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Chances

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
edited March 27 in Work & Study
What are the chances of getting a job after studying Law? I remember something was said last year in my class about the amount of people who can't find a job.
Post edited by JustV on

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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    well..... firstly, if you are looking to be a soliciter it takes more than studying law, it can take up to 6 yrs, you need degrees and most importantly work experience (at a soliciters)..... without this it will be hard as it is very competitive. Even with this, there is a low chance, as I have already stated, it is very competitive and you have to be exceptional to be chosen....... I know from looking into it myself and have chosen a back up career!
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Law is less competitive than it was a few years back, but is still highly sort after. If you know any solicitors try and get them to take you on for your articles, thats what my brother did. he had a year at my Uncles firm and then went to a family friends practice for his second year. they then took him on afterwards and he's now junior partner in the firm.

    It is getting articles thats the hardest part of qualifying in law. there are a good number of jobs available for qualified lawyers.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    What are the chances of getting a job after studying Law?
    depends on what job you want to do, really.

    do you mean a job as a lawyer?, or a job involving a good degree of legal knowledge?, or any job?

    if your idea is just a career not specifically in the legal field, then your chances are pretty much the same as everyone else's.

    if your idea is a job involving law - chances of getting a job or going onto postgraduate legal training is VERY intense indeed. and your chances of getting into such an area are rather daunting, unless, you're an exceptional candidate, as i think was said in the previous post.

    so it all depends really...
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I meant once you've go to uni, done the 3 year degree in law then the 2/3 year bar school training. After that what would the chances of actually getting a job? I know this is why alot of people end up quitting their law degrees.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    sorry but that is not what you stated, you should have been more specific but my reply would still be the same. Your chance will be the same as everyone else. As for the person who said that it is not competitive lately, I have spoken to a soliciter about all of this and it is very difficult to get into. basically, you need a job to fall back on otherwise all the courses and degrees will be for nothing and they do look for people with work experience...... its better to do an apprenticeship and work your way up.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It's hard to secure a placement with Law until you have a 1st or a 2:1

    A law degree is a good starting point for many other careers than law, however.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    A law degree is a good starter for many areas, if you have the application.

    To say that without a 2:1+ you won't get anywhere is a fallacy; a contact of mine in criminal law got a 2:2 from manchester Poly and is doing very well for himself, ta muchly.

    What you need to be doing is putting in work experience hours in vacation time, and building up contacts. With experience and contacts it is easier to get a training contract that will pay you through the one-year professional training course, and then get you established in a firm, but it is perfectly possible to do the one-year training course from personal funds and then try and find work.

    A degree doesn't guarantee you a job unless you put in the unpaid hours to get experience and contacts in the industry.

    I'm finding it hard to find work after getting a 2:2 from Durham, but that is mostly because I have little experience and I don't know what I want to do, except to know that I don't ever want to work in law.

    melodie's advice, for the record, is needlessly pessimistic and borders on the wildly inaccurate.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It also depends what kind of law you want to do.

    If you want to become a barrister, you spend a year or two doing a pupillage at the bar, so you have to be admitted to a chambers to do that - and that's pretty competitive. The best way to do it I think is to build up lots of contacts, and do as many 'mini-pupillages' as you can, ie. one- or two-week periods of work experience with a barrister in that chambers.

    If you want to join a law firm as a sollicitor, a lot of the big firms have a huge graduate intake each year and they have their own training programmes - also quite competitive, but once you're in you're in, with a pretty much guaranteed job, as they're already paying you once you start training. Work experience is v helpful for that too; you can get summer internships with these companies, usually in your 2nd year if you're studying law, or the penultimate year of any other degree.

    That's all I know - I'm not studying law, but for I while I thought I wanted to become a lawyer so I've done a couple of mini-pupillages (property law and family law), and last summer I worked with a commercial sollicitors' firm - so I don't have lots and lots of knowledge but if you want to know about these areas then give me a pm!
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    myboyfriend found it astonishingly hard and the LPC debts are still crippling us. its different for different people tho, area etc.....
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    melodie's advice, for the record, is needlessly pessimistic and borders on the wildly inaccurate.


    Maybe so but that is only what I was told by several people...... maybe they said it to deter me, which it hasn't completely. But basically most of what you said ie: work experience I mentioned that part is more important than anything. Its all very well having the degrees but it seems to me they would like people with experience as so many people want to go into that feild. I am having another career as a back up because I don't want to put in loads of work into becoming a soliciter and when i've reached it, not get work and not have anything to fall back on!
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    my man did his law degree and LPC and was then left in the cold - it is so hugely hugely hard to get to the next stage. he's now a legal executive for an insurance company now so its not all bad...its just not what he originally wanted.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    yeah, if you can get relevant work experience- do it. The earlier the better as well- these days a degree is only the first stepping stone. Employers want to know that you're not a 'wet behind the ears' student, with no experience of the real world. If you can afford to, even a few hours a week volunteering somewhere like the Citizens Advice Bureau, or unpaid work experience will show you're committed.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ha, wot are the chances of that............. 2 slags in the same room........ ha
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    go away u buffon, no one cares!!
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    melodie wrote:
    go away u buffon, no one cares!!

    If we ignore him he will go away - nect time he says something act like it isnt there - answer the previous poster...
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I am so bored right now, have no idea whtat to chat about....... how about starting a new thread any ideas?
    l
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    melodie wrote:
    go away u buffon, no one cares!!
    It's like seeing double, isn't it melodie?

    Thanks for ruining this thread.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    There are plenty of jobs, just nto always with firms and in roles people want. Everyone wants the big training deal with the big City firm, but not everyone will get one, and people have to be more prepared to start lower down, as a paralegal or a Legal executive.

    Oh, and for the record, the best degree to get into the legal industry is, in fact, a history one.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit, what do you plan to do with your degree?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Smash wrote:
    Kermit, what do you plan to do with your degree?
    A very good question, that.

    Fuck knows.

    I'm currently pissing about in date entry/admin type jobs, trying to get office experience, because I'm burned out after uni and I haven't got a clue what I want to do, or enough CV experience to do it.

    I know I don't want to work in the law, or in graduate finance, though. So that's a start.
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