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helppp

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
having an oh my god im ashamed of myself moments. iv just realised iv worked in my current job for four years, on and off :( and its an absolutely crap job with no prospects whatsoever.

i desparately want a new job, i search job websites at least twice weekly but they're all either jobs that are less pay than im on now (which isnt great anyway) or jobs that i think i cant get. i'd really like a job in a school as a teaching assistant or as a heathcare assistant in a hospital but they always say 'need experience' or you need a NVQ in care/teaching. how can i get experience if nobody will give me a chance :(

iv had a few interviews for new jobs but i havent got them, last time i went for a NHS job it was between me and another girl so i suppose thats something, i cant be all bad?

im a qualified nursery nurse so i have a qualification thats equal to level 3 NVQ. is it worth applying for jobs that need nvqs even if i dont have a care nvq?

also does anybody know if you can do teaching assistant or care nvqs at college? i'd be willing to go back to college but i dont think i'd be able to go to university. thats my main question! can i do something at college or am i too old at 25 :/

this post is a bit disjointed but im hoping somebody could help meeee.
thanks!

Comments

  • Olly_BOlly_B Mod-u-like Posts: 222 Settling in
    Hi Firey,

    Sorry to hear that you're having a bad time with your current job. But it's good that you are taking some positive steps to try and find a new career that you feel you'd prefer to work in.

    I think you've got a lot more going for you than you possibly realise. If you can get down to the final two when you've been for jobs before, that's unlikely to be you weren't suitable (just the other person was more suitable).

    You don't say if you currently work as a nursery nurse, but having the qualification puts you in a very good place - being a teaching or healthcare assistant are not massive leaps from what you qualified in, so although I can't tell you if you'd need to requalify, the likelihood is much of what you previously learned can be taken into account.

    Remember that experience needed doesn't have to be a paid full-time job. One suggestion could be that you contact a headteacher at a local school (or senior nursing officer at a local hospital) and explain your position and that you want to switch careers. They'll be the best people to tell you what specific requirements there'll be for that role. More importantly, ask if you could visit and find out more about the roles; either work-shadowing for a day or helping out with extra curricular activities, such as after-school club. Demonstrating enthusiasm and commitment to a role is, in a lot of cases, far more valuable than simply having a qualification; and if any positions become available at the school/hospital you are helping out at, you've got a massive advantage over other candidates.

    There's nothing to stop you going back to most colleges at any age, although there are issues with how your place is funded. Again, it's worth talking to a local college and seeing what options you have. But, don't forget, an employer who spots potential in an individual may be prepared to support them through college, and if you are already getting through to final stages at interviews don't think you have to have the qualification and then get the job. (It could be a great question that you can ask in your interview - "I know I don't meet all the qualifications required, but I'm really keen to learn. What development opportunities would you be able to offer me?")

    It's perfectly OK to proactively go out and find the job you want: build up experience through volunteering, work experience, chatting to potential employers and then you've got a range of evidence if you get an interview.

    Good luck,


    Olly
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