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TheSite.org Book Club - Nominations for August's book (Special Nostalgia Edition!)

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
In August, Book Club is going all nostalgic! We want you to nominate the books you remember and loved from your childhood. Now, obviously we aren't talking The Very Hungry Caterpillar (sorry!), but Roald Dahl, Michael Morpurgo, Black Beauty, etc.? Perfect!

I'm not sure what kind of restrictions I can put on this, but anything which doesn't really fit into the age range that sits between kind of 4-7 and Young Adult won't really be considered.

Reminder of the rules:

1. Anybody can nominate a book.
2. Books nominated have to be fiction (or biographical), but there are no other restrictions. You can go for whatever genre you like, whatever time period, whichever author.
3. Try not to pick anything too hefty. While some of us could probably get through War and Peace in a month, others aren't so fast.
4. Nominations in the below example format, please:

Book: Snuff by Terry Pratchett|Kindle Edition

Synopsis: It is a truth universally acknowledged that a policeman taking a holiday would barely have had time to open his suitcase before he finds his first corpse.

And Commander Sam Vimes of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch is on holiday in the pleasant and innocent countryside, but not for him a mere body in the wardrobe. There are many, many bodies and an ancient crime more terrible than murder.

He is out of his jurisdiction, out of his depth, out of bacon sandwiches, occasionally snookered and out of his mind, but never out of guile. Where there is a crime there must be a finding, there must be a chase and there must be a punishment.

They say that in the end all sins are forgiven.

But not quite all...
From Amazon

Reason for Nomination: Any reason you like can go here. The above is an example, and was our book for March, so no nominating!

5. As I did above, if there is a Kindle/e-reader edition, put a separate link to that, please (On Amazon, there is a "Start reading [book] on your Kindle..." link under the image).

Commence nominations! Poll will be put up in one week with all nominations. And just a reminder that Book Club chat will now be running monthly - the next one will be in August for July's book, Freakonomics (picc - we still going for post-Olympics?).

Franki

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Velveteen Motherfucking Rabbit. Best book ever. Though a bit depressing for children :p

    http://www.amazon.com/Velveteen-Rabbit-Ears-Classic-Spotlight/dp/1591977576

    Too many beers to fill out the rest.
  • **helen****helen** Mod malarkist Posts: 9,235 Listening Ear
    Love Velveteen rabbit :heart: does it not fit the 4-7 category though?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    **helen** wrote: »
    Love Velveteen rabbit :heart: does it not fit the 4-7 category though?

    I think it would :(

    Sorry Manda!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'd like to nominate all of Roald Dahl's books! But I'll just stick to one.

    James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl | Kindle Edition

    Although I'm sure there are loads of copies lying around.

    Synopsis (from Amazon): When poor James Henry Trotter loses his parents in a horrible rhinoceros accident, he is forced to live with his two wicked aunts, Aunt Sponge and Aunt Spiker. After three years he becomes "the saddest and loneliest boy you could find". Then one day, a wizened old man in a dark-green suit gives James a bag of magic crystals that promise to reverse his misery forever. When James accidentally spills the crystals on his aunts' withered peach tree, he sets the adventure in motion. From the old tree a single peach grows, and grows, and grows some more, until finally James climbs inside the giant fruit and rolls away from his despicable aunts to a whole new life. James befriends an assortment of hilarious characters, including Grasshopper, Earthworm, Miss Spider and Centipede--each with his or her own song to sing.....

    Reason: I love peaches and travelling/having adventures - maybe all thanks to this book!?

    :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ah crap, I read it wrong, I thought you said it had to be for ages 4-7!

