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Homeopathic Therapy v ADs?

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
I'll probably post another thread going more in depth about the events of last night and what happened after school today, but long story short - got myself in such a state last night and then after school I just broke down and was talking to my mentor and then we went to talk to the head of child protection or whatever she is..

Anyway, she was saying if I had ever thought about homeopathic therapy? She breifly explained it to me but I'm a bit confused about what it actually is?
Well she said I should try that because if I went to the doctors they would just give me anti-depressants...

So has anyone had any experience with Homeopathic Therapy? When she was explaining it to me it sounded like placebo... but it's not? Completely threw me - but if anyone has any experience or extra info on homeopathic therapy or ADs could you help me out?

Thank you :)
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Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I don't know much about homeopathy to be honest but I you should talk to your GP whatever you decide, because they're the professional.

    They can't force you take anything or stop you taking homeopathic remedies but they do have the information you're after. They are also well-placed to refer you to therapy which is really important because medication isn't a cure it just acts as a stabiliser.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Not all GPs just chuck ADs at you.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Homepathy is complete bunk and woo-woo. If a GP suggests it to you, go find yourself another GP.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0Z7KeNCi7g
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Homepathy is complete bunk and woo-woo. If a GP suggests it to you, go find yourself another GP.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0Z7KeNCi7g

    This.

    Not a single double-blind study about the effectiveness of homeopathic medication has passed EVER. The evidence that it's completely garbage is overwhelming and there is no sign that it does actually work. The only thing this is still alive is because people apparently still believe in it.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    StrubbleS wrote: »
    Not a single double-blind study about the effectiveness of homeopathic medication has passed EVER. The evidence that it's completely garbage is overwhelming and there is no sign that it does actually work. The only thing this is still alive is because people apparently still believe in it.

    :yes:

    Man, it isn't really that great that she said all of this to you.... Especially the bit about if you went to the doctors they would just give you ADs. You're under 18 right? So if you did see a doctor about depression they *should* provide you with some sort of therapy.

    The NICE guidelines (which are some guidelines that doctors and healthcare professionals are meant to follow) for depression in young people say these three things (well a lot more but yeah...):
    Antidepressant medication should not be used for the initial treatment of children and young people with mild depression.
    Children and young people with moderate to severe depression should be offered, as a first-line treatment, a specific psychological therapy
    Antidepressant medication should not be offered to a child or young person with moderate to severe depression except in combination with a concurrent psychological therapy.

    I really think that visiting your GP would be a good step :) They may have quite a few helpful suggestions....
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Homeopathy is complete bull. It's just water, ultimately.

    Your GP will offer more than just ADs so it's worth talking to them.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ah thank you :)
    When she was explaining it to me I was like... right?
    But she said research into it further so I have, and I can use all these to back up why I'm not going. I looked at prices and it's £75 for consultation.. Which isn't happening if they're going to give me basicly water...

    Thank you for the information guys :)
    Will try and see my gp... Just see how things go
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    bleepy wrote: »
    Thank you for the information guys :)
    Will try and see my gp... Just see how things go

    Great :)

    When you go, it can help to have things written down so that you don't forget anything you really wanted to mention.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    StrubbleS wrote: »
    The only thing this is still alive is because people apparently still believe in it.

    Don't underestimate the placebo effect. Other than that, homeopathy is a load of rubbish.

    But then a lot of people think ADs are too.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ive had good results with homeopathy for some stuff, but i wouldnt necessarily rely on it for depression, although there would be no harm to give it a try, but id suggest going to a proper homeopath rather than checking out possible remedies on the net if you want to go down that route, as different rememdies work better for different people. It doesnt work the same way as conventional medicine and that is why a lot of the sort of tests they do for conventional medicine dont show great results for it, yet soooo many people worldwide have great results. Its worth not dismissing out of hand if youre actually interested.
    My view isnt popular on this forum, so am expecting a backlash of course ;)

    there are also other natural remedies for depression that you may find interesting if you would rather go down that route than conventional antidepressants. Namely 5HTP (I and many others have had amazing results with this supplement), St Johns wort, Omega 3 supplements, regular exercise, sunlight and sometimes something as simple as a multivitamin and mineral supplement with iron. All these CAN have great effects without some of the less desirable side effects of conventional Anti-Ds, especially if combined with talking therapy/counselling so i think its good to explore them first if you can, but also, there are a lot of people who respond best of all to conventional antidepressants, and these are of course available on the NHS, so cheaper for you
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I was sent this the other day. made me LOL.
    The world has been placed on a heightened security alert following reports that New Age terrorists have harnessed the power of homeopathy for evil. ?Homeopathic weapons represent a major threat to world peace,? said President Barack Obama, ?they might not cause any actual damage but the placebo effect could be quite devastating.?

