Home Work & Volunteering
We've started our first discussion for our Christmas campaign which is focusing on religion or cultural beliefs that help you when you're feeling down. Some of the responses will be used anonymously on social media as a video. If you'd like to take part, head over to this thread.

Till discrepancies

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
I need some advice, I work in a bar and the other night thee was a problem with a till discrepancy. The till was £52 down which we were only told about the next day.

Our manager say that the money has to be paid back between the 4 of us that used the till. That works out at £13 each. Now I am really unhappy about this as its only a part time job and I only earn about £50 a week.

I am sure they are not allowed to do this and there is a law about the percentage they are allowed to deduct my wage for till discrepancies?

:mad:

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I wouldn't be happy about it and there is no way I would pay it unless I'd agreed to beforehand and it was in my contract. No one I know has ever been asked to pay money back because the til was wrong and no one has ever been given the extra money when the till has been over.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Is an employer entitled to make deductions from an employee’s pay

    ...
    In most cases, an employer can only lawfully make a deduction from an employee’s pay if the deduction is:-

    required to be made by law. For example, employers are required to deduct tax and national insurance from their employee’s pay by law; or

    allowed for by the employee’s contract. This means that there must be a specific clause in the contract which allows for that particular deduction to be made. The deduction can then only be made lawfully if the employee is given a written copy of that term in the contract before any deduction is made under it. This would cover deductions such as union dues or payments to a pension scheme; or

    the deduction has been agreed to in writing by the employee before it is deducted.

    There are particular additional rules for shop-workers which make it unlawful for an employer to deduct more than 10% from the gross wages of a shop-worker, if the deduction is for stock shortages or cash shortages.


    http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/index/life/employment/rights_to_pay.htm
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    My dads girlfriend used to help out at Childline. Different I know. But they can be a bother. Im sure they cant take more than 10% off you anyway. They need to investigate what happened to the money beforehand.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Jazza Bing
    My dads girlfriend used to help out at Childline. Different I know. But they can be a bother. Im sure they cant take more than 10% off you anyway. They need to investigate what happened to the money beforehand.
    Yep, so 10% would be £5.20 anyway.

    When I worked at M&S my till was always down, not because I was stealing it but because thick shits used to think it was beneath them to hand me the money and would put it on the conveyor belt thingy. When it moved it sucked the money underneath and the supervisers never made them pay again!!
Sign In or Register to comment.