    In that case, I'll go with my original thought of Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach.

    e book link thingy

    This is a story for people who follow their hearts and make their own rules...people who get special pleasure out of doing something well, even if only for themselves...people who know there's more to this living than meets the eye: they?ll be right there with Jonathan, flying higher and faster than ever they dreamed.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Book: Watership Down by Richard Adams|Kindle Edition

    Synopsis: 'Watership Down' is the exciting and emotional tale where a group of rabbits are forced to leave their Sandleford homes when Fiver, who often sees visions of the future, tells them that their warren is in danger from humans. The group is then lead by Hazel and Bigwig as they make their way through the fields of Hampshire as they come face to face with danger from other animals such as rats, foxes, cats, dogs and owls as well as humans and cars. As the story goes on Hazel and the group of rabbits try to rescue some rabbits from a farm; help a bird, who in turn then helps them; join another warren of rabbits and also try to steal does from a much bigger and powerful warren known as Efrafa, leading to a shocking and brilliant finalle. Along the way tales are told of El-ahrairah (prince of a thousand enemies), which gives more insight into the beliefs of the rabbits in their own world.

    As someone who usually mainly reads crime fiction and horror (and have also never seen the movie adaption), I never thought that I'd enjoy a book about a bunch of rabbits but after a strong recommendation from my girlfriend, I gave this a try and once I started it I couldn't put it down. Immediately I fell in love with Hazel, Fiver, Bigwig, Pipkin, Dandelion, Speedwell, Blackberry, Silver, Buckthorn, Holly, Bluebell and Strawberry. Each and everyone of them has their individual characteristics and I found that I actually cared quite a lot what happened to them, and got quite emotional at certain points in the story.

    Although this dubbed a children's novel, I found it to be quite complex at times and also quite gruesome and horrifying in parts, which I could imagine may be quite disturbing for younger readers. Overall though this is a brilliant read that took me no time at all to get through it's 480 pages and is one that I'll definitely read again. Without a doubt this is a classic that everyone should give a go, even if you think that a book about rabbits wouldn't be your kind of thing.
    From Amazon reviews

    Reason for Nomination: Watership Down has been my favourite book from the moment I picked it up. Everyone needs to read it and love it.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Book: Charlotte's Web by E.B. White|Not available on Kindle

    Synopsis: This is a beautifully-written story of a little girl, a pig and a spider who become loyal friends and how Charlotte, the intelligent spider, weaves her web to turn fate and rescue the pig from the dinner table. The vocabulary is great, fulsome and stretching for children used to Rainbow Fairies and Horrid Henry, and there's an underlying current of the passing of time, seasons, life and death. Written in the 1950s in America the book reflects an era perhaps gone-by where the world moves at a slower pace and yet the harsh realities of farm life and natural history are less hidden from children. If you are planning on reading Charlotte's Web to a child just moving on from the absolute innocence of early childhood, do be prepared for a couple of upsets: my daughter (6) was horrified at the thought that Wilbur, the runt of the litter and so hand reared for the first month, would be fattened up for the dinner table, and heartbroken when the heroine of the piece, the spider Charlotte, came to the end of her natural life, despite her having admirably achieved what she had set out to do. That said, we both thoroughly enjoyed this wholesome and memorable read and I thoroughly recommend it for 6+.
    From Amazon reviews

    Reason for Nomination: Recommended by my mummy - this was one of my favourite movies when I was little but I'm not sure if I ever read the book.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Book: The Sheep-Pig by Dick King-Smith|Not available on Kindle

    Synopsis: When Babe, the little orphaned piglet, is won at a fair by Farmer Hogget, he is adopted by Fly, the kind-hearted sheep-dog. Babe is determined to learn everything he can from Fly. He knows he can't be a sheep-dog. But maybe, just maybe, he might be a sheep-pig.
    From Amazon

    Reason for Nomination: Because it's awesome, that's why.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Just a reminder guys that you have two more days to put your nominations in! Flow - I'm sure you had a few you were going to nominate :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    :chin: Hey

    Book: Born To Run
    Authour: Michael Morpurgo
    Synopsis: The bag wasn't just drifting gently along, it was turning of it's own accord. There was something inside it, squeaking and squealing in terror. Patrick didn't think about it. He shrugged off his school bag and leaped into the canal.

