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Never had a job before

Hi, 

I’m 19 and I’ve just left college. I was planning on going to uni (did the application, got into different unis and accepted a place) but I decided it would be best to defer until next year due to mental health and physical health problems. I’ve never had a proper job before as I’ve had issues with my health throughout most of my teen years, making it harder to me to work and do schooling at the same time. I want to use this year to gain a bit of experience in the working world before university, but I am absolutely terrified. I suffer from pretty bad anxiety, and I was wondering if anyone has any advice on coping with work and illness, as well as applying for the right jobs (I’m only interested in part time work at the moment), and gaining the confidence to make the plunge into working.

((Also sorry if I post anything in the wrong category and stuff because i’ve never posted here before))

Thankyou for reading :) 

Comments

  • EyepatchEyepatch Posts: 378 Rampant Poster
    To start with, Congratulations getting into University! 

    Getting your first job can be stressful, but remember that everyone had a first job at some point. Try small shops, you have to talk to customers but you can also spend time stacking shelves and if its a small shop you may not have many visitors. Cafes can be good, but they do involve chatting with customers. I'd stay away from restaurants if crowds make you nervous. Many charity shops are always looking for volunteers, but of corse you don't get payed for this.

    Maybe make a list of things that help when you are feeling nervous, if animals calm you down see if there are any pet shops you can apply to. Maybe pick something relating to your university corse, if you are enjoying yourself you will be more relaxed. Dog walking is very relaxing, cleaning too involves very little talking. Supermarkets are usually looking to hire but they can get busy sometimes. You could also try call centres, as you can practice talking to people but don't need to be face to face. 

    There are plenty of tips to creating a great CV online and lots of jobs take online applications. Book shops are quite calming. There are even some jobs that are entirely online, if you draw or write code you could find places online that need those skills. How about asking around your area if anyone needs a tutor? You could teach someone younger and help them pass collage or high school classes. 

    Good luck and feel free to ask any questions or tell us how your job hunting is going :) 
    "Sometimes we find ourselves stuck between choosing what is right, and what is easy." 
    TheAprilFool
  • AzzimanAzziman Posts: 340 Rampant Poster
    riribaker said:
    Hi, 

    I’m 19 and I’ve just left college. I was planning on going to uni (did the application, got into different unis and accepted a place) but I decided it would be best to defer until next year due to mental health and physical health problems. I’ve never had a proper job before as I’ve had issues with my health throughout most of my teen years, making it harder to me to work and do schooling at the same time. I want to use this year to gain a bit of experience in the working world before university, but I am absolutely terrified. I suffer from pretty bad anxiety, and I was wondering if anyone has any advice on coping with work and illness, as well as applying for the right jobs (I’m only interested in part time work at the moment), and gaining the confidence to make the plunge into working.

    ((Also sorry if I post anything in the wrong category and stuff because i’ve never posted here before))

    Thankyou for reading :) 
    Hi riribaker,

    Welcome to the forum!x

    In regard to working with mental health conditions, firms are legally required to provide reasonable adjustments to people with disabilities under the Equality Act 2010, so it's worth having that discussion with a job you're interested in.

    Another thing I'd say about working in your gap year is that try to aim for a job in your preferred field, but if you can't, get another job anyways, if nothing more than for money and to build your CV. There are plenty of internship and summer placement programmes out there, as well as part time or full time jobs in lots of retail shops, and volunteering places are also valuable as well if you can't get a full time job. You have plenty of opportunities waiting for you out there - all you have to do is make the jump and grab them!x

    Much love <3
  • riribakerriribaker Posts: 2 Noob
    Thankyou both for replying :) 
    Ive found a few jobs I’m going to apply for. I’m not sure whether I should be saying I have anxiety on the disability part of the applicantions, as I’ve been told I could be prejudged because of this. What do you think?
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 Noob
    I've just found that The Mix has a very useful tutorial called How to write a CV.


    Also there is an informative You Tube video called Tips on writing your CV.
    I'm driven by self doubt.
  • EyepatchEyepatch Posts: 378 Rampant Poster
    I feel like its up to you if you want to write it down on your CV or not, perhaps think of the job you are applying too. If you don't think there will be any situations that could cause a jump in your anxiety levels, then you don't have to write it down.

    If you applied to a supermarket they could ask you to work on the shop floor where you will only talk to customers occasionally, or they might ask you to work on the till where there will be people coming and going during the day. You could specify in a cover letter that because of your anxiety you feel you would be able to work better on the shop floor than the tills. Think about the job and if any part of it would be better for you, then add that into your cover letter if you feel its necessary.  

    If it helps, I work giving tours sometimes and being surrounded by people asking questions does make me nervous, but I tried really hard to research all the answers so that I could be prepared for each question I get. I really love the city I am working in and this helps a lot, although it is tiring and usually I go home and hide in my room after Ive still got though the day and done the work. 

    Whichever job you apply for, do lots of research so that you know what to expect and can prepare for anything that might come up. :) 

    Good luck and don't give up! 
    "Sometimes we find ourselves stuck between choosing what is right, and what is easy." 
  • Invisible_meInvisible_me Posts: 130 The Mix convert

    Hi there,

    Similar situation to you I was in, and did feel preety rubbish but just felt like I couldn't do anything. But you know what sometimes Anxiety will surprise you. I have preety bad anxiety. I recently uplied for voluntary work in a school I never thought I would be able to do it with the crowds and everything, noise etc unpredictability. (which would all cause high anxiety). But actually, it has rather surprised me-Anxiety has remained rather calm during volunteering- really enjoying it and actually given me something positive.

    I was worried when I declared it on my application form. I wasn't going to declare it but I was worried it would cause difficulties. Once I wrote it I just submitted it. But then a lot of worry came in especially as I had to wait a while for a response. I was like "right, that's me gone, Anxiety never letse do anything, nor will I be accepted anywhere. School definitely won't which then flodded everything else"... But actually it made no difference, and she was very nice.

    Ideally and legally palces can't discriminate under  equality act etc.. but sometimes, I imagine they may be a bit like "Ok, how will you manage?"... I know this seems daunting at first, but you never know, you may be surprised.

    I think part time is very good and @Eyepatch has some very good tips.

    Well done by the way!

    In_me

    Eyepatch
  • SevenSeven Posts: 58 Moderator
    Hey everyone, 

    That's some very nice advice from Invisible_Me and Eyepatch, you might be positively surprised, because people can use that info to help you out! Of course, it's understandable if anxiety is making something feel worrying, so taking small steps can sometimes be really useful. As Invisible_Me pointed out, sometimes you expect it to overtake you, but when you're enjoying something, or you're passionate about something, it can really take over and there's a good chance you can really enjoy what you're doing. 

    How is all this shaping up now after a little time?
    EyepatchInvisible_me
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