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Bad weather alert

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
In Hong Kong they have a system where if there's a hurricane or something approaching they announce it on the news, radio, internet, etc and if it's over a certain number you don't have to go to work or school that day.

Given today's weather shouldn't we have some kind of similar system in place?
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Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Not for a couple of inches of snow, no.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    8 inches isn't a couple...and its still coming down...

    uni will be closed tomorrow as well by the looks of it

    btw, the met office does announce it via the web, news on tv and in the papers and on the radio...and shouldn't it be the own person's choice to decide if they go into work or not?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    We've got a couple of inches of snow here in Brighton and my office has dropped from about 18 people to 6. :D
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I don't get how they weren't prepared for this.
  • JsTJsT Posts: 18,268 Skive's The Limit
    Namaste wrote: »
    I don't get how they weren't prepared for this.
    Who?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It always makes me laugh when a couple of inches of snow and the country grinds to a halt, yet in Canada, Russia and Northern USA they regularly have feet of snow and still manage to carry on.

    I've been at work today, and yes it's been difficult in some places but as long as people take it steady everything is still working.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Whowhere wrote: »
    It always makes me laugh when a couple of inches of snow and the country grinds to a halt, yet in Canada, Russia and Northern USA they regularly have feet of snow and still manage to carry on.

    I've been at work today, and yes it's been difficult in some places but as long as people take it steady everything is still working.

    I was in New York just before Xmas and there was between half a foot and a foot of snow everywhere. Our flight home was only delayed by two hours!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Given that this is the worse snow for eighteen years in London (and in many years we get little or none) I'd say it was a perfectly rationale decision not to buy in loads of expensive kit which will be sitting unused since 1991
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Given that this is the worse snow for eighteen years in London (and in many years we get little or none) I'd say it was a perfectly rationale decision not to buy in loads of expensive kit which will be sitting unused since 1991

    Ooooooh, hark at the civil servant! :p
  • SkiveSkive Posts: 15,283 Skive's The Limit
    Given that this is the worse snow for eighteen years in London (and in many years we get little or none) I'd say it was a perfectly rationale decision not to buy in loads of expensive kit which will be sitting unused since 1991

    Exactly. Canada doesn't grind to a halt because they have to deal with it every year and the machines and infrastructure used to combat it is a a worthwhile investment.

    People shouldn't be a going anywhere they don't really have to, it's dangerousl.
    Weekender Offender 
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Today has shown clear evidence that this country really is run by morons at every level. They really are an complete and utter embarrassment. Can these people be trusted to run anything without fucking it up? We have been expecting snow storms like this for nearly a week now - the Met Office was warning as early as last Tuesday about Siberian winds coming towards the UK. Our local authorities have had all that time to put preparations in place, they have had 6 days to get ready for the onslaught. So what happens?

    The usual. Our capital city has come to a bloody standstill. The London Underground's on a hopelessly reduced service, the buses are barely running, people were having to walk several miles to work. And this on the day that the Chinese Prime Minister was busy visiting Jonah Brown in Downing Street! We must be a total laughing stock to the people of Beijing. A little bit of snow and half the country's come to a halt.

    Whole swathes of the USA get this kind of weather all the time. The same in Canada. Has nobody in local government actually thought it might be a good idea to ask these people how they keep their transport systems running smoothly during heavy snow? Heck, we could even ask the Russians about it! In any other country, this would cause uproar. Here, it's tolerated - because it continues to happen again, and again, and again...

    UPDATE: Amusing quote from London mayor Boris Johnson. Speaking to Radio 2 today about the bad weather, he said "We have the right kind of snow, just the wrong quantity". What would we do without Boris, eh?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    A few people at my workplace offered car-sharing, but everyone turned up. We had 2".
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    stargalaxy wrote: »
    tl;dr

    But wouldn't you also write a tirade if the government spend billions on infrastructure suited to a once every other decade occurance?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    minimi38 wrote: »
    But wouldn't you also write a tirade if the government spend billions on infrastructure suited to a once every other decade occurance?

    I'm pretty sure he would. :yes: I'm thinking that besides death and taxes, SG is becoming one of life's guarantees ;)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    minimi38 wrote: »
    But wouldn't you also write a tirade if the government spend billions on infrastructure suited to a once every other decade occurance?
    It's not going to cost billions of pounds to keep the traffic running during the snow. Besides, the cost to the economy because of all the problems is far greater. So I would have no problem if local authorities and government invested to make sure they could deal with it. I'd be the first to praise them if they got it right - though they sure as hell don't make it easy to do.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    stargalaxy wrote: »
    Today has shown clear evidence that this country really is run by morons at every level. They really are an complete and utter embarrassment. Can these people be trusted to run anything without fucking it up? We have been expecting snow storms like this for nearly a week now - the Met Office was warning as early as last Tuesday about Siberian winds coming towards the UK. Our local authorities have had all that time to put preparations in place, they have had 6 days to get ready for the onslaught. So what happens?

