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Wilderness camps: a solution to teens addicted to WoW?

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Hello all. Just a short introduction, I'm a 34-year old single father of a 13-year old son who does nothing but play World of Warcraft all day, all long. He never leaves his room, fails all his classes, has no friends, and simply sits in front of the computer 8-12 hours a day. He only stops playing when he has to do numbers 1 and 2, and eat of course. Other than that, zilcho. He doesn't even talk to me sometimes.

I tried talking to him about his seeming "addiction," but he clamps up and goes straight to his room. I don't understand whether he's angry or touchy or whatever, but it's obvious that he's way over his head with this Warcraft game.

Out of concern, I just research ways on how teenagers can overcome their addictions by research on the 'Net for some advice. I stumbled upon a couple of boot camps and boarding schools but I was intrigued after I read an information about wilderness camps because the teens stay outdoors for a couple of weeks, which will prevent my son from playing any games on the PC. Has anybody tried taking their sons or daughters to wilderness camps? Any thoughts, comments, and experiences are highly appreciated. Thanks!

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Your son's 13, obviously he can't control his own computer use, but you are his father and can.

    Give him an ultimatum that unless he stops playing excessively (let him have something reasonable, like 4 hours a week or something), you will shut off his account or his computer. You're perfectly within your rights as a father to do that, even if your son will be upset by that.

    Speaking as someone who knows a lot of WoW addicts and just how many years it can put someone behind. It's like they give up their life.

    I think the wilderness camp sounds interesting, and if it works that's great. Whether they will work long term though I'm not sure.

    I think it's certainly something to look into, it's certainly in my experience an area where the government and welfare professionals haven't really noticed it because it's behind closed doors where the parents should be intervening - but many don't know how or aren't able to effectively.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Any thoughts, comments, and experiences are highly appreciated. Thanks!

    My thoughts are I wonder what YOU are firstly doing as a father to get him out of the house on weekend day trips, fishing etc which would probably do wonders for your father/son bonding - and be fun for both of you?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Teagan wrote: »
    My thoughts are I wonder what YOU are firstly doing as a father to get him out of the house on weekend day trips, fishing etc which would probably do wonders for your father/son bonding - and be fun for both of you?

    This. :yes:

    The 'wilderness camps' may work for a couple of weeks, but what's going to happen when he gets back? Things like this don't have an on/off switch. If my parents had sent me away for two weeks because they didn't like something I was doing aged 13, I'd be pretty pissed off.

    Give him a maximum WoW time limit and find things to do with him (things linked to stuff HE'S into, but that you can do together). He'll kick back at first but as long as you're totally consistent, he'll find new things to do with his time.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Teagan wrote: »
    My thoughts are I wonder what YOU are firstly doing as a father to get him out of the house on weekend day trips, fishing etc which would probably do wonders for your father/son bonding - and be fun for both of you?
    This.

    If you're that bothered by it, limit his internet access.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    As far as WoW goes.

    1. There are parental controls where u can limit his gameplay.

    2. It has to be paid for. How is it being paid for ? If it's you then stop.

    3. Pull the plug out the wall.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    RubberSkin wrote: »
    As far as WoW goes.

    1. There are parental controls where u can limit his gameplay.

    2. It has to be paid for. How is it being paid for ? If it's you then stop.

    3. Pull the plug out the wall.
    :yes:.

    I always wonder how parents can say 'omg s/he plays too much wow!' when the kid isn't old enough to pay for his own subscription.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i'm pretty sure everythings been said that i can think of but i'll reneforce the fact that YOUR his father, he's 13, you should have some amount of control over how much he plays, ie parental control and if he still refuses take away his PC for a certain amount of time or take it out of his room and set it up where you can keep an eye on his useage
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
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  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Surely its a spam post advertising wilderness camps.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Wyetry wrote: »
    Surely its a spam post advertising wilderness camps.

    I thought that too.
  • Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Warming up? Posts: 16,688
    Teagan wrote: »
    I thought that too.
    Same, but let's give the doubt of benefit... or the other way around.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Firstly, what RS said - parental controls on the battle.net account.

