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Iraq can't play the Muslim card.

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Jordan is joining Turkey in allowing allied planes etc to use if as a base.

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  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Re: Iraq can't play the Muslim card.
    Originally posted by pnjsurferpoet
    Jordan is joining Turkey in allowing allied planes etc to use if as a base.
    because they are shit fucking scared of not doing.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Re: Re: Iraq can't play the Muslim card.
    Originally posted by morrocan roll
    because they are shit fucking scared of not doing. whats the muslim card they can't play by the way?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Indeed, as if the ultimatum wasnt given by Bush, "give us rights to use the bases or you wont get any financial assistance or trade priveledges with us!".

    The only smoking gun at work here is the one Bush is holding to the head of Islamic leaders. The one's buckling are ones who's countries need economic help the most.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm o.k. with that.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Then you think Bush is right to demand unilateral war on anyone he chooses for any reason he can concoct without substantiated, documented proof to back his continual allegations and to force other nations to assist through economic blackmail? Well my young friend, you susbscribe to the very dirty politics that have landed us in this mess in the first place then.

    More's the pity. One day, youll find yourself very ashamed of the position you so readily agree with now, if you have any sense that is.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Actually I think that PNJ was okay with the assertion that Bush has told Turkey/Jordan that they would get no support from the US when they [Jordan/Turkey] wanted it, if they couldn't offer a reciprocal agreement.

    Surely that's diplomacy, you give something, you get something in return...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    In principle yes MoK thats true. However paying for the right to wreak even greater havoc on an unstable region on the doorstep of these countries is more a case of economic blackmail than diplomacy.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I guess that depends of whether or not those countries would happily see the back of their neighbour too...

    They may not agree with the grounds for attacks now, but I don't think either country sees Saddam as a friend.

    It would certainly buy them out of a political hole, allow them to give their bases up without the political stigma of openly supporting Bush's campaign. For those two countries it's pretty much an almost perfect political solution...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I know a number of people in Jordan and Saddam is no friend to them. However practically everyone is against a war there (working on the proof Greenhat, will post it as soon as I have it :D ) and there are fears of riots and uprising when the war kicks off. Non-essential staff from the US and British embassies have already left because of security fears.

    And what prompts this anger from a people who actually don't like Saddam? The feeling that the Muslim world is being persecuted and that the very people who are coming to 'liberate' the Iraqis and rid the world of a dangerous man are actively supporting another oppressive regime half hour drive from Amman also in breach of countless UN resolutions and in possession of WMDs.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    With whom they have attempted to fight several aggressive actions and got their ass kicked every time...

    But I get what you are saying, and you know I don't supoprt Israel or their continual occupation and resettlement of the territories.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yeah I know you don't. What I'm saying is that regardless of past wars and conflicts in the area (most of which were started by Arab countries not Israel) the feeling now is, as it has been for the last few years, that is it time to sort out the Palestinian situation once and for all. The Arab countries have put forward 2 peace plans in the last 12 months and are actively seeking a solution, and what they would like to see is the US getting actively involved and employing the same kind of pressure is applying on Iraq to get the situation solved once and for all. Most of the said countries think (and I share that view) that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is a much more urgent issue than Iraq.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Be a good idea to tell Arafat too then. He was the one who fucked up last time, and you can bet your arse that he would again. Oh, and the last one did have significant US input. DIdn't stop the Palestine rep from poo-pooing it.

    Would also help to make sure that the Arab solution has the support of the other terrorist organisation as well. It would be foolish to expect Israel to accept anything which didn't give them confidence that the terrorism they face would practically cease.

    What Israel needs is a sense of faith in their security. What the Palestinian need is their own land. Neither will happen without the other.

    We also shouldn't link Iraq and Palestine, they are separate issues, Saddam only uses the Palestinian cause because he knows it will give him support in the Muslim world. We should never give credence to that.
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