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Mitigating Circumstances

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
I'm still have some issues with college and their inability to understand that I can't use the course materials that they give me and them generally acting as though they know more about my needs than my consultant at the eye infirmary and myself. (they don't have a clue) Anyway, for that reason I may not do as well in my course as I could do if I was given materials in appropriate format. (Large print on grey A4 paper) They've been given loads of medical evidence, so it's not just me being picky.

I've heard some people talk about mitigating circumstances and I think I may have one. What actually happesn with them? I'm thinking more for university entry and stuff.

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    As in exams? You must talk to your exams officer at college who will submit a mitigating circumstances form to the exams board whoever that is who will consider your results and whether you had any significant disadvantage that would allow your results to be modified.

    I don't know how universities feel about it, but at a push you might be able to get your entrance requirements lowered a grade or two - but from what I can tell they normally do that anyway (so long as it's not Oxbridge or the course isn't oversubscribed).

    From a university's point of view, if you attained 'x' standard because you are 'x' good, but someone got 'x+grade' standard because they're 'x+grade' good, then they probably want to pick the better applicant. But you if got 'x' standard even though you're 'x+grade' competent because your exam went wrong or something then the exam board itself will intervene.

    As for your college being a bit crap - I don't know what compensation is available for that specifically - I think it would be on merit and how you come across in your interview. I'm just guessing though, I don't know how universities take it into account.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The mitigating circumstances are around the exams that you take and the subsequent grades that you recieve. I wouldn't expect them to be considered by the university as your grades would already have been adjusted to compensate.

    The process for claiming for mitigating circumstances should be explained when / before you sit the exams.

    I do not know how the process would apply to coursework.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I had mitigating cirumstances for one of my A levels, because of illness. It was a coursework-heavy subject and I was supposed to be assessed on 2 major projects plus exams. I really struggled with the second project, so my grade was based just on one project and the exams. You still have to put in the donkey work, basically. They just make reasonable adjustments so you don't end up getting shafted.

    I just got a note from my consultant detailing the problems I was having and how it might have affected my studies, and gave it to my tutor. She sorted the rest out. Bear in mind, though, this was 10 years ago, so things might have changed. I'd ask your tutor and see what the deal is.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ShyBoy wrote: »
    As in exams? You must talk to your exams officer at college who will submit a mitigating circumstances form to the exams board whoever that is who will consider your results and whether you had any significant disadvantage that would allow your results to be modified.

    Exams and coursework. I'm now behind because the materials are really not accessible.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You can talk to the exams officer and your tutor but in complete honesty I'd be surprised if you qualify. Mitigating circumstances are usually short term issues that mean you perform abnormally because of an immediate problem. The example would be short term illness or injury, like when I destroyed my ankle the weekend before my GCSEs started, a record was taken so that if my results didn't reflect my expected performance the injury, effect of the pain killers and pain I was is could be taken into consideration.

    Where there might be some consideration made is when applying for university, if you've got off to a bad start to the year due to lack of adaptation then the uni's may be willing to make you a lower offer, or more likely, be more forgiving if you were to miss the grades for your offer.

    That said, you'll find very few people are willing to give you any leeway if your main problem is now that you are getting large print on A3 rather than A4. While reasonable adjustment needs to be made, making stuff bigger would be a reasonable adjustment and the A3 is not unreasonable.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    That said, you'll find very few people are willing to give you any leeway if your main problem is now that you are getting large print on A3 rather than A4. While reasonable adjustment needs to be made, making stuff bigger would be a reasonable adjustment and the A3 is not unreasonable.

    Its still hard to read the 'large print' that is on A3. It still isn't always big enough for me to read. (even some of my sighted friends have trouble reading some of it because of the way it's printed)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Actually just as an aside (and not presuming to say that this applies for Melian herself) but nystagmus suffers can have more problems with A3 large print as it forces you to take in a wider area, putting more stress on the eyes and making vision worse. I hope that's explained well enough, it's a little difficult.
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