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Way to make yourself stand out with a 2:2?

SystemSystem Posts: 8,583 Community Managers
Well basically, I'm going to get a 2:2 which is REALLY frustrating when I know I'm capable of a 2:1.

All of my assessed seminars this year have been graded as firsts/2:1s and 2/3 of my essays have come back as 2:1s (one was almost a first). In other words, I'm probably going to average out a 2:1 for this year.

In my 2nd year however, I had loads going on personally and I averaged a high third. I just completely fucked it up as I didn't care about Uni. As each year is worth 50/50 and the way they work out your classification here, I'm going to get a 2:2. It doesn't even matter if I get straight 2:1s this year :grump: Still, I'll be happy knowing I got all 2:1s in the final year, knowing I tried my best and what not.

Thing is, will employers judge me for having a 2:2? I mean, no employer is going to listen to me ramble about how I had problems in the 2nd year! They will probably just think I didn't put the effort in!

I suppose I'm just worrying a bit and I'm just wondering how I can make myself stand out on my CV and on application forms. I mean, I'm hoping that having a Law degree will help me stand out more than someone with a mickey mouse degree but I don't know :(

I'm wanting to sort out my CV very soon as I'm finishing Uni in the next few months so will be applying for jobs and what not. I don't want employers just assuming though that because I have a 2:2, I'm lazy. I genuinely did have problems in the 2nd year and I'm working really hard now and getting 2:1s.

I don't want the fact that I'm gonna have a 2:2 get in the way of me getting a decent job yanno? I have had lots of job experience since I was 16 but I haven't really joined any societies whilst I've been at Uni. My social life has involved drinking, shopping and err drinking :yeees:

Just wondering if anyone has got any tips to help me stand out a bit despite me having a 2:2. I have just got this horrible feeling that because I'm going to come out with a 2:2, Uni has been a waste of time. I don't know, I'm just beginning to think about it lots as I'm leaving in 3 months :nervous: I also keep getting really fucking angry at myself for letting my personal problems get in the way of me getting a good grade. I could have got a 2:1 :( Meh.
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Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Big up your job experience, big up your personnal skills, get the rest of your CV looking really good, concise, to the point etc. If you've done that well this year then you should get really good references which will help.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yup. Well I have lots of job experience. I'm not currently working though as I'm taking time off to concentrate on my course.

    I'm not sure how I should do my CV though because it has to be 2 pages at most and I've had 7 jobs since I was 16 :eek:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You need to aim your CV at the job you are applying for. This means that you don't necessarily need to include everything you have ever done but just jobs/experience relevant to what you are applying for. For example for some of the postgrad courses I've applied for I had to supply a CV, I've worked in BHS as a Christmas temp and as a shift manager in good old KFC for 1.5 years but I didn't include either of these on my CV because they mean nothing for the course I'm applying for.

    Like others have said, its a good idea to emphasise the experience you do already have and what you have learned from it. Well done for bringing your marks up this year, you've really been working hard :thumb:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'd also check out your degree classification in detail.

    For example my degree was judged 50:50 on the second and third years; however to obtain a 2:1 you needed half of the modules to be of 2:1 (60+) status and an average of 55+.

    Classification's vary from university to university and course to course, but it could be worth double checking.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    7 Jobs you can probably get onto a max of 10 lines!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Mich wrote: »
    I'd also check out your degree classification in detail.

    For example my degree was judged 50:50 on the second and third years; however to obtain a 2:1 you needed half of the modules to be of 2:1 (60+) status and an average of 55+.

    Classification's vary from university to university and course to course, but it could be worth double checking.

    I've checked.

    I know the way they work it out. I can't get a 2:1.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I understand your frustration and disappointment, but I don't think you need to worry yourself as much as you are. Employers will be impressed to see that you have a degree full stop. And look on the positive side, at least a 2:2 is better than a 3rd. It's a bit like when you get your GCSE's - Employers want to know about A-C grades, it doesn't matter if all of those happen to be C's not A's. (A rather useless analogy, I know, but err..).

    Just work hard to do as best as you know you can now to make sure you get the grade you're expecting. Get yourself a clean and consice CV drawn up that emphasises your skills/experience etc. and you'll be well on you're way. It's all about accentuating what you have, and blagging the rest, baby! :razz:

    Don't be too hard on yourself. It's a good thing that you've recognised you let slip last year (even if it wasn't your fault) and are determined to turn things around this year. :thumb:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Volunteer.
  • **helen****helen** Mod malarkist Posts: 9,235 Boards Champion
    Namaste wrote: »
    Volunteer.

    :yes: couldn't agree more - if you can volunteer within your chosen field it's by far one of the best ways to make your CV stand out.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I was gonna volunteer last year but I just didn't get round to it.

