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Id?

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
I'm having an 18th birthday party and they said they will be ID'ing on the bar, as well as only allowing one drink per person at a time. Most of my friends are 18 or over but what about the ones that aren't? Is this unfair on them?

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    erm no... it's tough on them as it is illegal.

    we've all been there. where half the group can drink and half can't. Just have a house party or hire a hall and give people alcohol (ie don't make them pay with money- it's illegal to that even in a hired venue as far as i know) but noting stops you giving them drinks. Problem solved. Thats what a friend of mine did for her 16th.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Its not unfair, its the law, and everyone has to follow it. They've got the rest of their lives to drink, theyre not missing anything but waiting a couple of years
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I agree. What your friends might not know or care about is that if they get served and the person serving them gets reported/caught they're the ones who get fined and lose their job. If it's a public bar they have a huge amount to lose if they get caught serving underage drinkers, I believe the fine from the police/council licensing department can be in the region of several thousand pounds and suspension/revocation of their licence.

    If your underage friends want to be able to drink legally then you need to hire out a private function room that doesn't have access to the general public (ie uninvited guests) and you can't charge for the drink.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yes, it is slightly unfair of the landlord to restrict people to only buying one drink at a time, however, if one of your friends over 18 were to buy an alcoholic drink for one of your friends under 18, they would be committing an offence (unless it was with a meal), and the landlord is taking reasonable steps to prevent this occurring on his premises.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    If anyone overaged is driving, they could buy an alcoholic drink, while an underaged buys a soft drink, then they can swap drinks when they get back to their seats. Now here's an idea :-)
  • Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Warming up? Posts: 16,688
    Off topic:
    That's where laws begin to make no sense IMO.
    Is it really so much different if someone is 17 years and 11 months old, than 18?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    no not really, but if you allowed 17 and 11 month olds to drink, why then should you not allow 17 and 10 month olds to drink? And technically it is just buying in pubs and shops. you can have as many house parties etc with alcohol as you please if you are under 18!
  • Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Warming up? Posts: 16,688
    no not really, but if you allowed 17 and 11 month olds to drink, why then should you not allow 17 and 10 month olds to drink? And technically it is just buying in pubs and shops. you can have as many house parties etc with alcohol as you please if you are under 18!
    I wasn't saying it could make sense, just that it doesn't.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yeah, I'm just worried some of my friends will think I've done it on purpose just to rub it in their face that I'll be legal and they won't.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    To get around it maybe have a house party but do be careful as some have got out of hand.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Off topic:
    That's where laws begin to make no sense IMO.
    Is it really so much different if someone is 17 years and 11 months old, than 18?

    Seeing as 18 year olds can't handle their beer anyway, youre probably right. Doesn't make much difference :lol:


    Seriously though, there has to be a cut off somewhere and it's been 18 for decades.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    lyric wrote: »
    Yeah, I'm just worried some of my friends will think I've done it on purpose just to rub it in their face that I'll be legal and they won't.

    If your friends think that then they're idiots. Its illegal to sell booze to under 18s and pub owners can get in a shitload of trouble from the courts if they get found out. Most places wouldn't risk it. If you think they're gonna be a problem and you give a shit, then cancel the party. Simple. You cant throw a party in a pub for an 18th, and expect them not to id people.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You're right. I'll just have to tell my underage friends to borrow this older siblings' ID or just get someone else to buy their drinks.
  • **helen****helen** Mod malarkist Posts: 9,235 Listening Ear
    lyric wrote: »
    You're right. I'll just have to tell my underage friends to borrow this older siblings' ID or just get someone else to buy their drinks.

    Obviously this option does come with potential negative consequences...

    Ideally you wouldn't suggest this to your friends and just let them make their own decisions. You could always go to the pub with the people who are of age and then arrange a separate party for those who aren't.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm not allowed a house party. It'll be fine. I've been served hundreds of times and I've been to hundreds of pubs and clubs since I was sixteen.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    lyric wrote: »
    I'm not allowed a house party. It'll be fine. I've been served hundreds of times and I've been to hundreds of pubs and clubs since I was sixteen.

