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Juice, sweeties, and local language

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
So, I've moved to the other end of the country to where I used to be and am also working offshore.

Today the whole platform got 'Juice and sweeties'.

Now, being a southern pansy, I thought this would have meant fruit juice and gummy sweet type things.

We actually got a can of fizzy drink and a chocolate bar.

Turns out:

Juice = fizzy drinks
Sweeties = chocolate

Anyone else got regional/local terms for stuff?

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    cob = bread roll
    nesh = always cold
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ta = thank you

    Didn't realise this was a Plymouth thing until I was asked "what does "ta" mean?"
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Melian wrote: »
    Ta = thank you

    Didn't realise this was a Plymouth thing until I was asked "what does "ta" mean?"

    I think 'ta' is something said from all over, it is here in Essex anyway
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Lexi99 wrote: »
    I think 'ta' is something said from all over, it is here in Essex anyway

    I've never heard anyone from other cities say it.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Melian wrote: »
    I've never heard anyone from other cities say it.

    ta is said pretty much everywhere i think.

    i remember having to explain what nowt and owt meant to my australian friend. nothing and anything just in case people didnt know.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Melian wrote: »
    I've never heard anyone from other cities say it.

    We say it int north.

    Ayup=hello
    Twitchel=alleyway
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Melian wrote: »
    I've never heard anyone from other cities say it.

    I say it all the bloody time :o
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Wee = small
    Aye = yes

    Both fairly common scots I think.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    We say ta here in yorkshire too.
    I get told off a lot for not pronouncing five and nine properly, In my accent it's pronounced faaaave and naaaane :d
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    hmmm7 wrote: »
    We say ta here in yorkshire too.
    I get told off a lot for not pronouncing five and nine properly, In my accent it's pronounced faaaave and naaaane :d

    Yeah, I get told its fourteen not forteen.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I could go on all day-

    Baw - ball
    Bawbag - testicle :o
    Coupon - face
    Bunnet - hat
    Pished - drunk
    Auld - old
    Jammy - lucky
    Stoatin' - varies with context. For example, the rain came stoatin' doon, I was just stoatin' around
    Jakie - alcoholic/druggie/nutter
    Rocket - nutter
    Bam/Bampot - nutter
    Radge - nutter

    The Scots are to nutters as Eskimos are to snow :o
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Tbh though most of these in this thread i recognie what they mean if i dont use them myself: ayup, aye etc etc

    Then of course youve got the cockney rhyming slang that me n my family sometimes use such as 'boatrace' or 'oxford' for 'face'
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I say it all the bloody time :o
    So do I. I've heard people from all over the UK say it.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I thought I knew words until I moved to Barnsley.

    Spadger? Chelping? Lakin'? Coit? Fettle? Mitherin'. (that's penis/term of endearment; talking, esp. answering back; playing; coat; clean; bothering). No, me neither.

    Not to mention the use of words you recognise in totally different formats, like 'spice' for sweets, or 'roaring' for crying. I've lived here four years now, and I still wouldn't say I'm fluent. I speak reasonable conversational Barnsley ;)

    In Leeds the only thing that used to confuse people from elsewhere was 'ginnel' (alleyway).

    And I thought 'ta' was a northern thing? I've definitely heard it used most often in Yorkshire/Lancashire and the surroundings!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ginnel is used here, my yorkshire friends say snicket.
    I hear the word coit used here, mainly by older people, like my dad who will also say stuff like 'up there int thills'.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I still maintain, juice has something to do with fruit, not cans of drink.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I still maintain, juice has something to do with fruit, not cans of drink.

    I agree. If someone says juice, I assume they mean a drink made with fruit.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ginnel is used here, my yorkshire friends say snicket.

    I'd use both. To me, a ginnel has high fenced sides, while a snicket is open or has lower sides!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    West country specific:

    Gertlush - great
    luvver - affectionate term for pretty much everyone...

    Norfolk specific:

    Bishy-barney-bee - Ladybird

    Does anyone know what goldering and laughing means (its a norfolk thing)? Its something my great cousin used to say a lot.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ginnel's not a Yorkshire word- the Yorkshire word is snicket. Ginnel's a County Durham word, as is vennel.

    If you think juice is confusing, what about teacake? A teacake is a white bread bun, although Southern pansies erroneously think that a teacake has fruit in it.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kaff wrote: »
    And I thought 'ta' was a northern thing? I've definitely heard it used most often in Yorkshire/Lancashire and the surroundings!

    I thought it was a northern thing, too, I got it from my Yorkshire/Cheshire family.

    Mardy tends to confuse my more southern friends. Means something similar to moody / antsy.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Do teacakes not have the occasional raisin in them?

    And what's a muffin?

    And what does a scone look like?

    And what on earth is a buttery?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    And what's a muffin?

    There's two - the cake type thing and the thing you have for breakfast that you toast. (I know - it's crap description!)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yup.

    The cafe price list at work usefully has both listed as muffin, with completely different prices.

    Which numpty gave two similar products the same name, now really.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    And what on earth is a buttery?

    The only butteries I've come across have been posh Oxford canteens
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    'Ta' is what you teach really young children to say in place of 'thank you' right?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    This buttery is definitely not a canteen, it's food.

    Ta used to make me think North, it now makes me think of Gap Yah.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    skakitty wrote: »
    'Ta' is what you teach really young children to say in place of 'thank you' right?

    Yes
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