    The usual. Our capital city has come to a bloody standstill. The London Underground's on a hopelessly reduced service, the buses are barely running, people were having to walk several miles to work. And this on the day that the Chinese Prime Minister was busy visiting Jonah Brown in Downing Street! We must be a total laughing stock to the people of Beijing. A little bit of snow and half the country's come to a halt.

    Whole swathes of the USA get this kind of weather all the time. The same in Canada. Has nobody in local government actually thought it might be a good idea to ask these people how they keep their transport systems running smoothly during heavy snow? Heck, we could even ask the Russians about it! In any other country, this would cause uproar. Here, it's tolerated - because it continues to happen again, and again, and again...

    UPDATE: Amusing quote from London mayor Boris Johnson. Speaking to Radio 2 today about the bad weather, he said "We have the right kind of snow, just the wrong quantity". What would we do without Boris, eh?


    SG, haven't you read anyone else's posts?
    The USA/Canada/Russia cope with this sort of thing because they have the infrastructure to deal with it. They have bad winters all the time. For us the cost of buying and maintaining the equipment will be far more than the cost of shutting up shop for a couple of days, considering we only ever have snow like this every 10-15 years or so. Honestly, the last time I can remember weather like this was way back in the very early 90's when I was 7/8 years old. Buying snow-ploughs e.t.c. isn't cost-effective. As long as the emergency services can get through (which we can, because thanks to the Civil contingencies act every police force has to have a pool of 4x4 vehicles scattered around) then who cares if some rich city bankers can't get to work and make a few more million quid?
  • SkiveSkive Posts: 15,283 Skive's The Limit
    stargalaxy wrote: »
    It's not going to cost billions of pounds to keep the traffic running during the snow. Besides, the cost to the economy because of all the problems is far greater. So I would have no problem if local authorities and government invested to make sure they could deal with it. I'd be the first to praise them if they got it right - though they sure as hell don't make it easy to do.

    Come off it. If the government forked out millions for the purcahse and upkeep of machnes to combat conditions that only appear once every couple of decades you'd be the first to whinge.
    Weekender Offender 
  • JsTJsT Posts: 18,268 Skive's The Limit
    stargalaxy wrote: »
    The London Underground's on a hopelessly reduced service, the buses are barely running, people were having to walk several miles to work. And this on the day that the Chinese Prime Minister was busy visiting Jonah Brown in Downing Street! We must be a total laughing stock to the people of Beijing. A little bit of snow and half the country's come to a halt.

    Parts of the Underground and domestic networks have been under upto 5 FOOT of snow today due to snow drifts, its not that easy. London's mainline routes were heavily affected by staff simply being unable to get into work as roads were unpassable and nightbuses suspended. A friend of mine was meant to start work at London Waterloo at 4am, the nightbuses were all suspended and with the tube in disarray he finally arrived at 9am to be one of the only ones who had managed to make it in, drivers and train crew simply stuck.

    Most Northern town and cities (especially East of the Pennines) have had a good 2-4inches and we've managed to run a near normal service (around 80% punctuality). The rail and LU networks can cope with normal snow levels much better than any other form of land transport but when faced with the snow levels today and other transport collapsing around it rail has suffered.

    Hopefully we will see much improved service tomorrow.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    On a lighter note, with all this snow about, me and the boyfriend had a snowball fight last night. I won ..... in the end, he swallowed.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    JsT wrote: »
    Parts of the Underground and domestic networks have been under upto 5 FOOT of snow today due to snow drifts, its not that easy. London's mainline routes were heavily affected by staff simply being unable to get into work as roads were unpassable and nightbuses suspended. A friend of mine was meant to start work at London Waterloo at 4am, the nightbuses were all suspended and with the tube in disarray he finally arrived at 9am to be one of the only ones who had managed to make it in, drivers and train crew simply stuck.

    Most Northern town and cities (especially East of the Pennines) have had a good 2-4inches and we've managed to run a near normal service (around 80% punctuality). The rail and LU networks can cope with normal snow levels much better than any other form of land transport but when faced with the snow levels today and other transport collapsing around it rail has suffered.

    Hopefully we will see much improved service tomorrow.

