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That's Gay: No Homo

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Got I hate rappers... I really hate this phrase doesnt catch on
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I hear this daily, have for quite a while. CS;S has quite the no homos.

    PS: The guy in the video is irriting I never finished watching it :l
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    What, I don't get it?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ShyBoy wrote: »
    What, I don't get it?

    Apparently, "no homo" is a phrase you say to reassure others your actions or things you say don't make them think you are homosexual. It's so ridiculously homophobe and stupid that it already found it's way into pop music.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I wouldn't say it is offensive, it's like when guys say "It's not gay if balls don't touch", just a joke. It is in bad taste with the songs though, stupid lyrics. But isn't 99% of rap music?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    geneve wrote: »
    I don't think it's homophobic, it's just masculine to need to point it out.

    Yeah a lot of gay guys need to constantly convince themselves they're not gay. If they're in denial that is.

    Seriously, how many different versions of "gay" have to be adopted as an insult before people will get it into their heads that there's more to it than just another version of "wuss," "wimp" or "big jessy?" It may be used in that way by the majority of people who say it, but the very fact that being gay is associated with these things is the problem in the first place. Imagine if someone used a phrase that was used to describe black people whenever they wanted to describe someone who was stupid. The fact that they weren't using it specifically to insult a black person doesn't mean the phrase wouldn't be steeped in racism.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    So, what are you saying, that one example of Miss Jay as effeminate male cancels out all the masculine, even hypermasculine, representations of gay men as rugby players?

    Or that people are all different, regardless of gender and sexual orientation and yet some stereotypes prevail over other characteristics, stereotypes that are from a heteronormative perspective, demonstrating where there is power in society?

    Or perhaps you see Miss Jay as a celebration of the ability to not conform to heteronormative proscriptive ideals, and yet still be happy, successful and admired?

    Thought not... You really are dull!

    I can't see how the phrase 'no homo' isn't steeped with prejudice. I don't think it's fair to say that rap music is some ultimate site of prejudice and stupidity though. Yes, there are examples, and probably very prominant ones but rap music also has a history of empowerment through knowledge and collective consciousness.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I don't think you really know what you are saying.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    To be honest, I don't think Miss Jay comes off as a wuss AT ALL. I think s/he (I never know omg) would be able to hold his/her (god this is hard work) own when it came to a fight.

    :heart: Miss Jay.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Whilst I'm mildly amused at people sufficiently insecure in their sexuality to feel need to state their heterosexuality, it's an indication of the low esteem with which they hold homosexuality.

    Far more worrying are the examples where it is used in conjunction with descriptions of sex acts between men - underlining that they consider forcing others to participate in sex acts as being acceptable, and by extension of the drive to use sex as a form of humiliation it suggests a level of misogyny.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm not even gay but I find it a bit offensive. I make the 'balls dont touch' joke with my friends but thats more of a meme from the internet. Like "hey I'm going to make sweet love to you but its ok its not gay as long as balls dont touch". But that's just the same as asking someone if they like mudkips because it's an in joke that lots of people get. In that context it's more like a pisstake of oneself either pretending to be grossly ignorant or pretending to be grossly in denial about your 'real' sexuality. "It's cool man, I'm not gay, I just like having sex with men." It's ironic, or sarcastic, or something like that!

    The no homo thing maybe I misinterpreted but it sounded like the rappers etc were taking it more serious rather than a pisstake of insecurity or whatever.

    I think its seen as quite a macho thing as Big Gay alludes to - to 'rape' or degrade other men by suggesting they perform in sex acts, and I can definitely see the elements of misogynism (e.g. I am reducing you to the level of a woman - service my sexual needs then fuck off). It's about power ultimately, I am a 'big man' with the power to use you as my fuck toy if I so wish.

    When I saw the video on it I was actually appalled and offended myself but maybe I'm being too middle class or taking it from a biased source or whatever.

    I thought largely we were past all this kind of stuff. American rappers seem to not be at a level of 'social evolution' the rest of us are perhaps, still stuck 150 years ago.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I hate the fact that, in rap that young children sing, there are homophobic lyrics etc. Take eminem, he is a great rapper... but his lyrics are just...

    I got teased for being bi, and some girl goes "What you like fucking girls?" and I went "No love, I'm just a greedy bitch." She took me seriously, and goes "Few, I thought you were a lesbo."

    Oh and, I couldn't watch the whole video.
    Xx
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ShyBoy wrote: »
    I thought largely we were past all this kind of stuff. American rappers seem to not be at a level of 'social evolution' the rest of us are perhaps, still stuck 150 years ago.

    To be fair there's a lot of progressive, political charged and challenging rap and hip-hop that comes out of America, sadly it's just not what gets mass marketed over here as 'rap'. Which is perhaps the saddest thing, it's deliberately playing to a prejudice in order to reinforce it and generate sales much as the East Coast/West Coast rivalry was a useful sales hook that spiraled out of control.

    Of course in the case of homophobia it's not going to be the BIGs or Tupaks that end up paying for it - it's some poor kid beaten up or killed by someone who had their bigotry reinforced and, to them, justified by the music they admired or enjoyed.

    And since they don't get anywhere near enough publicity here's a page of links to some of rappers and movements from the gay hip-hop scene.

    http://www.io.com/~larrybob/hiphop.html
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Big Gay wrote: »
    Far more worrying are the examples where it is used in conjunction with descriptions of sex acts between men - underlining that they consider forcing others to participate in sex acts as being acceptable, and by extension of the drive to use sex as a form of humiliation it suggests a level of misogyny.

    Interesting to note which culture rap music, or at least elements of the most mainstream and homophobic parts of rap music, bases it's fabricated social norms on - American prison culture. Even though, of course, the closest most successful rappers, and especially their producers behind the music, got to that culture was watching Oz in drama school.

    It's not surprising to see the abusive and predator focused viewpoints of the most abusive prison inmates reinforced through the least progressive elements of gangsta rap.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    There's also feminist rap out there too, you just don't have to listen to crap.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    katralla wrote: »
    I can't see how the phrase 'no homo' isn't steeped with prejudice. I don't think it's fair to say that rap music is some ultimate site of prejudice and stupidity though. Yes, there are examples, and probably very prominant ones but rap music also has a history of empowerment through knowledge and collective consciousness.
    That.

    Although I do think that in its recent history, sadly, rap culture has been associated with some pretty serious homophobia.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    piccolo wrote: »
    That.

    Although I do think that in its recent history, sadly, rap culture has been associated with some pretty serious homophobia.
    I have found some reggae, dancehall and ragga to be misogynistic and homophobic.

    My flatmate used to listen to a song called "she's a hoe" or something similar.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    it's a stupid catch-phrase that's in vogue with high school aged people. It'll be forgotten in a few months. I don't really see "no homo" entering the English lexicon.
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