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CRB Checks?!?!?!

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Hey

i have recently been made redundant and am franticly looking for a new job. the only problem is most of them say they will do a CRB check.... last Feb i ended up in court for being drunk and disorderly and got a fine. i had also been arressed for the same offence 3 times before and got on the spot fines and cautions etc. will this come up in the CRB check and will it put off employers? i have not come here for a "you got drunk and was stupid so now you have to pay leture" please, I am just looking for advice,

thanks x

p.s do i have to put it down on the application form where it asks if you have ever been convicted of a criminal offence?

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I do not have a lot of information on crb checks but I do know that they will check for any criminal offences. If you have only previously been cautioned and fined it might be possible they have it all logged on the police national computer but not sure if that would count. As for going to court it will again be held on the police national computer. Crb are checked for criminal offences so you could ask at the local citizen advice centre for more information. Yes you do have to declare your convictions.
    Hope this helps?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    thanks for replying, i am just going to not put it down and see what happens :nervous:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ±Lover± wrote: »
    thanks for replying, i am just going to not put it down and see what happens :nervous:

    If they find out, you'll get into trouble for lying.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Melian wrote: »
    If they find out, you'll get into trouble for lying.

    what sort of trouble? would i just not get the job or get sacked?? god this is such a shit situation. i was a drunken idiot but its not like i got nicked for stealing or anything dishonest :( and the funny thing is, i dont even drink anymore.
  • SkiveSkive No discipline. No morality. No respect. New ForestPosts: 15,214 Skive's The Limit
    I was convicted of violent dissorder and never once disclosed it when applying for a job, even before it was 'spent'. Simply because I wouldn't have got any of the jobs I'd been going for if I had.
    D&D isn't that serious a record though. You have to way it up. Do you lie and risk getting found out or do you own up and hope it doesn't affect your application.
    Yesterday is history
    Tomorrow is a mystery
    But today is a gift
    That’s why it’s call the present
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ±Lover± wrote: »
    what sort of trouble? would i just not get the job or get sacked?? god this is such a shit situation. i was a drunken idiot but its not like i got nicked for stealing or anything dishonest :( and the funny thing is, i dont even drink anymore.

    I wouldn't worry about something so minor.
  • Olly_BOlly_B Mod-u-like Posts: 222 Settling in
    Hi,

    I used to do the other end of CRB disclosures; so that when people applied for positions I would have to get them to complete the CRB disclosure and then receive that information back from the CRB.

    CRB disclosures are currently only required when you have significant unsupervisied contact with young people or vulnerable adults, or you work in specific places like schools, care homes or hospitals. They are there to stop paedophiles or those who have a history of committing crimes against vulnerable people from gaining access that could allow them to carry out those activities without anyone noticing.

    A CRB is not there, and can not be used, for making other character judgements. That is illegal.

    So the test the person making the decision has to ask, "does the previous offence demonstrate that they are more likely to abuse their position of trust with a young person/vulnerable adult?"

    In the case of being drunk and disorderly, it would be hard to answer that question with a yes, and therefore it would be unlikely that an otherwise suitable applicant would be turned down on the basis of that. Particularly if you explain that you've stopped drinking since your arrest; so you've taken a positive step.

    It's worth remembering that 1 in 3 men have a criminal conviction likely to appear on their CRB. Please don't think you are the only person for this to happen.

    However, the absolute must is you should admit it when you are asked to declare it. A CRB is essentially checking that the information you have supplied is the same as the police have on their files; so if you said "I've been previously arrested for being drunk and disorderly" and your CRB came back with that information there would be no problem. But if you said "Nothing" and the police record came back with information then there would be an issue about your truthfulness. More people are prevented from taking up roles because they supply wrong information than because of their convictions.

    I hope this helps - please remember that the HR department at your new organisation have probably seen this several times before and they should treat your application and admission with tact. It's illegal for them to pass that information on to anyone who is not involved with the application or (in certain cases) those involved in managing your employment.

    I know plenty of great people who have criminal records who I'd happily trust to look after my kids. I am sure you are one of those people.

    Best wishes,



    Olly
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    There was a thread a while back about someone who had not declared that they had a criminal record and ended up loosing thier job - whilst he had comitted a more serious offence and been in prison I would still urge that you declare it to be on the safe side.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    thanks for the replys guys, especially Olly_B, that was helpfull.

    so far i have just not applied for jobs where it says CRB clearance required, so i'm trying to avoid them.

    i know drunk and disordely is not a huge ordeal but its still going to make me look bad on my application, they would sooner go for somebody whos never been arrested rather than me, whos been arrested 4 times and been to court :( grrr guess i have only got myself to blame :mad:
  • Olly_BOlly_B Mod-u-like Posts: 222 Settling in
    Hi Lover,

    I can totally understand why you feel the way you do about your criminal history, but a good organisation would not turn down an otherwise excellent candidate simply because of their criminal history if it posed no threat to their employment.

    Walk into any office or place of work, and if you had magic eyes, you'd be able to discover the number of people who have a criminal past. As I said in my last email, 1 in 6 people in the country have a criminal record and of those 90% are men, so that is about 1 in 3 men.

    You've said you've stopped drinking as a result of your conviction. I think that's a really positive step, and although you might not want to, it's almost worth being proactive in mentioning it. Some employers, especially those working with disengaged young people, like people with a bit of 'life experience'.

