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Claiming back overpaid Tax

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Hi there,

When I started my current job in September I was put on an emergency tax code. This change in April, but for 6 months I was paying £100 month more tax than I should have been. I've talked to my company's Tax Office, who told me to contact the HMRC. I've looked at the HMRC website and it tells me to send a letter to them requesting a tax refund.

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/incometax/overpaid-thro-job.htm

How exactly do I do this? What do I need to say? I'm not really that well informed on this sort of stuff. Any advice is very welcome, thanks :)

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    What where were you doing before september? (Only because it will affect any tax rebate you may be entitled to)

    Apart from that you need to know your employers payroll scheme tax office or scheme number (they should be happy to give this to you). Use this link:Tax Office locator put the name in and find out what centralised HMRC office you need to write to.

    The letter needs to say that you think you have overpaid tax, say what you did during the tax year 5th April - 6th April in question and include originals of all your P45's and your P60's for the tax year. They will then check the records and send you a rebate. Make sure you quote your National Insurance number and give them as much detail as possible in the letter

    Be aware that the centralised offices can be very slow at processing post and often have a 6-8 week backlog, so dont be to concered if it takes a while to hear back from them.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru


    Doing anything with the tax office is a pain in the arse especially if they owe you money. Took me over a year to get back £600 from them that I'd overpaid in student loans (it was deducted from my wages by the inland revenue).

    So good luck, you need to perservere.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Whowhere wrote: »
    Doing anything with the tax office is a pain in the arse especially if they owe you money. Took me over a year to get back £600 from them that I'd overpaid in student loans (it was deducted from my wages by the inland revenue).

    So good luck, you need to perservere.

    Agreed, I think I mentioned that a few posts down in the above thread.

    It is a long drawn out process, but when you think that they have to administer the income taxes of every working person in the nation, it kinda puts things into perspective when you wait a few months to get some money back.

    Still, worth it if you know you're entitled to some money back.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Okay I had this exact same problem with my tax, was paying £100 more than I should have. They wouldn't refund my tax because my previous job hadn't sent them a copy of my p45 and so it went round in circles for months. Then I had a breakthough, what I did was send them a photocopy of my P60 showing how much tax i'd paid for that year, a photocopy of a few payslips (just for good measure) and a snotty letter telling them how badly I needed the money because I needed to pay my rent and buy food. I also asked for any interest back on my overpaid tax. They told me it'd take over 4 weeks to get the money back (i really really needed it for my holiday) but I had a cheque through in just under 2 weeks for £880odd quid. V V V happy.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I had the same problem where they actually sent me a form and said that I may have overpaid on my tax but then after I filled out the form and sent Public Liability Insurance back they said that they had miscalculated and i owed them a small amount.

    So always be wary that they can charge you extra for some things as well
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