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Any views on these courses?

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
edited March 27 in Work & Study
Ok, well I just finished my first year of GCSEs (year 10), and I've started looking into what to do for my a levels. So far, I think I'm gonna do Critical Thinking, Eng. Lit, Psychology, and maybe Media or Philosophy. There doesn't seem to be many courses I'm actually interested in, tbh. I don't think I'll have any problems with getting them, as I'm predicted mainly As for my GCSEs. Can anyone suggest anything they really enjoyed doing, but was useful to them? I'm thinking along the lines of a psychology/media career.
I'd love to do Hairdressing, but I'd never use it, so I've put that to the back of my mind for now :razz:.

P.S. I'm creative, but unenthusiastic when it comes to art - more imaginative and v. good at english (all As and A*s so far). The GCSEs I'm doing atm are History, R.E. long course, Spanish (but I don't want to take that any further), Art and Design, + all the usuals.
Post edited by JustV on

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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    all i can really say is there's not really a lot of point in doing a course that you're not interested in. you need to be able to find the work interesting, imo.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    YOu do something you enjoy, are good at, and are interested in.

    I would be a traditionalist and say steer well clear of the "new" A'Level subjects, and stick with the classical ones.

    The most important thing is to be good at it, so long as you enjoy it enough to be motivated. I'd suggest you do English Language, English Literature, History and a "modern" subject such as Media Studies.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    YOu do something you enjoy, are good at, and are interested in.

    I would be a traditionalist and say steer well clear of the "new" A'Level subjects, and stick with the classical ones.

    The most important thing is to be good at it, so long as you enjoy it enough to be motivated. I'd suggest you do English Language, English Literature, History and a "modern" subject such as Media Studies.


    I would agree, but some people on these discussion boards just think i'm totally stuck up.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I would agree, but some people on these discussion boards just think i'm totally stuck up.
    Oh no, you poor dear. Bless, do you need a huggle?

    *huggletight*

    You are appearing stuck up, and you appear to know the cost of everything andf the value of nothing. I expect you are very young and you will need to learn about life the hard way.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    if you are good at english, and enjoy it, i'd seriously consider taking it, as it's a good, solid subject to have. traditional, but also useful and well-respected.

    RE might be an interesting one, or theology or whatever they do these days, especially given the political climate at the moment. it's also an essay based subject, so if you're good at english, you should sail through. and it'll keep you up to date with current affairs, which is a great asset.

    media studies gets a lot of bad press, but i think it's mostly from people who don't know what you learn, or how the workplace is evolving. by the time you graduate, i would think that a fair whack of everything, from schools to hospitals to businesses to shops, to everything, will have a website. if you can say 'as part of my media studies coursework, i built and maintained a non-profit website for 6 months' (just an example - that's what i did) you have an advantage above people who have no evidence of their internet skills. i really enjoyed media studies, and it was more challenging than i thought it would be. it's also a good confidence booster, and you learn to give presentations (prepares you for uni - people who did solely bookish subjects got a HUGE shock when they learned about presentations).

    in the end though, you do what you enjoy. you'll work harder and you'll achieve more.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    if youre interested in (film) media then i would recommend doing film studies - IF thats still an option!! i did it and i really enjoyed it! not to mention it was only one lesson a week and we got to watch films all the time, albeit some of them were complete crap ;)
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I took Psychology for A2. It's interesting but you need a good memory, as you have to remember a lot of case studies and dates. Also being fairly good at science helps, as most syllabuses require an element of scientific coursework.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    kaffrin wrote:
    you learn to give presentations

    For the very same reason I highly recommend that anbyone who gets the opportunity to should do the public speaking element of the General Studies course.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I would agree, but some people on these discussion boards just think i'm totally stuck up.

    but haven't you just agreed?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Im not sure how useful it would be to you but I did politics and absolutely loved it.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I've basically been interested in Psychology for yonks, so its an almost definate.. at the moment i'm in top set Science, and I've been getting As, Bs and Cs in my exams.

    Politics sounds interesting, but we're doing a lot of politics (i.e. the Cold War, democracy, communism etc) in History, and it bores the pants off me :/

    Is History of Art a good course? My mum took a degree in it, and said it was really interesting, but she's an artist, so... yeah.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    Oh no, you poor dear. Bless, do you need a huggle?

    *huggletight*

    You are appearing stuck up, and you appear to know the cost of everything andf the value of nothing. I expect you are very young and you will need to learn about life the hard way.


    Trust me I've learnt about life. I just find it so frustrating that I work in area area which is crying out for suitable graduates but is struggling to find any.

    And that university departments are closing down all over the country because people dont want to study sciences, etc. and that new courses are taking over - its not a way forward.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    Oh no, you poor dear. Bless, do you need a huggle?

    *huggletight*

    :lol:

    I didn't realise there was a public speaking element of General Studies. That was never offered or mentioned to me when I did it.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru

    And that university departments are closing down all over the country because people dont want to study sciences, etc. and that new courses are taking over - its not a way forward.

    why the hell not?! i fail to see why a media degree will not give someone any employability. or any other unstructured (as you call it) degree for that matter.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I just find it so frustrating that I work in area area which is crying out for suitable graduates but is struggling to find any.

    Then your company should persuade people to do science degrees.
    And that university departments are closing down all over the country because people dont want to study sciences, etc. and that new courses are taking over - its not a way forward.

