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Can't they just keep old deposit?

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Hello all, I'm awake at this time stone sober on a saturday night because I'm a bit worried about something that's come up with our landlord.

Basically, they've asked us to give them a new deposit before Easter. We signed our 12 month lease back in August 08. I don't know why they're so keen for money when our lease isn't even up..

So that's £200 with a week's notice. I don't have that kind of money, I barely make rent. I told them our loans don't come in until the end of April and they said, "ok, how about £50?". Grr.

They said our old deposits will be put back into our accounts at the end of the month so this all seems a bit pointless and ridiculous. Wtf is the point exactly and more importantly, do I *HAVE* to hand over money for their reassurance that we are renewing our lease?

I don't have the cash, I have uni paperwork I've just found out needs paid off so that's priority.

Help please :banghead:

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    What do they need a new deposit for? Just outright tell them to keep the one they already have over for next year.
    If they badger you that much just say you dont want the place again..chances are they wont find anyone else to fill it in such a short space of time anyway. Letting agents always seem to try and use scare tactics but theyre all full of shit to be honest so i wouldnt listen to a word they say.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    No idea what they want the deposit for - they kept repeating the term, "for reassurance that you're all going to keep the house for another year" which I can understand but if I'm signing another contract then that's reassurance in itself is it not?!

    Maybe they just need some cash.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The words "I haven't got £200 because you still have it" may be useful.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Whowhere wrote: »
    The words "I haven't got £200 because you still have it" may be useful.

    Yes I think this is the key here. You can pay his new deposit when he returns your old one, and not before.

    I can understand if there is some requirement that the new deposit has to go directly from you into a scheme, but even so you shouldn't be paying that out until you have the "old" money back.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Thanks all. I'm waiting to hear back from my vp of welfare at uni to see where we stand legally should he get difficult..
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    When I rented a room for 3½ years, the landlord simply kept the deposit that I gave at the start. I don't see the point in recycling £200.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ^^^ Exactly. This seems rather unusual...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    According to my mother and housemate I should just keep quiet and pay. For fucks sake everyone is fine about this apart from me apparently!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Halloween wrote: »
    According to my mother and housemate I should just keep quiet and pay. For fucks sake everyone is fine about this apart from me apparently!

    On what basis would you want to pay ? I can't see any reason behind this.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You've not been clear enough about what the agent is asking here.

    If they are asking for a holding deposit for the new tenancy then they are entitled to do this. If the holding deposit then goes to be the landlord as the breakages deposit then it needs to be protected. If you tell them to swivel they might let the property to somebody else from August, so it's up to you whether you want to pay or not. In the current climate they're less likely to get it let out to someone else, so they'll try and put pressure on you to take the house again by making you pay a holding deposit. It's up to you whether you pay or not, but there are plenty of houses available if this one is let to someone else. In my university town we have about 500 bed spaces unlet, which is causing the agents to poo themselves with fear.

    If they are asking for you to replace the deposit you've already paid, then they can't do this, it's a breach of the tenancy agreement. This would be rather dodgy, and would make me think your landlord's got rid of the house and that there's a new landlord. I'd be amazed if you'd get the old deposit back before the end of the tenancy.

    Either way, I'd be very tempted to not pay.
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