    Exactly. My branch of the District Line and the whole of the Circle Line are still closed at the moment. Taking the opportunity to work from home again - although some people seem to think this is a slack option. It was either sit on the bus for over an hour, or get on with some urgent work. I know which I would pick, every time.
  • SkiveSkive Posts: 15,283 Skive's The Limit
    Teagan wrote: »
    On a lighter note, with all this snow about, me and the boyfriend had a snowball fight last night. I won ..... in the end, he swallowed.

    :yuck:
    Weekender Offender 
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Skive wrote: »
    :yuck:

    :lol: It was a joke ....
  • SkiveSkive Posts: 15,283 Skive's The Limit
    Teagan wrote: »
    :lol: It was a joke ....

    I know but still. :)
    Weekender Offender 
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    g_angel wrote: »
    Exactly. My branch of the District Line and the whole of the Circle Line are still closed at the moment. Taking the opportunity to work from home again - although some people seem to think this is a slack option. It was either sit on the bus for over an hour, or get on with some urgent work. I know which I would pick, every time.

    Rich is the only one from his team who made it into the office both today and yesterday because all of them are from out of London except him. None of the others (rightly so!), including his boss, wanted to risk getting stuck in London again.

    It's not as easy as preparing for it, either. There was salt up and down the road outside Rich's flat on Sunday night (before the snow started) - largely because it's a main route for ambulances. It was on the pavement as well, but by yesterday morning, when the snow outside his front door was more than ankle-deep, there was no salt left to be seen because of how heavy the snow was. It had landed, melted on the salt, then more snow had turned that into ice and just landed on top of it. I'm taking the risk of it not snowing tonight and getting up at godawful-am tomorrow to get to my lecture because I know if I go outside I'll fall over and, knowing me, land on my only-just-starting-to-feel-better wrist again.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    stargalaxy wrote: »
    It's not going to cost billions of pounds to keep the traffic running during the snow. Besides, the cost to the economy because of all the problems is far greater. So I would have no problem if local authorities and government invested to make sure they could deal with it. I'd be the first to praise them if they got it right - though they sure as hell don't make it easy to do.

    In countries that keep things running in less-than-ideal weather, it's not just the government that takes care of it. Where I live almost everybody owns an extra set of tyres and those that don't purchase them/put them under tend to be the ones that block traffic and slow things down. So annoying. Then there's other smaller stuff people purchase to make it so that they can get to work.
    Besides, the first day of bad weather is never smooth. There's always delays and things are bound to take more time.

    It's simply not cost efficient to prepare for every rare occurance that might slow things down or interrupt businesses. Where I live it is cost efficient because the cost of not doing it will be higher.

    It was amusing to see a picture of UK police officers with shovels on the front page of today's newspaper here. Not what the police here has to do. :D
  • JsTJsT Posts: 18,268 Skive's The Limit
    g_angel wrote: »
    Exactly. My branch of the District Line and the whole of the Circle Line are still closed at the moment. Taking the opportunity to work from home again - although some people seem to think this is a slack option. It was either sit on the bus for over an hour, or get on with some urgent work. I know which I would pick, every time.

    Circle Line is an easy way to close when problems occur as its pretty much all covered by other routes if needs be. As the day goes on today we're getting more mainline stuff back, almost back to normal in most places but a lot of people again aren't going into work.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    JsT wrote: »
    Circle Line is an easy way to close when problems occur as its pretty much all covered by other routes if needs be. As the day goes on today we're getting more mainline stuff back, almost back to normal in most places but a lot of people again aren't going into work.

    Yup - I have to go to Earl's Court (or Gloucester Road) and change to the District Line to Stamford Brook. It's not a long journey, but I would prefer to work at home than seek alternative means which would undoubtedly double or triple the journey time.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think most of the people we're missing are people with kids who's schools are closed.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    can't argue with that... although I am sure StarGalaxy will no doubt have a rant about how Gordon Brown failed to keep the schools open, hence causing workers to have to take time off, hence affecting the economy etc. DAMN THAT GORDON, DAMN HIM etc etc.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Jaloux wrote: »
    Besides, the first day of bad weather is never smooth. There's always delays and things are bound to take more time.
    Never said I was expecting everything to run completely smoothly. In adverse weather conditions, some delays are inevitable. For example, in heavy rain where there is poor visibility, you're inevitably gonna have to slow down. Perfectly happy to accept that. But shutting down almost the entire transport system of London because of a few inches of snow? That simply isn't good enough. Boris Johnson has a lot to answer for.

    I've been watching local weather reports (Wales) and they're now saying that parts of the country are now running low on grit and salt. Honestly...
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