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Milk

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
Does anyone think that milk might be bad for you?

I heard somewhere that it's better to buy milk and then boil it and then put it in the fridge to kill off all the bacteria.

Milk goes off pretty quicky but I've seen one called Cravendale that stays frsher longer because they stay it's more highly filtered .. I'm wondering why all milk isn't so highly filtered - although could be price - because this milk is well expensive!!

Although I do believe that they'll make more money if milk spoils and people need to buy more of it.

My parents have a holiday home abroad and when they buy milk when staying there they always boil it once they take it home to be on the safe side!!

Does anyone drink milk alternatives like goat's milk or soya milk?

I tried goats milk once but it smelled so bad I couldn't stand it!!

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i think a certain amount of bacteria in the diet is good, it helps keep the immune system alert:)

    i think that if the milk smells bad, then dont drink it... simple as that!

    people are too worried about getting bacteria into their system... yes, over a certain amount isnt good, and certain types are very bad for you but in small quantities they dont do much harm;)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    exactly.

    Anyways, i don't drink milk, as i'm lactose intolerant. It all smells bad :p
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think people with crones and other digestive diseases benefit from drinking milk that has been boiled first - I have probiotic yogurt to get some good bacteria into my system.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Re: Milk
    Originally posted by DiamondGeezer

    I heard somewhere that it's better to buy milk and then boil it and then put it in the fridge to kill off all the bacteria.


    thats called 'pasteurisation' they do it anyway before you even buy the milk, no point in doing it again:)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Like everything we consume there's good and bad things to the food
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    can't see the point in boiling it again
    I drink soya milk - you get used to the taste, in fact in tea I don't notice the difference.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Re: Re: Milk
    Originally posted by Char_Baby
    thats called 'pasteurisation' they do it anyway before you even buy the milk, no point in doing it again:)

    So what's the different between that and UHT?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i dont know!! read the labels!!! :p
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Re: Re: Re: Milk
    Originally posted by DiamondGeezer
    So what's the different between that and UHT?

    UHT = ultra heat treated. This is self explanatory and they do it so that it`ll keep till doomsday without refrigeration until you open it.

    Milk is pasteurised, as someone else said, apart from raw, untreated milk, and I don`t know where you`d get that from unless you lived on a farm. Believe me if they recommend small children and pregnant women to drink it it`s unlikely to do you any harm.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    milks good for you, its a brilliant source of calcium and vitamin D and it also has a lot of other vitamins in it too. If you dont want to drink milk then you should make sure you get enough calcium from other sources such as a calcium enriched soya milk or I think sesame seeds are supposed to be quite a good source too. For the price of it, I think milk is a good value healthy drink, and much better for you than any soft drink you can buy.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Re: Re: Milk
    Originally posted by Char_Baby
    thats called 'pasteurisation' they do it anyway before you even buy the milk, no point in doing it again:)

    I thought that was sterilization - there is a difference between sterilised & pasturised milk I'm sure
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Have a read of this:

    http://www.actionresearch.co.uk/news_media/chrons_press/r24.1.00.php

    BUGS IN MILK CAUSE CROHN'S DISEASE

    A bug present in retail pasteurised milk in the UK causes Crohn's disease, a leading medical researcher at St George's Medical School, London claims today.

    The bug, an organism known as MAP (Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis), is not completely killed by normal milk pasteurisation methods and is present in people with Crohn's disease.

    Professor John Hermon-Taylor, who has been funded by medical research charity Action Research, states "The problems currently caused by MAP in the milk supply constitute a public health disaster of tragic proportions for which a range of remedial measures are urgently needed, and for which the government must take responsibility".

    He added "Both through our own work and new research evidence from the USA I am absolutely certain that MAP causes a substantial proportion of Crohn's disease".

    Professor Hermon-Taylor will detail his evidence at Action Research's annual presentation to the Medical Journalists Association at The Royal Society of Medicine, London on 24 January 2000.

    MAP is a specific member of the class of organism known as Mycobacteria, of which the tuberculosis and leprosy organisms are the most notorious members. MAP contains fragments of foreign DNA that has converted it from a harmless organism into a pathogen.

    Crohn's disease severely affects an unknown number of people, believed to be up to 80,000 people in the UK. It is thought that there are 4000 - 8000 new cases every year. These figures will remain uncertain until the government makes the disease notifiable (i.e. collects statistics upon diagnosis).

    It is estimated to cost the nation as much as £240 million each year in direct health care costs alone.