    :banghead:

    Do you miss the point that everyone tries to make on purpose or are you actually this naive
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Might be worth remember Hellfire that, yes, some people are young and maybe a bit niave at times.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    What do you mean tries on purpose to make?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I was at a mate's 18th in a pub 2 years ago when I was 24 yet I was still ID'ed, I'm sure they'll ID everyone just incase.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    lyric wrote: »
    You're right. I'll just have to tell my underage friends to borrow this older siblings' ID or just get someone else to buy their drinks.



    Again not a good idea. Using an official piece of identification for fraudulent purposes (including driver's licence and passport) is a criminal offence. The least that can happen is that it is confiscated and your friend's older sibling has to explain to the authorities why they lost it. Then they have to pay for a replacement. One of my colleagues is currently prosecuting someone for this very thing, girl used her mum's licence to buy alcohol. She's getting done for buying it and they're contemplating prosecuting for misusing the licence. Mum has got to pay £50 to get it back from the DVLA on top of that.

    Secondly, getting the older people at the party to buy alcohol for the underage people is the quickest way to get the lights switched on, the music turned off and all of you kicked out the door. The management have explicitly told you they won't tolerate underage drinking, and we've told you the reasons why they will have done so.

    I know you think that the bar are being kill joys, but as has been explained to you, they have so much to lose. If the local police decided to conduct a spot check (as they often do) the bar will most likely have their licence suspended, the bar staff fined and you'll all be kicked out by the police. At the very least being kicked out mid-way through the party is going to be more embarrasing for you than a couple of your friends having to drink coke.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I always use my friends' passports when going out. I've never been arrested. And I went to an 18th last week. Didn't get ID'd once. It all depends on the bouncer/person behind the bar, the time and place and how you look :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    lyric wrote: »
    I always use my friends' passports when going out. I've never been arrested. And I went to an 18th last week. Didn't get ID'd once. It all depends on the bouncer/person behind the bar, the time and place and how you look :)

    So you do not see a problem with commiting fraud? or breaking the law?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    lyric wrote: »
    I always use my friends' passports when going out. I've never been arrested.

    Lucky you.
    Identity Cards Act 2006

    (5) It is an offence for a person to have in his possession or under his control, without reasonable excuse—
    (a) an identity document that is false;
    (b) an identity document that was improperly obtained;
    (c) an identity document that relates to someone else; or

    (d) any apparatus, article or material which, to his knowledge, is or has been specially designed or adapted for the making of false identity documents or to be used in the making of such documents.


    (7) A person guilty of an offence under subsection (5) shall be liable—
    (a) on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years or to a fine, or to both;
    (b) on summary conviction in England and Wales, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding twelve months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both;
    (c) on summary conviction in Scotland or Northern Ireland, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both;



    In section 25 “identity document” means any document that is, or purports to be—
    (a) an ID card;
    (b) a designated document;
    (c) an immigration document;
    (d) a United Kingdom passport (within the meaning of the Immigration Act 1971 (c. 77));
    (e) a passport issued by or on behalf of the authorities of a country or territory outside the United Kingdom or by or on behalf of an international organisation;
    (f) a document that can be used (in some or all circumstances) instead of a passport;
    (g) a UK driving licence; or
    (h) a driving licence issued by or on behalf of the authorities of a country or territory outside the United Kingdom.



    Why do you think Fake ID's off the internet always say "Driver's Permit" or "European Licence" e.t.c? When a fake Driver's licence would be so much more convincing....
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Hold on... you use your friends passports... what, do they magically look like you?
    Xx
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    To be fair, I think we've probably gone over everything people have to say, so we'll close this one. Hope it goes well Lyric :)
This discussion has been closed.