    For Best Mate, being rescued from drowning as a young puppy is only the start of his adventures. From unwanted burden to favourite companion, and from pet to champion race dog, this remarkable greyhound proves that it's not just cats who have more than one life. Cast aside, kidnapped, adopted or living rough on the streets, Best Mate can always find a way to survive. But will he ever find a real home?

    (source- http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1948120.Born_To_Run)

    Reasons For Nomination- Read this when i was younger and when i was looking at books for my younger brother in the library came across this and it brought back the memories of suspense and tension and the feeling of being stuck and drawn into the book even as a child

    ... More suggestions to come :chin:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Book- Shadow
    Author- Michael Morpurgo
    Synopsis- A stunning and moving novel from Michael Morpurgo, the nation’s favourite storyteller – featuring the bravest dog in all the world…

    This is the story of Aman, as told in his own words – a boy from Afghanistan fleeing the horror of the Afghan war. When a western dog shows up outside the caves where Aman lives with his mother, Aman is initially repulsed – it is not customary for people to keep dogs as pets in his part of the world. But when Aman and his mother finally decide to make a bid for freedom, the dog Aman has called Shadow will not leave their side. Soon it becomes clear: the destinies of boy and dog are linked, and always will be…

    (source- http://michaelmorpurgo.com/books/shadow)

    Reason For Nomination- Awesome book! read it to my little brother when hes was little and ended up reading it myself because he wasnt intrested in it at all! Tense and heartwarming this story was entertainment :thumb:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The Giver

    I remember reading this in middle school or something. It is like a young persons verson of 1984. I thought it was awesome.

    I don't know where the fuck you find your synopsis, because amazon only gives me about one sentence, but here it is...

    Twelve-year-old Jonas lives in a seemingly ideal world. Not until he is given his life assignment as the Receiver does he begin to understand the dark secrets behind this fragile community
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You have about 7 hours to nominate guys - will be putting up the poll when I get home from work :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    (Nominating on behalf of piccolo)

    Book: My Friend Walter by Michael Morpurgo|Kindle Edition

    Synopsis: When Bess meets the ghost of Walter Raleigh - an ancestor - he follows her home. Chaos ensues as he tries to live with Bess and her family, but there is more at stake than they realise.

    Reason for Nomination: I was a history geek as a kid and loved the concept and the silliness!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    (Nominating on behalf of piccolo)

    Book: The Eagle of the Ninth by Rosemary Sutcliffe|Kindle Edition

    Synopsis: Marcus Aquila is stationed on the northernmost border of the Roman Empire in the mid-first-century AD. Twenty years earlier, his father crossed the border to Caledonia and the ninth legion was lost. M.Aquila is determined to solve the mystery and restore his father's reputation.
    This is the first in a trilogy of stories about the Roman garrisons along the border of Britannia.

    Reason for Nomination: I loved the adventure as a kid - as an adult, and now I've studied Roman Britain, I appreciate the detail and accuracy of Sutcliffe's work.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    (Nominating on behalf of piccolo)

    Book: Winnie the Pooh and the House at Pooh Corner by AA Milne|Kindle Edition

    Synopsis: Pooh and Piglet are adventuring again with their friends in Hundred Acre Wood.Tigger finds out what Tiggers like, Piglet does a Very Grand Thing and Christopher Robin and Pooh discover a wonderful Enchanted Place.
    (from Amazon)

    Reason for Nomination: When I was little this was a real favourite. My granny had a recording of Alan Bennet reading it which we used to listen to when she was sick. There is also a lot of subtle humour in the book that I discovered as a teenager and I love the dry wit.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    three nominations from me (all quotes taken from amazon)

    catcher in the rye by jd salinger
    The Catcher in Rye is the ultimate novel for disaffected youth, but it's relevant to all ages. The story is told by Holden Caulfield, a seventeen- year-old dropout who has just been kicked out of his fourth school. Throughout, Holden dissects the 'phony' aspects of society, and the 'phonies' themselves: the headmaster whose affability depends on the wealth of the parents, his roommate who scores with girls using sickly-sweet affection.