    The H2O-bomb has been developed by the radical New Age group, The Axis of Aquarius. In a taped message to the world, their leader, Professor Hubert Pennington, said: ?For too long the New Age movement has been dismissed as a bunch of beardy weirdy cranks and charlatans. But now we have weapons-grade homeopathy and we demand to be taken seriously.?

    Homeopathic bombs are comprised of 99.9% water but contain the merest trace element of explosive. The solution is then repeatedly diluted so as to leave only the memory of the explosive in the water molecules. According to the laws of homeopathy, the more that the water is diluted, the more powerful the bomb becomes.

    ?It was only a matter of time before these people got hold of the material that they needed to make these bombs,? said former UN weapons inspector, Hans Blix, ?The world is a much more dangerous place with the advent of these Weapons of Mass Dilution.?

    ?A homeopathic attack could bring entire cities to a standstill,? said BBC Security Correspondent, Frank Gardner, ?Large numbers of people could easily become convinced that they have been killed and hospitals would be unable to cope with the massive influx of the ?walking suggestible?.?

    The severity of the situation has already resulted in the New Age terror threat level being raised from ?lilac? to the more worrisome ?purple? aura. Meanwhile, new security measures at airports require that all water bottles be scanned to ensure that they are not being used to smuggle the memory of an explosion on board a plane.

    ?Homeopathic weapons are the ultimate Smart Bombs,? warned President Obama, ?They are so smart that they only affect the gullible. The only defence is for everyone to remain calm, vigilant and to always wear a magic vibrating crystal.?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think it's crazy that professionals can recommend water as a treatment for any condition. You might see a benefit from the placebo effect, but that's all it is.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think it's crazy that professionals can recommend water as a treatment for any condition. You might see a benefit from the placebo effect, but that's all it is.

    What's worse is that it's publicly funded via the NHS.

    It's dangerous shit. I saw a travel program where parents were giving their kids homeopathic malaria tablets.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    What's worse is that it's publicly funded via the NHS.

    It's dangerous shit. I saw a travel program where parents were giving their kids homeopathic malaria tablets.
    ... but apparently recommendations by pharmacists of homeopathic remedies for malaria and other diseases doesn't constitute "being reckless with the safety and wellbeing of others".
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ... but apparently recommendations by pharmacists of homeopathic remedies for malaria and other diseases doesn't constitute "being reckless with the safety and wellbeing of others".

    It's really worrying shit. This kind of stuff makes me seriously worry about going to see a GP about health issues that I have. I've got a fucked shoulder that needs sorting, but I've put off going to the GP until I've done my own research into which treatments are likely bunk and which are proven to work.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ive never been recommended homeopathic anything by any doctor in my life, but you can ask for it IF youre interested. No need to start freaking out that youre going to be forced into accepting homeopathy when you need chemo or Aids meds. Dont worry.

    Also noones forcing you to take homeopathic malaria medicine, or any medicine, and its generally a parents right what they do and dont medicate their child with. No need to start saying its the fault of homepathy because some people who use it take risks. The vast vast majority of people who use the odd homeopathic remedy are just normal people who want to try something more natural, and often have good results, whether or not you want to believe it, but of course would turn to conventional medicine if they needed to
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    and its generally a parents right what they do and dont medicate their child with.

    Not to be a wet blanket, but parents have been rightfully sentenced to negligient manslaughter giving their child homeopathic medicine for serious sicknesses like pneumonia, who then surprisingly died.

