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Operation in knee...

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Basically it's like this:

Had a knee accident in march during skiing (note: this was not my fault, but entirely my friends). After a tour of doctors and other people who were supposed to know what was wrong, i got to a specialist who said that the wrapper (that's what my dictionary says it's called. But in case it's not true it's the cross thing which keeps the knee cap in place or so) was probably ripped. He can't be sure of this, unless they will make a "telescope testing" (it has a latin name, which I can't remember by any means. But they basically make two holes, and stick to two telescopes in, to see exactly what is wrong). And in order to finally fix the knee, he has to do this.

I was wondering if anyone here had tried it. How long it took to heal (I have my prom a week after the testing)? And how long it took to walk properly again (I HATE crutches :mad: )?

Thanks :)

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Have they used MRI scans on your knee?

    I'd be a bit sceptical about explorative surgery if they haven't even used MRI scans, most injuries can be very well diagnosed using this method and it doesn't cause any damage.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    And was it a MCL or ACL tear?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I am afraid that I am not sure what MRI scannings are.
    I just know that regular scannings don't work, and that they need a telescope in the knee to get a real idea abpout what it's all about.
    If it really turns out to be a ripped or damaged wrapper (he is quite sure, as he said, he can't imagine my kneecap being able to move so much and in such a swollen state, without any injury), then I'll need a proper operation.

    Editted to add: I really don't know any of those expressions, lol
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Jacqueline the Ripper
    I am afraid that I am not sure what MRI scannings are.
    I just know that regular scannings don't work, and that they need a telescope in the knee to get a real idea abpout what it's all about.
    X rays would be useless, but a proper MRI scan should illustrate the damge quite well. They are huge rings, with very strong magnets inside them, and you slide into the centre of them, and they rotate round the body, drawing a 3D image of the tissue. They are very sensitive, and are often used to look at torn ligaments.
    They often look like this:
    mri%202.jpg
    MRI.jpg
    mri.gif
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Just remember teh doctors will know exactly what they are talking about, try to talk to one of them about any worries they will all be eager to help advise you.

    Goodluck
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    That 'wrapping' across your knee, is a tendon. It holds muscles onto your bone so you can move your bones.

    What the doc thinks is that, in your skiing accident you twisted your leg and ripped one of your tendons. I think they take a long time to heel...its like i you tear your Achilles tendon (in your ankle) you're screwed for life, and you won't ever run as fast. I'm not sure what they'll do tho, soz.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    you really should just talk to your doctor and explain your worries.
    injuries to the knee can take a long time to heal. my sister twisted her knee during ski-ing and she tore her cruciel (sp) ligament (a common injury in footballers). she couldnt have an operation but had to have physio for 3 years and her knee still bothers her.
    i fell recently and tore ligaments in my knee although it wasnt quite as serious, i havent had any physio because i dont really need it as much as she did, but my knee still bothers me. i was trying to take up running as a means of getting fit before i hurt my knee and i have had to do other things such as cycling and swiming because i just cant run on it. be careful with your knees because if you arent careful they can end up wrecked permanently. i really think you should get the test done because it will be worth finding out what is wrong with it and getting it put right.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Alistair, I havn't seen nor heard of these machines before.

    The doctor I saw is a specialist. Unfortunately, my English doesn't contain medicinal expressions. Therefore I have to look those up in the dictionary, and I can't be sure if what it says is correct.

    The doctor told me, that my knee will never be "perfect" again. He said that once you have a serious knee injury it's never going to go back to how it was. So basically as he told me "you don't notice your right knee. It's just there. But you will always be able to feel the left one, as you do now. And you need to be slighlty conciderate with it".

    At the moment I am on crutches (will probably be until some weeks after the operation :( ), due to heavy swellings, so I can't really join any sport activities. But before I wasn't allowed to join sports classes, swimming (I like breaststroke best, and I am only allowed crawl), running, ballgames and any kind of activity where I risk to move my knee is such a way that it doesn't turn the same way a smy nose.

    A rule I had to follow was, always keep your knee in the same direction as your nose.

    After the operation, I will have physiotherapy for a looooooong time (I actually started that 4 months ago), and the knee will get better but not perfect.

    I was just wondering, how other people experienced it?
    This is certainly not something I am looking forward to, and I want to know what other people went through, and what to expect (I know that everyone is different in healing and all, but it's still good to know)?

    Thanks for the replies guys :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The procedure you are talking about is an Arthroscopy or in simpler terms Key Hole Surgery.

    I have chronic knee problems but my Orthopedic Surgeon said that doing an Arthroscopy would achieve nothing for me, because they already know what it is and it cannot be permantley fixed.

    However, I also have a physiotheripst for a father and have been able to obtain this website for you to view: www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au. Do a search for "knees" and it will list a whole lot of articles, including a detailed description of what an Arthroscopy entails. From what you have described it sounds like you have the following problem (copied from the above website)

    "The knee joint is bolstered on both sides by additional strips of cartilage, called 'menisci' or semilunar cartilages. One of the most common knee injuries is a torn or split meniscus. Severe impact or twisting, especially during weight bearing exercise, can tear this cartilage. Tears of the meniscus can also occur in older people due to wear and tear. Symptoms include swelling, pain and the inability to straighten the leg. The damaged cartilage can be surgically trimmed or even removed without causing any joint instability"

    Sorry, I couldn't give you a personal account but I did find that this website explained things in everyday language. You should also ask your specialist all the questions you can, it is better to be fully aware of the procedure and the outcome, then know too little. You can even ask your physio if you dont' feel like you are getting what you need from the specialist.

    Lastly, the only reason I can think of as to why they would be doing the Arthroscopy straight away instead of a MRI is because if they have a look in there and it confirms what they already think, they can fix it whilst they are there - but I am not an expert and different doctors have different ways of approching things.
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