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Tell me how terrible it is to have a doggie woggie woo

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
I'm getting really broody for a doggie. Please someone put me off! Its expensive and a big tie but also would get me out the house every day. I'm hoping my landlord says no as that would stop me. I've spent an hour today researching pet insurance and looking at gumtree and rescue centres for dogs. Just a little doggie. Like a king charles spanial or a terrier cross breed or something.

Would Randomcat mind?

Comments

  • ReenaReena Fanatical Poster Posts: 1,375 The Mix Regular
    Can't really help you there I love my doggie.
    But she does get stinking, always makes a mess down her kennel, I have to pick up her mess when she goes where she isn't allowed. She cost me hundreds of pounds in food and vet bills, she digs her claws in when she wants fuss and use to bark at strange dogs all the time. That was scary.
    But I love her too much, even if she drives me crazy. I only wish I was a better owner for her. xx
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    but cats are betterrrrrrr
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    but cats are betterrrrrrr

    I've already got a cat. And he doesn't help me leave the house when I'm feeling bad.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I want a dog but pets aren't allowed where I live. Settled for sea monkeys, but they aren't great company
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'll give you my parents dog for a while. He looks cute and innocent but he opens all the cabinets (even with child safety locks on them) pulls out all the food and either eats it or throws it all over the living room (especially if it is easy to clean up like flour and sugar).

    He also likes books, toilet paper, cd's poop, dead mice, chapstick, knitting projects and pretty much anything else he can get a hold of :p

    Or perhaps the in-law dog who costs a fortune because she has diabates and about a million other ailments. She is a little lemon :(
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Dogs are a big responsibility - if you get a pup/young dog you could be looking up to a 15 year commitment....sometimes more. Also some breeds need a lot of exercise (labs, spaniels, any kind of working dog), looking at 3 walks a day minimum. If it's just you it can be hard as you find you can't stay out late/over night without planning ahead for someone to come feed/walk it. Which is fine if you have a family/friends who don't mind but if not you have to fork out for a dog sitter. Not to mention all the training, food, vet bills, possible whining/barking at all hours. It's basically like having a child. I've volunteered in shelters and all too often dogs come in because people move/have a child/separate/get too old/the dog gets too old and loads of other reasons. So you also need to think ahead, a dog might suit your lifestyle now and seem like a great idea but things can change and you need to think if you can adapt to that with the dog. It's so easy to get sucked in by the idea of a cute puppy, but they require a lot of work, so much money and eventually they will get old and will be even more work.
    Basically - think very hard about getting a dog before you do it!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    my name wrote: »
    I'll give you my parents dog for a while. He looks cute and innocent but he opens all the cabinets (even with child safety locks on them) pulls out all the food and either eats it or throws it all over the living room (especially if it is easy to clean up like flour and sugar).

    He also likes books, toilet paper, cd's poop, dead mice, chapstick, knitting projects and pretty much anything else he can get a hold of :p

    Or perhaps the in-law dog who costs a fortune because she has diabates and about a million other ailments. She is a little lemon :(

    Thanks that's the type of putting off I need. I'm a tidy freak so would hate something that messed my flat up.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ballerina wrote: »
    Dogs are a big responsibility - if you get a pup/young dog you could be looking up to a 15 year commitment....sometimes more. Also some breeds need a lot of exercise (labs, spaniels, any kind of working dog), looking at 3 walks a day minimum. If it's just you it can be hard as you find you can't stay out late/over night without planning ahead for someone to come feed/walk it. Which is fine if you have a family/friends who don't mind but if not you have to fork out for a dog sitter. Not to mention all the training, food, vet bills, possible whining/barking at all hours. It's basically like having a child. I've volunteered in shelters and all too often dogs come in because people move/have a child/separate/get too old/the dog gets too old and loads of other reasons. So you also need to think ahead, a dog might suit your lifestyle now and seem like a great idea but things can change and you need to think if you can adapt to that with the dog. It's so easy to get sucked in by the idea of a cute puppy, but they require a lot of work, so much money and eventually they will get old and will be even more work.
    Basically - think very hard about getting a dog before you do it!

    Yes this is the type of realistic advice I needed! I think I've been put off for now at least although I'm still a bit keen, although I don't like going outside so don't know if having a dog would help with this or make me stress about it. If I got a dog I'd probably get an old doddery one so I could keep up with it and it wouldn't live til I'm 50. Really I just want to find a friend who has a dog who will let me do the fun stuff with it sometimes and they take the responsibility.
  • SkiveSkive No discipline. No morality. No respect. New ForestPosts: 15,189 Skive's The Limit
    Wouldn't get a King Charles Spaniel. Very unhealthy breed due to interbreeding. That's also why I wouldn't get a Bull Dog, Boxer or a Pug either.
    Ballerina wrote: »
    Also some breeds need a lot of exercise (labs, spaniels, any kind of working dog), looking at 3 walks a day minimum.

    That's a bit excessive. An hour a day + a bit more for energetic dogs.
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  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Could you maybe volunteer as a dog walker?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Skive wrote: »
    Wouldn't get a King Charles Spaniel. Very unhealthy breed due to interbreeding. That's also why I wouldn't get a Bull Dog, Boxer or a Pug either.



    That's a bit excessive. An hour a day + a bit more for energetic dogs.

    I meant they need to go out at least 3 times a day. Mine usually get 4 short walks a day as one is 12 and can't cope with lots of long walks. Then they get a big 2 hour walk through the woods every few weeks depending on the weather. It really does depend on the dog. I've always thought walks as combined toilet breaks and exercise, we don't let our dogs out to poop/wee in the garden as they do all that when they go on a walk and they know that walks are time for that. Obviously you sometimes have to let them out for the odd accident but I think it's a good way of getting into a routine of walking them and helps prevent you from getting lazy and just letting them out into the garden. It varies between dogs but they are a lot more chilled out and easier to handle when they get walks so it never hurts to do a bit more than the minimum
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Could you maybe volunteer as a dog walker?

    Just been looking into this. I can't see any charities that do it locally but there are bound to be random old people who need help with their doggies. I should have a think about this. Thing is I'm not very confident so this could cause an issue.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Randomgirl wrote: »
    Just been looking into this. I can't see any charities that do it locally but there are bound to be random old people who need help with their doggies. I should have a think about this. Thing is I'm not very confident so this could cause an issue.
    It could help though? Is there a dogs trust nearby? They always want helpers to feed and walk. Maybe even donate some old blankets/towels to start with?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Theres nothing very near by and I don't travel very well. But there is a community centre where I knit about 5 minutes away who run elderly groups, I might ask if anyone there needs some extra help with their dog.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Randomgirl wrote: »
    Theres nothing very near by and I don't travel very well. But there is a community centre where I knit about 5 minutes away who run elderly groups, I might ask if anyone there needs some extra help with their dog.

    That's a good way to start. I bet both dog and owner would appreciate some company
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I love my boys but they are fluffy and get poo stuck in their butt fur -_-

    It needs cutting out more often than you would think xD

    GROSS
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