).

    No need for the attitude tho.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Generally teachers that i've dealt with have been shit at sorting out bullying. One of my teachers said she didn't stop me and my mates causing trouble cos we intimidated her and she was scared. Fuckin moose. How can they sort out bullying when no one respects them?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I did have an issue wityh the teachers not wanting to know when I was bullied in comp, which did hapen quite often as i was/am a big person( or fat if i'm being honest :) )

    a girl in the year above me decided one day she didn't like me as I wouldn't move from where I was talking with my friends on a playground and she wanted to stand there. She punched me full force in the face and I just stood there and looked at her then walked off with my friends

    Usual bullying took place then for a while, name calling, taunts etc.

    a few days later her and a gang of about 10 other from her year and my year decided it would be fun to pick me up and throw me down a hill (at the back of our school were some very big grass hills)

    This resulted in me holding on to a nearby fence and refusing to let go as i wasn't giving them the justification of seeing me tumble down a hill (never mind the justification of seeing me doing bugger all about it!)

    One of the boys kept telling me then that if I didn't let go of the fence he was going to bash my brains in with a brick and make me let go

    In the end they only let go as they knew that some of the other kids had run to my house to get my dad who would have quite cheerfully hit this bloke as he was a local troubvle maker anyway

    The teachers didn't want to know anything about it and only had a word with the main instigators as my parents came to school and demanded to see someone and refused to leave until they saw them

    Luckily most of them dropped out early or left at the end of year 11 and my life returned to normal

    More should be done to punish the bullies and to support the victims rather than it being brushed under the carper
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Well it seems that they do want kids to take responsibility for their peers, new guidelines say that kids who stand up to bullies will be rewarded, and that what teachers can and can't do will by much clearer.

    Will it stop the bullying? I doubt it.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/6543921.stm

    Where students do not respect authority at all, how do you teach them that respect? Maybe their parents were too leniant on them. *shrug* I'm conjecturing, but my sister went off the rails because she was spoilt quite badly, and so thought she was entitled to everything and that teachers were below her. And you'll find a lot of parents reinforce this by telling the teacher off rather than their child, or telling the police off in some cases :|.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Another story by the bbc:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/6540557.stm

    saying that teachers are afraid of their pupils making false allegations.

    I'm glad I'm not at school now, teachers too scared to stand up to students who rule by fear, because if they do they might lose their job.

    So, the teachers get on with their job. The bullies have a whale of a time. It's still the victims who lose out unfortunately. And from the teachers I've spoken to (though by no means am I tarring them all with the same brush), some seem to shrug off the responsibility - they blame it on the parents, or the government, or that it's not their juristiction (i.e. if it happens at 3.15 school is 'closed' so tell the kids to call the police).

    Teachers should imho be in a position of responsibility over a child equal to that of a parent or a police officer.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ShyBoy wrote: »

    Teachers should imho be in a position of responsibility over a child equal to that of a parent or a police officer.

    Yes but unfortunately they're not!! If they were, my job would be a hell of a lot easier. ;)

    Please try not to mistake an 'inability to solve a situation' with 'apathy' on behalf of teachers (and anybody else who wants to do something but claims that they can't). The law prevents people intervening in certain situations remember. Shyboy (and others who may have been pissed off by what I've written so far!), I'm not defending teachers who don't intervene in bullying situations, I'm just explaining why many are reluctant to.

    Bullying is something that needs to be stopped and schools, parents and pupils need to work together to stop it. Without this kind of united effort, any scheme will most likely fail, as can be seen in schools across the country.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You're right, and I think teachers should be given whatever tools they need. If someone in the street smacks someone, a copper will jump on him for the safety of the victim. But in a school environment a teacher is not allowed to do that. But ask any parent who's children have been fighting, they'll happily pull them apart and give them a good bollocking.

    If a student accuses a teacher of sexual assualt or whatever, there should be a good amount of evidence that it was clearly innappropriate. If the said child has just been punching another child in the case then it probably wasn't innappopriate.

    The teacher got charged with assualt for lifting a girls chin and telling her to cheer up. Utterly, utterly ridiculous.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    So alot of the reasons teachers don't deal with bullies is because they can't and not because they just can't be bothered?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sofie wrote: »
    So alot of the reasons teachers don't deal with bullies is because they can't and not because they just can't be bothered?

    Yes ... in the case of the teachers that I've met anyway, which obviously isn't all of them. That's what I've been trying to explain throughout this thread but made a bit of a hash of it cos I was getting quite defensive. Typical eh? :blush:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ShyBoy wrote: »
    The teacher got charged with assualt for lifting a girls chin and telling her to cheer up. Utterly, utterly ridiculous.

    You what?!

    I remember one of my tutors telling me something along those lines - it was something along the lines not being able to hug students - even when they want to. (in a friendly non-sexual type way)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sofie wrote: »
    You what?!

    I remember one of my tutors telling me something along those lines - it was something along the lines not being able to hug students - even when they want to. (in a friendly non-sexual type way)

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/6540557.stm
    bbc wrote:
    Mr Bell was found guilty of a technical assault - he admitted touching the pupil under the chin when telling her to cheer up.

    :eek2:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Crikey!
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