    Secondly, you can set an internet 'curfew' on the router. Go into your router settings and set the time when the internet cuts off. You can specifiy it by IP, so that it cuts your son off but the rest of the family can stay on.

    When I was a kid, I was limited to 1 hour of gaming every day. It's time to pass that onto your son :-)

    As for WoW addiction, I was addicted for 1 year which was 2006. These was the good old days of having MC, BWL and AQ on farm. WoW started going to pot from TBC onwards. I fail to understand how someone can be as addicted in the current WoW.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Because not everybody likes the same things? I've been in AQ and I can't imagine doing it however many times a week, it would be hellish, even at 80 (we couldn't get the twins down, for example). Ulduar, though, is lovely, and while ToC is the laziest excuse for a raid instance ever, I also really like what I've seen of Icecrown.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Same, but let's give the doubt of benefit... or the other way around.

    OK well to the op -don't try and get out of being a crap parent by paying someone else to get rid of your problem for you - you need to take the computer out of your sons room (IMHO children (i.e those under the age of 18 should not be allowed a television or computer in their room - but then i'm a bit weird as i even thought this as a child) and actually try and communicate with him and take him out to do something together as a family - something outdoorsey which requires both of your full attention is good - preferably with an element of danger - like maybe sailing - you both might die if you don't communicate properly.

    Good luck
  • littlemissylittlemissy knit chick Posts: 9,972
    Wyetry wrote: »
    Surely its a spam post advertising wilderness camps.

    Definitely.

    This guy is 34 with a 13y/o son. So he was 11 when he had him? Not impossible, I know, but rather improbably ...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Definitely.

    This guy is 34 with a 13y/o son. So he was 11 when he had him? Not impossible, I know, but rather improbably ...

    21 - so a bit more likely.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    If the kid is using WoW so often it could be an escape from reality...
    • Does the boy have a good social life?
    • Is he being bullied?
    • Who is he talking to on WoW?
    • Is his home life happy?
    • How is school?

    Or maybe he's just a stroppy teen who wants his own way and needs a bit of discipline.

    I don't know how effective wilderness camps would be, especially if the problem is something at home. He'll just come back and fall in to the same cycles imo...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    This guy is 34 with a 13y/o son. So he was 11 when he had him?

    Wow. :no:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Definitely.

    This guy is 34 with a 13y/o son. So he was 11 when he had him? Not impossible, I know, but rather improbably ...

    I blame Ed Balls! :p
  • littlemissylittlemissy knit chick Posts: 9,972
    Oh my god. You could tell I was half asleep when I read this thread this morning! :lol:

    Ooops :blush:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Oh my god. You could tell I was half asleep when I read this thread this morning! :lol:

    Ooops :blush:

    Late nights and early mornings...
  • littlemissylittlemissy knit chick Posts: 9,972
    MoK wrote: »
    Late nights and early mornings...

    An 11 month old, nasty hayfever and a million things swirling round my head trying to get organised for taking us all on holiday tonight!

    That's my excuse, anyway.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    If it's not spam then as people have said you are his dad, you have every right to limit his playing time.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Namaste wrote: »
    If the kid is using WoW so often it could be an escape from reality...
    • Does the boy have a good social life?
    • Is he being bullied?
    • Who is he talking to on WoW?
    • Is his home life happy?
    • How is school?

    Or maybe he's just a stroppy teen who wants his own way and needs a bit of discipline.

    I don't know how effective wilderness camps would be, especially if the problem is something at home. He'll just come back and fall in to the same cycles imo...

    In an environment inside the wilderness camps people seems to see are physical training but it is not only through physical training. wilderness schools teaches them how to deal with their emotional, mental and psychological phase. Dealing with their past experiences and eliminating them to become a better person is one thing they do, giving them enough care and respect is what they needed most. That is how wilderness camps become effective to people.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Well considering that the posted link is also in the users profile, I would say this is spam.
  • **helen****helen** Mod malarkist Posts: 9,235 Listening Ear
    G-Raffe wrote: »
    Well considering that the posted link is also in the users profile, I would say this is spam.

    Quite likely - I'm going to remove the link from profile and if the link appears in any more posts or threads then all will disappear...
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