    Now, I just don't have the time. I've had to quit my paid job because I've got that much work to do.

    Also, I don't even know what my chosen field is. I'm studying Law but don't wanna work in Law anymore :(
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I was gonna volunteer last year but I just didn't get round to it.

    Now, I just don't have the time. I've had to quit my paid job because I've got that much work to do.

    Also, I don't even know what my chosen field is. I'm studying Law but don't wanna work in Law anymore :(

    Well for the moment I'd recommend concentrating on the last few months of your degree.

    If you don't know what sort of area you want to go into, that can be seen as a positive. You can use the time after graduation to sort yourself out, there's no rush. Don't expect to walk straight into a graduate level job (not saying you are but some people do). You can temp in a decentish paid job, maybe work a few part time jobs, volunteer one evening/Saturday afternoon, take up some hobbies and find out where your interests lie.

    The way I see it, you have all your life to be tied down to a job, so you may as well find something you are passionate about.

    I wouldn't worry about the 2:2. Unless you are going for graduate schemes or super competitive jobs it's not really an issue. Once you are out there working and meeting people face to face, they will see what you are capable of and after a few years in work no one cares what degree classification you have.

    Another alternative could be to get a job before you have your classification. I got my job before I knew what degree I had, they just asked me at interview what I thought I would get but didn't actually check as far as I know.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Spice it up with colouring in pencils?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yerascrote wrote: »
    Spice it up with colouring in pencils?

    :yes: it would certainly stand out

    :thumb:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I wish. CV's have to be black & white though :p
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    to an extent i wouldn't rely on your job experience - only if it is related to the area of work you want to go in or if it has given you the skills required in the jobs you're going to be applying for. i've only had 2 jobs since the age of 16, and been in the same one now for over 5 years. while this shows i've got longevity, it limits my skills somewhat. however i don't plan on doing shop/bar work when i graduate! volunteering is definately the best option - i did some over the summer but the people i volunteered for have been useless and it took them around 7 months to get it sorted and then when i did volunteer it wasn't what i wanted to do! so i wasted my time really when i could've been applying with other places.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I wish. CV's have to be black & white though :p

    They totally dont' - i wouldn't personally reccomend it but i've seen loads of people who have done really trendy CV's with colours and stuff - I'd obviously put them straight in the bin though...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Wyetry wrote: »
    They totally dont' - i wouldn't personally reccomend it but i've seen loads of people who have done really trendy CV's with colours and stuff - I'd obviously put them straight in the bin though...


    It does depend what sort of job you're after. If you were going for marketing/advertising or something creative, a slightly different CV could show off your skills and make you stand out. Wouldn't recommend it though for 90% of jobs. I like laughing at people's CVs...I'm mean though.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    PussyKatty wrote: »
    It does depend what sort of job you're after. If you were going for marketing/advertising or something creative, a slightly different CV could show off your skills and make you stand out. Wouldn't recommend it though for 90% of jobs. I like laughing at people's CVs...I'm mean though.


    Hehe, me too! :blush:

    Just a general point: make sure you also check, check and recheck your spelling, punctuation and grammar, and make sure your layout is bang on - no random tabs sticking out in all directions!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The best ones are the ones where they put a photo on. Fair enough if you're a model, but most people aren't. Still, it cheered me up no end when I worked for an HR company, we had a sweepstake on who got the ugliest applicant.

    You make yourself stand out with relevant job experience, either voluntary or paid, and to show that you have done other things other than study. A Desmond isn't the worst degree in the world, its what I got, and many grad schemes take on with a 2.2. The Civil Service FastTrack scheme takes on from a 2.2 upwards, and so do companies like Stagecoach.

    If you're wanting to work in the law you either get a training contract or you go and get experience. I've taken the experience route and I'm not doing so badly, though I could be doing a lot better.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    As Kermit says, it's not the end of the world. I got a 2:2 and I'm not doing so badly. I managed to get onto a competitive PGCE course at Brum Uni despite them saying that they wanted 2:1s and upwards.

    Since working, I did find that the top schools would just overlook me to begin with but now I have experience, that's what they focus on. In fact, I've just been approached by a private school and asked to work for them until the end of the summer term.

    My point is, that whilst you might not walk into a dream job, once you've got a couple of years experience, nobody will care what kind of degree you've got.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    depending on what field you want to work in you could always study masters.....or just lie? none of my employers have actually asked to see my degree certificate so in hindsight I could probably have blagged it..
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I agree, a masters is a good idea if you get a 2:2 and you want to do something competitive, like law. As long as you do WELL in the masters though.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    depending on what field you want to work in you could always study masters.....or just lie? none of my employers have actually asked to see my degree certificate so in hindsight I could probably have blagged it..

