being on incapacity benefit?

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
My social worker wants me to go onto incapacity benefit, as she feels thats i'm not well enough to be working over the summer with my fits, and Ibs, and ptsd.

I understand why shes said that, but i really want to become a valid part of society, and be working and paying taxes and doing something this summer, rather than sitting on my arse. I understand that i'm not well, but it feels like i'm taking a step back not a step forward, and i feel really weird about asking the doctor to write me off sick for six months- the length of time the social worker asked to ask for.

I'm not really too sure what to do about it really...

help?

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think it would be a shame for you to risk your health for teh sake of social stigma. I don't know the rules but maybe you can work a little on the benefit but it still be there as a safety net and to stop you having to work lots of hours to the detriment of your health just to survive. If you're entitled to the time off because you're ill, which the professioanls think is true, go on the benefit and fuck the pressure. You have plenty of years ahead of you to contribute to taxes through full-time work.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You don't have to go on it if you think you're fine to work. The maximum you can earn per week is £20. (I think)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You can work 16 hours a week, depending on circumstances, and still claim IB, and agree with what Kat said.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    yeah, i know, i just feel like crying because i have nothing to prove to myself that i'm a "worthy" person...its all part of the depression and PTSD. I'm desperate to prove myself and feel good and i thought work would do that, but i'm likely to end up having more fits by trying to get things doen and getting stressed.

    oh this all feels like a visious circle...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Take the time off. It IS a step forward and in the right direction for your life lon tem. You need to take a break, take the break. Get yourself fit and then think about work, it's senisble, no shame in that, don't let pride hold you back in life. If you feel yopu're better after a while and the doc and social worker agree, there's nothing stopping you going back to work sooner than six months, just play it by ear.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yeah, I'd agree with Katralla on this one.

    The actual rules about work and hours and money etc are a bit complicated and depend on if you get incapacity benefit, youth incapacity benefit or income support due to incapacity or a combination thereof. Which you get depends on various things like what you've been doing in the last year or two, if you have been working and paying NI and how much, if you have been a full time student and at what level and other things. But don't fear, if you are medically too ill to work and can get the doctor to do the form for you to say this then you would get one of the benefits, they won't leave you to starve :)

    There is a good chance you could do some voluntry work though as this might help with your self-esteem.

    I've been taking time out since I finished university for health reasons, and that was a couple of years ago now, but I don't regret it as I know I need to get myself well in order to be able to function and get through life. I hope that maybe in time you too will be able to see that time not working doesn't have to be "wasted" time.

    Good luck with whatever route you decide :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It's also worth remembering that across the country, a significant proportion of the school/college leavers who have any kind of health problem would spend the summer enjoying the sunshine and not working because their parents support them.

    Hell, even those who are fighting fit are likely to be taking the summer as a holiday rather than working to support themselves.

    Looking back to when I had health problems a couple of years ago, it was the much harder to accept that I need time out to rest and recover and sort myself out than it was to keep going doing what I thought I should be (my degree or working).

    There are also other things to consider, like the kind of jobs you can reasonably do while you're having problems. There aren't many that have a working environment that would support a new employee/temp who fits for unknown reasons. It can also be very disheartening if you end up needing lots of time off because of health problems and again doesn't set you up for a great relationship with the employer.

    Like RG said, find out if you could do some voluntary work, tbh you'd make far more difference to society if you could find some voluntary stuff to do that used your musical talent than you would in some stop gap job. Again, there are many student types who do voluntary things over the summer and live off parents, or grants from their unis, use the benefit to fund yours.

    This post is trying to be friendly and helpful and encouraging, sorry if it sounds bossy/insulting, am failing with phrasing things !
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
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  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I was going to mention that; I believe that under the new fees system everyone gets the same bursaries and stuff (though means-tested and you could get a certain level of Disabled Student Allowance).

    I would say, try to do a few hours a week of voluntary service, but be sure to be absolutely honest with your supervisor if you do it. I coordinate shifts when I work at the shelter and would always rather someone was honest about their health and did less than wasn't honest and had problems.

    I don't imagine you would hold back, but don't be tempted to just so that people will allow you to work; if they say no it's because it's not safe for you.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    RubberSkin wrote: »
    You can work 16 hours a week, depending on circumstances, and still claim IB.

    Aye, personally I think working part time might be worth thinking about. Obviously it's up to you, just my 2p.

    If you could find a nice, easy job only working a few hours, maybe not every day, doing something that interests you if you can, you could get out of the house, meet people and earn a bit of cash. Good for your mental health, which will then probably carry across to physical probs, and it won't be such a shock to the system in the autumn when you go to uni.

    I know everyone's different, but if I didn't work at all, I think it'd make my health a lot worse (doc keeps trying to sign me off, but I'm not incapable, i just need to adapt).
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ok, so does anyone actually know if i can work on income support, which i'm getting now, part time without loosing any of it?

    i'm only going to work part time, i.e. 16 hours or under, but mainly because i have to rather than i want to. i do want something to do over the summer, but i've been given a voluntry project.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ok, so does anyone actually know if i can work on income support, which i'm getting now, part time without loosing any of it?

    i'm only going to work part time, i.e. 16 hours or under, but mainly because i have to rather than i want to. i do want something to do over the summer, but i've been given a voluntry project.

    I could be wrong, but once you earn a certain amount, your benefit goes down.
    I think it's nearer 80 as it's classed as theraputic work earnings.

    Isn't that only for a year or so?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,329 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ok, so does anyone actually know if i can work on income support, which i'm getting now, part time without loosing any of it?

    i'm only going to work part time, i.e. 16 hours or under, but mainly because i have to rather than i want to. i do want something to do over the summer, but i've been given a voluntry project.

    I *think* that with IS the rules are mostly to do with how much you can earn as well as hours. It's only about £10 - £20 per week and after that they take money off the IS, but it is £80 for the first year. I've got a good friend with ME who had to stop work and go on IS and then as she has gotten a bit better and is well enough to gradually work, she started on 1 day a week working and keep getting her IS and then as she improved health wise she gradually increased her hours and decreased her benefits, now she works 3 full days a week so doesn't get IS anymore.
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