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My Job Is Probably Killing Me...

SystemSystem Posts: 8,622 Staff Team
Ok guys heres my situation. I work night shifts which is apparently very bad for your health? My job involves of me and another person lifting and putting 16stone weight steel sheets into a machine nearly all night long... I am a 19year old man with a very sore back and a very sore right arm because of this job. My problem is I have been there for 2 years now and I can't afford to leave this job and start somewhere new. Any suggestions? Theres abound to be a health and safety law against this...? :confused:

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Health and safety against night shifts, certainly not.

    Lifting however there is a limit, although i'm not sure what it is. At the workplace there should be information about this.

    Maybe look for another job now, whilst your still working currently... You say it's killing you, so either move on, or grin and bare it.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I say go to the Doctors and get checked out, just incase you've hurt yourself permenently.

    There is no harm in job-hunting whilst still working at the current place. If your job is physically demanding and uncomfortable then you shouldn't be doing it, regardless of pay. Your health is important.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ok guys heres my situation. I work night shifts which is apparently very bad for your health? My job involves of me and another person lifting and putting 16stone weight steel sheets into a machine nearly all night long... I am a 19year old man with a very sore back and a very sore right arm because of this job. My problem is I have been there for 2 years now and I can't afford to leave this job and start somewhere new. Any suggestions? Theres abound to be a health and safety law against this...? :confused:
    16 stone is way over legal limits mate ...your boss not heard they invented fork lift trucks?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    16 stone is way over legal limits mate ...your boss not heard they invented fork lift trucks?
    That's 100 kilos!

    Some people cope well with night shifts, others don't. If you don't like nights and you're knackering your back with the heavy lifting, it's time to look for another job.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    16stone weight

    i think the legal is about the 22 kilo mark thats what it was when i worked at a fishfarm a few years back even though they never took any heed of this either but wht your lifting i'd imagine is well over the legal amount
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    This from the Health and Safety Executive website;

    "Are there any recommended weight limits for manual lifting?

    The law does not include maximum weight limits.The main legal requirements require avoidance or control of risk. HSE does not recommend weight limits. The Manual Handling Operations Regulations (MHOR) guidance gives basic guideline figures for lifting and lowering which indicate when a more detailed risk assessment should be carried out."


    More information on risk assessment

    HTH
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You should ask to see the manual handling risk assessment carried out on your task. You have a right to see these.

    If one has not been carried out and you injure yourself they are screwed and you could sue them for a nice leaving pay packet.

    The law states that where ever possible you should always mechanise a task rather than have a person do it, there should be trolleys, lifting devices etc.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    My friend's boyfriend used to work lifting heavy things while still growing. He's a tall bloke (more risk of back injury) and the work has messed his back up permanently. He's only twenty.

    Get yourself checked out. Not sure on any of the legal side of things over there but don't risk your health if you can avoid it.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    once youve fucked your back up, thats it, youre fucked for life.
    Its really NOT worth it, seriously.
    No money is worth that, youll end up disabled.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Thanks very much guys. I've an appointment with the doc tomorrow morning 11.30. So I'm going to go get checked out and see what his advice is. Cheers. :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think you should do exactly what Bongbudda said too.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    and take note of what rainbw is saying.
    you only get one spine and a very complicated one that is almost always impossible to repair. nacker it and not only does it give you pain for life but also imposes many limitations on your life choices.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    when i started my nurse training, we had a big lecture on care of your back, it was a real eye opener to see just how easy it is to damage it, just by everyday stuff that you may not even think is damaging it, but if you add bad manual handling, and lifting heavy objects incorrectly, then you are almost CERTAIN to damage yourself. It sounds like you already have probably done permanent damage, which may not manifest itself just yet necessarily, but it will.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    On a side note - do I read correctly that you've been working nights since you were 17?

    "Young workers should not ordinarily work at night, although there are certain exceptions"
    http://www.dti.gov.uk/er/work_time_regs/wtr3.htm#section3

    "If you are an employer you must offer night workers a free health assessment before they start working nights and on a regular basis while they are working nights. In many cases it will be appropriate to do this once a year, though employers can offer a health assessment more than once a year if they feel it is necessary."
    http://www.dti.gov.uk/er/work_time_regs/wtr4.htm#section4

    If your employers have been disregarding these I wouldn't trust them to stick to regulations on manual handling, or anything else much...
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