    Oh, I could never lie. If I got a job on the basis of having a 2:1 and they found out, I'd get the sack.

    I really don't wanna study a masters. I also don't have the money to do one.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    One thing you could do to make your CV look more impressive (although theres nothing wrong with a 2:2!), if you've got excellent module scores for your final year (as this is the most important year) is to state your overall degree score and then list your best module scores below this - this is even more siginificant if the module scores you post are relevant to the job you are applying for (so you can tailor your CV for different jobs if you need to).

    :)

    79
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I really don't wanna study a masters. I also don't have the money to do one.

    Are you still wanting to work in the legal field? If you are then a Desmond really isn't so bad, only the Magic Circle firms want the 2.1 or above, and i for one would rather eat my eyes with a spoon than work for them.

    How important your degree is depends on what your ambitions are. I've got a 2.2 and just got a decent-ish graduate role for a CLS franchise; GWST doesn't have a degree at all and has a better job than me.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    _79- I'm getting mostly 2:1s this year but got very poor grades last year. I want to put this year's grades on my CV really but don't know if that is allowed? Also, that would mean putting my second year grades up and I really don't want them on there! They are embarassing and make me look thick!

    Kermit- I don't think I wanna work in Law but I'm really interested in my Social Security Law module at the moment but I don't know if that would get me a job any further than the job centre? :|

    I'm not going to study a LPC for the same reasons that I'm not doing a masters although saying that, tbh, I no longer want to be a solicitor. I haven't exactly enjoyed this course, I've found it very boring actually. Also, I can't see myself getting a contract as the competition is so high. I also can't see myself enjoying it as a career as I get easily stressed, I can imagine myself really not coping, haha.

    I'd love to put my degree to use though.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    _79- I'm getting mostly 2:1s this year but got very poor grades last year. I want to put this year's grades on my CV really but don't know if that is allowed? Also, that would mean putting my second year grades up and I really don't want them on there! They are embarassing and make me look thick!

    You can put whatever modules you want on your CV, your CV is simply an advertising tool to advertise you to the best of your ability, nothing should be negative on your CV - so I would personally go for the ones that would make me stand out the best - which in your case would be your 2:1s and yes, of course this is allowed. (For my CV I don't advertise all of my GCSE grades as some were pathetic - I just put I hold 9 GCSES, including English (A), Maths (B) and Science (B)).

    So for example, you could do the following (I've used IT as I have a degree in IT)

    BSc (Hons) Information Technology (2:2)

    During my final year I completed the following modules, Communication Studies (2:1), Multimedia (2:1) and Project Management (2:1), Information law (2:2) and my dissertation was on blah blah (2:1)

    or

    Degree had a specific focus on the following modules Communication Studies (2:1), Multimedia (2:1) and Project Management (2:1)

    If an employer wants to know more about you then you'll get an interview - don't worry too much about what you omit from a CV but make sure what you include makes them want you to invite you for interview.

    79
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You don't ever put your individual module grades up on a CV, that's a huge no-no. If they really want to know they will ask. You simply state that you specialised in whichever modules you enjoyed and are relevant for the work you're applying for.

    Highlighting a good individual mark doesn't do you any favours- if its the same mark you got overall then its stating the obvious, and if its above the overall mark then it shows that you failed over modules badly.

    If you want I could email you my CV, just to show what I've done with mine. It seems to work quite well.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ah, I never thought of it like that.

    Kermit, that would be great if you could do that though. I'm in the middle of trying to do my CV! I'll PM you my email address :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote: »
    You don't ever put your individual module grades up on a CV, that's a huge no-no. If they really want to know they will ask. You simply state that you specialised in whichever modules you enjoyed and are relevant for the work you're applying for.

    Highlighting a good individual mark doesn't do you any favours- if its the same mark you got overall then its stating the obvious, and if its above the overall mark then it shows that you failed over modules badly.

    If you want I could email you my CV, just to show what I've done with mine. It seems to work quite well.

    Fair enough, but I disagree that it would show that you failed other modules badly though - especially if you chose a certain number that you did well on - I got a 2:1 overall for my degree but I got thirds in some of my units cos I hated them - I would only ever show the firsts and 2:1s though on an application form - employers know you're not a perfect academic if you have a 2:2/2:1 so know you've not done so well in certain areas of the degree - why not highlight where you did well?

    This was recommended to me by number of HR people when I was trying to make my CV more marketable - and it worked.

    Theres really no harm in showing where your strengths are - espcially as a way to make a CV more impressive.

    BUT I've not needed to use a CV in a while so the things may well have changed and for the future my CV will change dramatically - so I won't give any more bad advice with regards to graduate CVs

    Good luck with your CV :)

    79
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