    And since it IS only water or milk sugar globuli (some of the dilution factors equal a liter of medicine diluted to a volume as big as the entire universe, and no, I am neither exaggerating nor making this up), with no trace amount of the medicine, it is impossible that it works. The "good results" are either placebo or the immune system just fighting off the disease by itself, and it has been proven over and over again.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Not to be a wet blanket, but parents have been rightfully sentenced to negligient manslaughter giving their child homeopathic medicine for serious sicknesses like pulmonia, who then surprisingly died.

    I would hardly call giving a child homoeopathic medicine "neglect". It would also have to be proved beyond reasonable doubt that the child would've survived if they were given other medicine.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    children have died because their parents gave them a vegan diet too. Doesnt mean theres something awful about veganism. Just means sometimes its not appropriate and sometimes its fine. The neglect part has nothing to do with the homeopathy and everything to do with not trying to find another treatment when the first one didnt work. When a seriously depressed person commits suicide when on antidepressants, noone cries neglect because the antidepressants didnt work.

    I HAVE had good effects from homeopathy on myself and on my children and am convinced it wasnt placebo, and know a lot of other people who have had good effects from it too. I understand that scientifically it shouldnt work, but there are a lot of things that dont make sense in the world yet. That doesnt make it rubbish, and its arrogant to assume so.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Melian wrote: »
    I would hardly call giving a child homoeopathic medicine "neglect". It would also have to be proved beyond reasonable doubt that the child would've survived if they were given other medicine.

    Found a typo in my post. I meant "pneumonia". and yes, Pneumonia is very easily cured with anti-biotics, but is life threatening when not treated.
    children have died because their parents gave them a vegan diet too. Doesnt mean theres something awful about veganism. Just means sometimes its not appropriate and sometimes its fine. The neglect part has nothing to do with the homeopathy and everything to do with not trying to find another treatment when the first one didnt work. When a seriously depressed person commits suicide when on antidepressants, noone cries neglect because the antidepressants didnt work.

    I HAVE had good effects from homeopathy on myself and on my children and am convinced it wasnt placebo, and know a lot of other people who have had good effects from it too. I understand that scientifically it shouldnt work, but there are a lot of things that dont make sense in the world yet. That doesnt make it rubbish, and its arrogant to assume so.

    It is possible to have a vegan lifestyle, but it is neglect when the parents give a child in development only nuts and seeds and stuff like that to eat, and having their own child die of malnutrition, because they "believe" in it. But any kind of approach to cure a serious disease with homeopathy, and therefore wasting valueable time, where the patient could receive actual working medicine is careless and negligent to me. The difference with antidepressants is, they are clinically tried and have shown effect, something homeopathy has absolutely never ever in any of dozen independently studies. Actually I remember reading that not even studies conducted by homeopathists gave conclusive results.

    Tell you what, since the ocean has probably dissolved probably every kind of medicine or just about everything in a teeny weeny bit, I suggest next time you just take a sip of sea water, because you can save some money there.

    What kind of good results are you talking anyway? Did a caugh or a stuffy nose go away after a week or so, after taking homeopathic medication? I just boggles my mind how any literate person who can tie one's own shoelaces can believe in homeopathy.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    # the remedy Nux Vomica took away my pregnancy sickness where nothing else seemed to work.
    Im assuming if it was the placebo effect, then the first thing i tried would have worked.

    # had a severe allergic reaction on my face where it all swelled up and went crusty, went to the doctors, got steroid cream, antihistamines etc, nothing worked and it was horrendous. My boyfriends nana suggested the remedy Apis Mel, and within 12 hours the swelling went down.

    # my son had the skin condition Molloscum. Horrible warty things on his torso. The doctors said there is nothing they can do, and it will go away in about 18 months. I saw a friend who said she had seen a homeopath when her daughter got it, and it cleared up really quickly. So i googled remedies, tried one, didnt work, tried another, didnt work. Went to see a proper homeopath, who asked him lots of questions about his temperament, likes dislikes to determine what sort of remedy would suit him best. She settled on the remedy nat Mur. by the next day, most of the warts had gone, and within 3 days they had all disappeared.
    I told my friend whos child had the condition too, and she went to the same homeopath and her daughters cleared up in a day.