    Lazy in style, full of slang and swear words, it's a novel whose interest and appeal comes from its observations rather than its plot intrigues (in conventional terms, there is hardly any plot at all). Salinger's style creates an effect of conversation, it is as though Holden is speaking to you personally, as though you too have seen through the pretences of the American Dream and are growing up unable to see the point of living in, or contributing to, the society around you.



    the perks of being a wallflower by stephen chbosky
    This is the story of what it's like to grow up in high school. More intimate than a diary, Charlie's letters are singular and unique, hilarious and devastating. We may not know where he lives. We may not know to whom he is writing. All we know is the world he shares. Caught between trying to live his life and trying to run from it puts him on a strange course through uncharted territory. The world of first dates and mixed tapes, family dramas and new friends. The world of sex, drugs, and "The Rocky Horror Picture Show, " when all one requires is that perfect song on that perfect drive to feel infinite.



    and i think this would be really interesting as the film is coming out soon... the hobbit by jrr tolkien
    The Hobbit is the unforgettable story of Bilbo, a peace-loving hobbit, who embarks on a strange and magical adventure.
    A timeless classic.

    Bilbo Baggins enjoys a quiet and contented life, with no desire to travel far from the comforts of home; then one day the wizard Gandalf and a band of dwarves arrive unexpectedly and enlist his services – as a burglar – on a dangerous expedition to raid the treasure-hoard of Smaug the dragon. Bilbo’s life is never to be the same again.

    Seldom has any book been so widely read and loved as J.R.R. Tolkien’s classic tale, ‘The Hobbit’. Since its first publication in 1937 it has remained in print to delight each new generation of readers all over the world, and its hero, Bilbo Baggins, has taken his place among the ranks of the immortals of fiction
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ooooh I was thinking about nominating The Hobbit but wasn't sure it fit. Have decided between picc and me that it can be let in, though :D.

    Don't think the other two can be, because we were kind of going for books aimed at children (or at least not aimed at adults). Sorry :(. Maybe we can have a "coming of age" type theme one month in the future :). Or you can nominate them next month - I'd definitely vote for both :)
  • **helen****helen** Mod malarkist Posts: 9,235 Listening Ear
    Oooh, just in the nick of time - I nominate The Runaways by Ruth Thomas.
    This book is the compelling and unique story of two children, Julian and Nathan, from inner city London. Outsiders at school and unhappy at home, the two are strangely drawn together. They stumble across some money with which they try to buy friendship in their class, but with teachers and parents closing in the two are forced to run away. The story centres on the brilliant and unusual friendship that develops between these two children, thrown together by force of circumstance.

    A hard-hitting, well-crafted story of great emotional range that has an important message about personal growth and friendship, this novel is suitable for strong readers between the ages of 10 and 12.

    Tis available on Kindle and old school copy ;)

    Read and re-read when I was 9,10,11 and 12ish... I remember it having a somewhat romanticised view of running away, but I often felt like I wanted to and imagined how I would based on their experiences.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Both Catcher in the Rye and The Perks of Being a Wallflower are for teens, so' young adult'. I studied both in the module Childhood and Adolescence at uni.

    edit: just saw earlier confusion, it does look like you're saying the restriction is aged 4-7 or has to be classed as 'young adult' to be considered. is it the opposite?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Both Catcher in the Rye and The Perks of Being a Wallflower are for teens, so' young adult'. I studied both in the module Childhood and Adolescence at uni.

    edit: just saw earlier confusion, it does look like you're saying the restriction is aged 4-7 or has to be classed as 'young adult' to be considered. is it the opposite?

    Yeah, sorry, my sentence structure skills were apparently a bit fail when I wrote that.

    It's supposed to be in between those two age ranges.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    .
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The vocabulary is great, fulsome and stretching for children used to Rainbow Fairies and Horrid Henry.

    Can I just say, as a bookseller and a kid who read endlessly, I can't help but hate the rainbow fairies! They just churn them out (4 due for publication this year alone) and they're not great writing. At least they get kids reading, I guess...
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