    The evidence is as follows:

    1. The organism can live in cattle and other animals for years without causing visible disease.

    2. The dairy herd prevalence of sub-clinical infection (i.e. where the disease is present but not apparent) with MAP in Western Europe and North America is reported to be in the range of 21-54%.

    3. Sub-clinically infected dairy cows (i.e. those cows that do not appear diseased) secrete MAP into their milk and onto pastures.

    4. MAP is tougher than tuberculosis and is not completely inactivated by pasteurisation (i.e. 72 degrees for fifteen seconds).

    5. Residual MAP is present in retail pasteurised milk in the UK.

    6. MAP is probably present in some areas, in water supplies.

    7. MAP is a specific cause of chronic infection of the intestines in very many animals including, so far, four types of primates.

    8. MAP can be detected by improved culture systems and DNA tests in the inflamed gut of a high proportion of people with Crohn's disease. This is confirmed from recent work from St. George's Hospital, London and the University of Central Florida.

    9. Preliminary studies in the US have isolated MAP from the breast milk of women with Crohn's who have recently given birth but not from women who do not have Crohn's. (The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 2000)

    10. Recent evidence from a top research group in Los Angeles led by Dr Jonathan Braun has shown that nine out of ten people with Crohn's disease have antibodies in their blood which recognise a specific mycobacterial (MYCO) protein in MAP. (Infection and Immunity 1999; 67:6510-6517)

    11. MAP is difficult to kill with antibiotic drugs but a new treatment developed at St George's Hospital, London using antibiotics active against MAP has shown that a substantial proportion of Crohn's disease patients get better, some lastingly. A randomised controlled trial of this treatment throughout Australia began in September 1999.

    The following remedial measures need to be considered and implemented:

    1. To reverse the decision to allow the sale of unpasteurised milk in the UK.

    2. To increase the stringency of milk pasteurisation.

    3. To test dairy herds for MAP using an up-to-date molecular techniques.

    4. To carry out detailed research for MAP in the environment and water supplies.

    5. To make Crohn's disease a notifiable condition.

    6. To sequence the DNA Genome of MAP of both the cattle and human strain.

    7. To develop therapeutic vaccines for humans, and preventative vaccines for animals.

    Action Research has funded Professor John Hermon-Taylor's pioneering research into the disease for over 20 years at St George's Hospital Medical School, London. Action Research has funded four research projects into Crohn's disease since 1979, a total spend of over £ _ million.

    The research developed new methods for testing for the bug and indicated its presence both in milk and in humans.

    Crohn's disease is not a killer but it does ruin the lives of sufferers. Symptoms include chronic diarrhoea, daily abdominal pain, weight loss, extreme tiredness and psychological problems.

    Anne Luther, director general of Action Research, said "The extent of this problem appears far greater than CJD and Aids in the UK, yet previous calls for government action appear to have gone unheeded".

    For further help please contact Mike Deyes at Action Research on 01403 327429.

    Notes for editors:

    1. A case study of Crohn's disease sufferer is available.

    2. Action Research is dedicated to preventing and treating disease and disability by funding vital medical research.

    3. Founded in 1952 by Duncan Guthrie, Action Research is one of the UK's leading medical research charities. We support research into a wide range of conditions benefiting all age groups. We are currently supporting around 160 projects, a total commitment of over £14 million.

    4. Our support has been crucial in the development and use of ultrasound scans in pregnancy, the UK vaccines against polio and rubella (German measles), hip replacements and the use of folic acid to prevent spina bifida.

    5. Current grants include research into meningitis, e.coli, osteoporosis, facial reconstruction, epilepsy and incontinence.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I've drunk milk all my life and I'm alright... :D
    I tried Soya milk once and it was well gakky.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Thats interesting Diamondgeezer, my dads girlfriend has crohns and she cant have dairy products as they make her crohns flare up terribly.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think the way they feed cows must have a bearing on the milk produced?

    Cows are now longer allowed to roam the fields and chew grass - they now feed them the remains of other animals - forgot what's it's called now but it's the way they reckon the cow got Mad Cow Disease by eating the brains of infected sheep, etc.

    Boiling normal milk makes it last way longer before it goes off - which must mean that normal milk has loads of bacteria swimming in it to make it go off inthe first place - some might be good but just as likely some might be bad for you.

    I think with the way cows are being fed and turned into meat eaters we should worry not just about the meat but about the milk.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I agree with you about milk production Diamond Geezer, thats why I usually buy organic milk, because they have very strict guidelines on animal welfare and what the animal eats, and wont routinely use artificial hormones and antibiotics. I think its worth the extra 20p for a 4pint bottle, that it costs to buy organic, for the peace of mind.
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