    So there. I agree, its weird and shouldnt work, but for some reason, it often does, but it doesnt do well in scientific tests, and i understand that, because unlike conventional medicine, its not one cure that works for everyone, its more of a holistic treatment. I fail to see how i and two friends can cure our young childrens skin conditions as some sort of placebo by proxy, so quickly and effectively.

    Oh and the remedy chamomilla is great for soothing upset babies. Thats another one ive used a lot
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    So there. I agree, its weird and shouldnt work, but for some reason, it often does, but it doesnt do well in scientific tests, and i understand that, because unlike conventional medicine, its not one cure that works for everyone, its more of a holistic treatment.

    There's no reason that can't be tested scientifically. Unfortunately, the evidence doesn't back up your experiences on a wider scale.

    When my grandmother had was alive, the doctors gave her less than 6 months to live. She lived for a further two years. No alternative medicine, yet if she had taken some, no doubt some would have attributed that to the medicine. Which isn't to say there aren't plenty of natural remedies out there, just that in most cases, the active ingredients have already been turned into proper drugs. The only thing that these anecdotes prove is that doctors aren't psychic. They don't really know how long something will take to clear up, they can only have an educated guess based on prior experience.

    If you feel it works for you, and you're willing to spend the money, then fine. But there's a difference between that and recommending it for someone else when they're asking for advice about a medical problem for which there are plenty of medically proven treatments.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Oh and the remedy chamomilla is great for soothing upset babies. Thats another one ive used a lot

    The homeopathic "remedy" or the actual plant product? Because no-one is doubting the existence of naturally occurring remedies.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    the homeopathic remedy.

    hey im not trying to say anyone else should use it if theyre not interested. Totally up to you, but being closed minded is noone elses loss but your own. Im just telling you my experience
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ah yes, "close minded." The standard insult delivered to anyone who insists on actual evidence before believing wild claims about the world. Homeopathy isn't some experimental new procedure that may or may not work, but needs to be tested. It has been around for ages, has been thoroughly tested, and has failed at every opportunity to demonstrate its efficacy. So at what point does being "closed-minded" become simply accepting the overwhelming evidence of scientific trials?

    Of course, if you feel it works for you, keep spending your money. But I would say exactly the same thing about psychics and faith healers too, and would still oppose anyone making false claims about their effectiveness to others.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ah yes, "close minded." The standard insult delivered to anyone who insists on actual evidence before believing wild claims about the world. Homeopathy isn't some experimental new procedure that may or may not work, but needs to be tested. It has been around for ages, has been thoroughly tested, and has failed at every opportunity to demonstrate its efficacy. So at what point does being "closed-minded" become simply accepting the overwhelming evidence of scientific trials?

    This.

    "I'd need proper evidence before accepting that proposition as likely true".

    "Stop being so closed-minded".
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The child died in France because the parents relied on vegan and homeopathic medicine for an illness that needed to be treated by proper medics. Quite rightly, the parents were prosecuted for child neglect. There's faith in homeopathy and veganism and there's being deluded, it's about finding the right balance.

    Generally I take the view that "alternative medicine" that works is simply called "medicine". Data is not the plural of anecdote, but I do also retain a healthy skepticism for a lot of "clinical trials", given how many research units are funded by the big PharmaCos (the independence of studies out of Durham University, as an example, is diluted by the amount of funding the University receives from such notable organisations as GlaxoSmithKline and British American Tobacco). I think homeopathy can work, and that's there's a commercial interest in finding that it doesn't, but it certainly doesn't work as well as homeopaths would like to claim. There's a lot of bull and double-bull when it comes to medicine.

    At least we can agree that chiropractic is a load of bunkum (unless you actually DO have back pain).
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Should we move this discussion to P&D?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think homeopathy can work, and that's there's a commercial interest in finding that it doesn't, but it certainly doesn't work as well as homeopaths would like to claim. There's a lot of bull and double-bull when it comes to medicine.
    .
    quite possibly this.

    I have much less interest in converting people to the wonders of homeopathy, than people seem to have for telling me what ive experienced didnt really happen because it doesnt match up with some commercial research that theyve seen that they probably didnt even understand either
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