    Who cares?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I didn't realise there was a public speaking element of General Studies. That was never offered or mentioned to me when I did it.

    Not many schools offer it, which is a real shame.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    My general studies was an utter shambles. WE just turned up for the exam. Public speaking sounds interesting. I'm gonna go for broke and say if you like English maybe you like languages? German for example goes well with sciencey type things such as Pyschology due to terminology (so I'm told) As for media a bunch of my friends have done it and loved it. If you think you'll enjoy it go for it. Oh for the record I've just finished and I did G&P, French, Germna, Eng Lit for year 12 then French German Eng Lit for yr 13.

    Disclaimer: The ideas I have expressed are reflective of what I've been told and some personal opinions.No one beat me:p please.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    Not many schools offer it, which is a real shame.

    sounds more fun than the attempt our college had at teaching General Studies
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:


    Who cares?


    Who cares? Sorry to worry about the British universities here, but without science departments, which offer both pure and applied sciences, the country will fail to 'generate' enough graduates for the science based professions, any this will range from a lack of science teachers, to shortages in allied medical professions, e.g. radiographers, etc.

    Any the science departments also employ more support staff than arts departments, such as lab technicians, etc, and these in term will become unemployed.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Who cares? Sorry to worry about the British universities here, but without science departments, which offer both pure and applied sciences, the country will fail to 'generate' enough graduates for the science based professions, any this will range from a lack of science teachers, to shortages in allied medical professions, e.g. radiographers, etc.

    Any the science departments also employ more support staff than arts departments, such as lab technicians, etc, and these in term will become unemployed.

    so what about if people stopped doing media degrees, surely we'd run out of people working for papers/tv etc?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    so what about if people stopped doing media degrees, surely we'd run out of people working for papers/tv etc?

    No because media jobs dont require everyone to have media degrees, there are many vocational qualifications which would allow those who are desperate to 'get on telly' to get there way.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    Oh no, you poor dear. Bless, do you need a huggle?

    *huggletight*

    You are appearing stuck up, and you appear to know the cost of everything andf the value of nothing. I expect you are very young and you will need to learn about life the hard way.


    Well I'm sorry, hopefully I'll grow up one day and be just like you.

    Sorry, I'll take that back, just checked out your profile, and i think i've experienced a little bit more of life than you.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Well I'm sorry, hopefully I'll grow up one day and be just like you.

    Sorry, I'll take that back, just checked out your profile, and i think i've experienced a little bit more of life than you.

    How'd you work that one out ? You're near as dammit the same age, both married, both working, and you know almost fuck all else about him, yet you've "experienced more life"?

    Sigh.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Well I'm sorry, hopefully I'll grow up one day and be just like you.

    Sorry, I'll take that back, just checked out your profile, and i think i've experienced a little bit more of life than you.

    Well hopefully you will just grow up heres hoping.

    But to your point are you arguing that a GNVQ is a better qualification than a degree? I mean seriously?

    Why not do a course in radiography? Surely that would make sense :crazyeyes

    Also like with most things it's a case of supply and demand. Computer Science is a rapidly growing area in universities but wait thats not a traditional science and obviously in no way affects the world does it? Surely Computer Science couldn't be invaluable in helping our country to continue to develop?

    But wait you have life experiance that is obviously serving you well. Out of curiosity what qualifications do you hold that makes you feel you can ridicule others?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru

    Why not do a course in radiography? Surely that would make sense :crazyeyes

    Aye, they are crying out for radiographers at one of our local hospitals, they were advertising for them in the waiting room.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    No because media jobs dont require everyone to have media degrees, there are many vocational qualifications which would allow those who are desperate to 'get on telly' to get there way.

    i can almost guarantee you that anyone who wants to study media would never have been a science student anyway, as they are and entirely different interest.

    the people i know who did media, or related subjects, if they had done a more traditional degree, would have chosen something like english, art, or design. if anything, they are stealing arts graduates.

    you appear to believe that sciences are better, or more worthy in some way, but you're missing totally that we need a balance of skills to function as a society. if everyone had done a science degree, who'd have designed this website we're chatting on? who'd have taught us to write in the first place?

    you will achieve nothing by trying to push people into an area of study they have no interest in.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think the point is that noone seems to be doing science degrees any more - its not the fact that everyone should do them - its more that hardly anyone is and then who will be around to design websites - find cures for diseases etc - we might all be able to write snappy sound bites but thats not the be all and end all of everything.

    Anyway back to the original point of the thread - we were also always told at school that its not worth doing new subjects at A-Level much better to specialise at university. Also as fiend said in many ways its not what you study at university that matters - unless you want to be something really specialised like a doctor - its more what university you go to and their reputation and then you can specialise at a later date.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Wyetry wrote:
    I think the point is that noone seems to be doing science degrees any more - its not the fact that everyone should do them - its more that hardly anyone is and then who will be around to design websites - find cures for diseases etc - we might all be able to write snappy sound bites but thats not the be all and end all of everything.

    Anyway back to the original point of the thread - we were also always told at school that its not worth doing new subjects at A-Level much better to specialise at university. Also as fiend said in many ways its not what you study at university that matters - unless you want to be something really specialised like a doctor - its more what university you go to and their reputation and then you can specialise at a later date.

    People still are doing science degrees though. Plenty of people. There are more choices now so some departments will get smaller but the better departments keep getting bigger.
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