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Innocent Man Has To Pay For Time In Jail

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  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Thats shit, there is no way he should have to pay rent for the time he was imprisoned. If his conviction was quashed (i.e. on the assumption he wasn't guilty after all)

    He should be fully compensated. If i was him I would sue the government for breaching his human rights, he can claim legal aid for that ;)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Does this mean if someoen gets imprisoned for something they've done, they have to pay as well?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sofie wrote: »
    Does this mean if someoen gets imprisoned for something they've done, they have to pay as well?

    No

    Well at the current rate of £1800 a day charged to the tax payer I think we should be quids in if we are making prisoners pay for their stay.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Calvin wrote: »
    Thats shit, there is no way he should have to pay rent for the time he was imprisoned. If his conviction was quashed (i.e. on the assumption he wasn't guilty after all)

    Its a petty admin thing - he'll be claiming for loss of earnings &c. against which a sum
    will be deducted from compensation to cover savings on rent and food
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    my dad told me a story about this guy once who was arrested (wrongly) who had to spend about a year in jail waiting for his trial to come up and when they decided he was innocent and let him go, obviously without any compensation or any apologies he descovered he was now homeless because as he had no family to pay his rent for him his landlord had let his flat to someone else and thrown out all his stuff so he was left with only the clothes on his back, no money because he had obviously lost his job and no where to stay....
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Big Gay wrote: »
    Its a petty admin thing - he'll be claiming for loss of earnings &c. against which a sum

    I don't follow :confused:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Calvin wrote: »
    I don't follow :confused:

    If he had been out then he would have incurred costs - such as rent and food. Both of these were "provided" by the state during his imprisonment

    He will claim for loss of earning etc, the state will reduce the claim for reduction in costs...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    If he had been out then he would have incurred costs - such as rent and food. Both of these were "provided" by the state during his imprisonment

    He will claim for loss of earning etc, the state will reduce the claim for reduction in costs...

    unnecessery costs on his part though, not as if he asked to be locked up
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    unnecessery costs on his part though, not as if he asked to be locked up

    How are they unneccesary, 3 years of food and accomodation for 7k - thats a good rate!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    unnecessery costs on his part though, not as if he asked to be locked up


    Irrelevant. If he is claiming for loss of income then he should also have his claim reduced for reduction of outgoings...

    Damages for false imprisonment are different.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    and how about compensation for the trauma, stress, lost time in his life?

    This is absurd, and symptomatic of a system that thinks monetary value can be placed in everything, or that it is the only meaningful source of value;
    "The purpose of the compensation is to put an individual back into the financial position they would have been in but for the miscarriage of justice, but not to a better position."

    These are inhuman comments; they show no compassion or concern for the mental health or emotional state of the person, much less the effect on his life of being imprisoned.

    I'm no legal scholar, but thats irrelevant to my point. There is an utter lack of humanity in the language being used.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Is it supposed to be based on loss of earnings? So a lawyer who was lock compensation than a cleaner?

    I don't see anything too bad about it based upon how it is worked out.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Financially thats certainly arguable, however I'm more concerned about the re-entry package (or lack thereof) that he receives; does he have access to any support services, or have his needs in this matter been adequately provided for.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I feel for the man. He hadn't committed any crime yet he has to pay his way. Apparently it's because it's the money he would have spent if he wasn't in prison in every day life and because he hasn't spent it he has to pay.

    It's not fair especially when murderers and rapists are eventually released and don't have to pay a penny but an innocent man does. It's absurd.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Reminds me of a quote from Max Weber; "The Iron Cage of Bureaucracy".
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    and how about compensation for the trauma, stress, lost time in his life?

    That would be where I mentioned that "damages" is different to loss of income.
    squeal wrote:
    It's not fair especially when murderers and rapists are eventually released and don't have to pay a penny but an innocent man does. It's absurd.

    But they don't get "loss of income" either, so you aren't comparing like with like there, are you?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    That would be where I mentioned that "damages" is different to loss of income.

    yes, but i was making this point in relation to the case as a whole rather than the specific legal examples you were explaining; which as i said, i know little about.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    But they don't get "loss of income" either, so you aren't comparing like with like there, are you?

    I think what Squeal is trying to say is that it's wrong that an innocent man has to pay for his housing and food for the time he spent in jail, yet a guilty man doesn't.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    No they don't. They have no freedom either, no income, no back-pay when they get out.

    That is the real difference here.

    Assume everyone earns £50k and serves three years. He will walk away with £150k less food/rent.

    They will walk away with fuck all.
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