    Olly
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I am female, so thats means i am one of only a few girls with a criminal record :(

    Also, was filling out an application form yesterday, it said "have you ever been convicted of a criminal act".... what does it mean when it says convicted?? i thought convicts were prisioners lol x
  • Olly_BOlly_B Mod-u-like Posts: 222 Settling in
    Hi Lover,

    A criminal conviction is anything where you have been convicted in a court of law; ie you were taken to court and the judge/jury decided that you were guilty of that offence. It does not include police cautions or reprimands.

    You may find it useful to talk to someone at Nacro, on (freephone) 0800 0181 259 or 020 7840 6464.

    Hope that helps...


    Olly
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    does a CRB check only show up crimes which were committed in the UK?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    drunk and disorderly

    hi im 18 i was 17 when i got aressted for bein drunk and disorderly but it was a first time offence and they didn't caution me first they just gave me the 80 quid fine and because i didn't pay ive just got a call from them saying i need to go to my nearest police station and ill probly be delt with by the courts but it was the first time ive been in trouble with the police?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    well tbh
    u've brought this on yourself by not paying the fine
    of course they are going to take you to court for not paying a fine
    this will probaly go down on record and be seen by the CRB checks
    i'm not 100% but thats what i think will happen
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    AFAIK anything that's more than a caution shows up on CRB? (Maybe even cautions?)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    xxrach09xx wrote: »
    hi im 18 i was 17 when i got aressted for bein drunk and disorderly but it was a first time offence and they didn't caution me first they just gave me the 80 quid fine and because i didn't pay ive just got a call from them saying i need to go to my nearest police station and ill probly be delt with by the courts but it was the first time ive been in trouble with the police?



    If you had just paid the fine then that would have been the end of it. You wouldn't have had a criminal record, only a police one (which is only checkable by the police).
    By not paying the fine, you will get a criminal conviction, and a bigger fine than you would have had normally, it's usually doubled with costs added on.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    xxrach09xx wrote: »
    hi im 18 i was 17 when i got aressted for bein drunk and disorderly but it was a first time offence and they didn't caution me first they just gave me the 80 quid fine and because i didn't pay ive just got a call from them saying i need to go to my nearest police station and ill probly be delt with by the courts but it was the first time ive been in trouble with the police?

    Why didn't you just pay the fine?!
  • Olly_BOlly_B Mod-u-like Posts: 222 Settling in
    Hi xxrach09xx,

    As others have said, a penalty fine for being drunk and disorderly won't usually appear on a CRB, although a caution would. And if your case is taken to court then the outcome of that would appear on your CRB. However, it's worth stating that in both these cases it's unlikely that it would affect your employment with regards to a CRB. More information about CRBs.

    It's worth being proactive about your fine, because it won't go away and trying to ignore it will only make things worse. The police have said that the cases "may" go to court (bear in mind it is very expensive to put someone through court, so they like to avoid it if they can). Going to a police station and explain your situation and see what happens. If you can't afford to pay £80 in one go, then offer to pay what you can in installments.


    Olly
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Olly_B wrote: »
    Going to a police station and explain your situation and see what happens. If you can't afford to pay £80 in one go, then offer to pay what you can in installments.


    Olly


    \
    Hi Olly,
    I don't like correcting people but it's worth pointing out that this isn't possible. Once a PND is submitted by the officer it is sent to the central ticket office for that district. It is kept there until the time limit has been reached. If it is paid then it is filed never to be seen from again (even we as PCs and PCSOs aren't told routinely if they have been paid.)
    If it is unpaid the officer who issued the ticket is informed (so they can start finding all the original evidence) and the ticket is sent to the district court, it is then changed from being a police fine to a court fine.
    The court will then usually automatically double the fine and give you another set period of time in which to pay. If after this point you still haven't paid you will be summonsed to court.

    Your local police station has NO way of collecting the money from you or cancelling/amending the ticket once it has been submitted to the central ticket office, all the tickets are sequentially numbered so once one has been issued they can be kept track of.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Is paying a fine an admission of guilt in the same way accepting a caution is? Just wondering.

    TBH my sister got a fine albeit for littering and she just apologised though this was to the council and they said they would let her off the fine if she helped out litter picking for a morning. I don't know if it's the same for D&D fines though.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ShyBoy wrote: »
    Is paying a fine an admission of guilt in the same way accepting a caution is? Just wondering.


    No. If you accept a PND then you are discharging your guilt. You are paying to, in effect, erase the matter from memory. The only record that you will ever have had a PND is on the police national computer, reason being you can only be issued PND's in certain circumstances, and in some cases if you've already had several the it allows the officer to make a judgment as to wether another one is appropriate or not.
    TBH my sister got a fine albeit for littering and she just apologised though this was to the council and they said they would let her off the fine if she helped out litter picking for a morning. I don't know if it's the same for D&D fines though.



    If she got the fine from the council then it isn't the same as a police PND. There isn't even a police record for one of these.
    In some city centres police officers patrol with street cleaning equipment. If they catch someone having a piss then the choices are cleaning it, paying a fine or being arrested.
  • Olly_BOlly_B Mod-u-like Posts: 222 Settling in
    Whowhere wrote: »
    \
    Hi Olly,
    I don't like correcting people but it's worth pointing out that this isn't possible. Once a PND is submitted by the officer it is sent to the central ticket office for that district. It is kept there until the time limit has been reached. If it is paid then it is filed never to be seen from again (even we as PCs and PCSOs aren't told routinely if they have been paid.)

    Hi,

    No problem on being corrected and thanks for the info. I assumed, perhaps wrongly, that police fines are the same as court fines, where they must take into account the financial circumstances of the offender. That doesn't necessarily reduce the fine amount, but the way in which it is paid.

    Olly
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    No problemo, it does become a court fine, but only if you don't pay it and end up in court.
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