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What can the government do to reduce mental health problems?

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Jeremy Corbin raised the issue of funding for mental health services during his first PMQs. Nick Clegg raised the same issue at a Liberal Democrats conference a few months ago. It seems that when ever politicians raise the issue of mental health, the debate is about how much money should be spent.

Demand for help with mental health problems is rising among young people. I'd like to know what you think the government and society can do to change this, so fewer young people will have mental health problems in the future. If you have mental health problems, could anything have been done by the government or the people in your life that would have reduced the impact of your mental health problem on your life, or even prevented it completely?

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    There will never be enough support for young people with mental health problems regardless of how much money the government have, because to “overcome” whats happening, You need to be able to feel, Happier again Safe, Calm, not anxious…Which is practically impossible, Yes Medication can help, Yes counselling and therapy can help, and yes so can Hospitalisation (Sometimes) Help, but In my opinion they do a great job of “pretending the problem” isn’t there, I don’t think there is anything..any amount of money the government can do that will help “A bullied child, to feel less worthless again” “A person who went through years of sexual abuse to feel safe being around people” “Someone who’s lost both his parents, to stop feeling helpless” The only way mental health will improve for young people in the future, is if they stopped having factors for that mental health condition to happen in the first place. Bullying, abuse. Ect.

    Which I know is ridiculous right, You can’t say “heres 20 grand, Now no child will be bullied again”. I do think they needs to be more mental health professionals, or services though for those who start showing early signs of mental health problems, To feel “supported” and not get to crisis points. Teachers need to be more aware of what struggles young people are facing these days. I’d like to see personally a barrier put up at the Humber bridge, like there is at Clifton bridge in Bristol, there is practically a daily accurance of someone jumping off the Humber bridge. It’s devastating for the community.

    I’m sorry if this isn’t what you was expecting, But I think more focus should be on “Why are our young people depressed how do we stop them getting to that stage”
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I agree with Redhead. Another problem is the lack of education in school.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Redhead wrote: »
    There will never be enough support for young people with mental health problems regardless of how much money the government have, because to “overcome” whats happening, You need to be able to feel, Happier again Safe, Calm, not anxious…Which is practically impossible, Yes Medication can help, Yes counselling and therapy can help, and yes so can Hospitalisation (Sometimes) Help, but In my opinion they do a great job of “pretending the problem” isn’t there, I don’t think there is anything..any amount of money the government can do that will help “A bullied child, to feel less worthless again” “A person who went through years of sexual abuse to feel safe being around people” “Someone who’s lost both his parents, to stop feeling helpless” The only way mental health will improve for young people in the future, is if they stopped having factors for that mental health condition to happen in the first place. Bullying, abuse. Ect.

    Which I know is ridiculous right, You can’t say “heres 20 grand, Now no child will be bullied again”. I do think they needs to be more mental health professionals, or services though for those who start showing early signs of mental health problems, To feel “supported” and not get to crisis points. Teachers need to be more aware of what struggles young people are facing these days. I’d like to see personally a barrier put up at the Humber bridge, like there is at Clifton bridge in Bristol, there is practically a daily accurance of someone jumping off the Humber bridge. It’s devastating for the community.

    I’m sorry if this isn’t what you was expecting, But I think more focus should be on “Why are our young people depressed how do we stop them getting to that stage”

    That is a very good point, and gets to the heart of the problem, which is what this thread is all about.

    It sounds like what you're saying is that yes there needs to be more support for people who develop mental illnesses, but more also needs to be done to address the issues that for many people, are causing them to have mental health problems, like bullying and child abuse.

    But why do you think there is a pretence that the problem isn't there? Do you think politicians and society find it hard to address issues like the ones you havve highlighted, or could the problem be one of people being reluctant to face up to the impact of the sufffering many people who have mental health problems have experienced.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Melian wrote: »
    I agree with Redhead. Another problem is the lack of education in school.

    What were you taught at school about mental health, and in what year of your schooling? What would you want children or teenagers to be taught?

    Education could improve understanding of mental health conditions, but could it also encourage more people to think of the potential impact of their actions on the mental health of others?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    WayneS wrote: »

    What were you taught at school about mental health, and in what year of your schooling? What would you want children or teenagers to be taught?

    Education could improve understanding of mental health conditions, but could it also encourage more people to think of the potential impact of their actions on the mental health of others?

    We were taught nothing.
  • plugitinplugitin Noob Posts: 2,197 The Mix Regular
    We were taught absolutely nothing and there was no statutory referrals process either - so they could 'strongly suggest' I sought help, but there was no way of enforcing this.

    Nothing was mentioned in PSHE, and we didn't even cover it in Sociology.

    I think talking about it is important because it's the people who bottle it up that you need to worry about. Having that forum and letting students know it's okay to talk about it would be a big step, imo.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    plugitin wrote: »
    I think talking about it is important because it's the people who bottle it up that you need to worry about. Having that forum and letting students know it's okay to talk about it would be a big step, imo.

    But wouldn't people be reluctant to share their experiences in a lesson, in case they got bullied? How would a school minimise the chances of people being bullied because of their mental health, so they could speak openly about it without having to worry that other people would use their openness against them?
  • plugitinplugitin Noob Posts: 2,197 The Mix Regular
    WayneS wrote: »

    But wouldn't people be reluctant to share their experiences in a lesson, in case they got bullied? How would a school minimise the chances of people being bullied because of their mental health, so they could speak openly about it without having to worry that other people would use their openness against them?

    Oops sorry, I didn't make it clear. I wasn't meaning people talking about their problems - but rather the teacher educating that such problems can exist, how they can manifest and what to do if you think you may have an issue! (And that it's fine to talk about it too)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Given how common MH are in teenagers, I'm surprised (this appeared to be the case when I was at school anyway) there's no policy on what the school should do if someone tells them they're having issues.
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