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New rant on the perception of students

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
Hey guys

My rant has just gone up on the website. It's about how annoying people are who call student's lazy, tax-dodging hippies and how it's about time a new, fresher more accurate perception emerged. You can find it here:-

http://www.thesite.org.uk/community/reallife/rants/givestudentsachance

Hope you enjoy it!

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    All well and good, but there are still relatively few students who put in the equivalent of a full time job into their courses...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It's better than the majority of the rants on here, author isn't stupid and ill informed for one thing.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Can't agree with him anymore. That's a pretty good rant.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    All well and good, but there are still relatively few students who put in the equivalent of a full time job into their courses...

    :yes:

    Not many I know that put the same as a part time job into their course ;)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    g_angel wrote: »
    :yes:

    Not many I know that put the same as a part time job into their course ;)

    I do when exams are near!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    All well and good, but there are still relatively few students who put in the equivalent of a full time job into their courses...

    The amount of work people put in at uni comes in fits and starts. You may have one week where you go to your lectures, spend a couple of hours of reading and that's it. Other weeks you may have three essays in and put the equivalent of a 40 hour week in if not more. Workload also significantly increases in the final two years.So whilst first year may seem easy going in temrs of work, a lot of people I know knuckled down for their final two years.

    It's also worth bearing in mind that the education you receive at uni isn't confined to academic matters. There's a lot of life skills to be learnt in socialising, going to socieities or having a part time job.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    squeal wrote: »
    I do when exams are near!

    Only a short part of the year though :razz:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The amount of work people put in at uni comes in fits and starts. You may have one week where you go to your lectures, spend a couple of hours of reading and that's it. Other weeks you may have three essays in and put the equivalent of a 40 hour week in if not more. Workload also significantly increases in the final two years.So whilst first year may seem easy going in temrs of work, a lot of people I know knuckled down for their final two years.

    ... and plenty I know did sod all for the first two years, and a bit more in the third, only really getting any work done around exam time etc.
    It's also worth bearing in mind that the education you receive at uni isn't confined to academic matters. There's a lot of life skills to be learnt in socialising, going to socieities or having a part time job.

    But this isn't part of your University course though. It's just 'life'. I didn't got to uni, but managed to learn all of these things out there experiencing normal life.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    g_angel wrote: »
    Only a short part of the year though :razz:

    Well and around when assignments are due but I do spend about 3 hours a night on other work from the lectures in the day. Next year will be worse though!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'd still defy almost any student to put hand on heart and say they put in an average of at least 40 hours a week into their academic study, 48 weeks a year.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    squeal wrote: »
    Well and around when assignments are due but I do spend about 3 hours a night on other work from the lectures in the day. Next year will be worse though!

    I know you're doing a tougher/more intensive degree than most and so you're likely to be the exception, rather than the rule.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    g_angel wrote: »
    I know you're doing a tougher/more intensive degree than most and so you're likely to be the exception, rather than the rule.

    What I wanted to get across in the article was that saying 'all students are x' was a stupid idea as you do get such a diverse mix of people at university. so while some students do laze about, not all do.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    What I wanted to get across in the article was that saying 'all students are x' was a stupid idea as you do get such a diverse mix of people at university. so while some students do laze about, not all do.

    Not all, but the majority of people I knew had generally a very easy ride for at least the first two years, and a chunk of the third.

    Thing is you can apply the argument of 'all being a stupid idea' to almost anything/any group of people really. There are always going to be a number of people that will think this, and I know people have been saying what you're saying for a long time now. It's never going to change, simply because so many students still have a very easy ride, and so people will judge as so.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I agree that stereotyping is a difficult area to navigate around but I think that it is possible to change/update them. It's a hard task, but I think that more emphasis needs to be put on showing the student body in its true light as people who know when to party and when to study.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I agree that stereotyping is a difficult area to navigate around but I think that it is possible to change/update them. It's a hard task, but I think that more emphasis needs to be put on showing the student body in its true light as people who know when to party and when to study.

    You know what though, I think that is going to be a hell of a lot of effort for nigh on zero results.

    Don't get me wrong, I know some people put in some hellish hours studying (especially Med students, right Go_away?), but I also know many, many more than do the polar opposite, only whinging about having "so much to do" as they've fucked around all year and then they have to cram everything into the last few weeks.

    Simply put, I don't think this true light is as clearly defined as you would like to think, or make out.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    This isn't going to make me popular, but I readily admit I have a very negative perception of students. Given that I'm about to become one again, that might seem odd. Who knows, my opinion on this may yet change. Regardless, I cannot sympathise with people who complain endlessly that they're down to their last £20, yet are busy planning the third night out in a week. Yes, everyone deserves - needs, even - a night out every now and then, but life isn't all about getting pissed! Do I believe all students are like this? Certainly not. But many are.

    When many people hear the word "student", the type of person that immediately comes to mind is someone scruffy and lazy. This is partly because of shows such as The Young Ones. Whilst that was a very funny comedy, no one can deny that it shows students in a very bad light. These ideas still exist to this day. Even nowadays, in the days of student fees and debt, many people still hold on to the old stereotypes. These are largely inaccurate, but students don't do themselves any favours in this category.

    On another note, Dom seems a very sound guy.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You get an ever-increasing proportion of people, particularly at the top 10 universities, who diligently get their 1st/2.1 whilst partaking in a ton of extracurriculars and sports teams whilst doing part-time work whilst volunteering whilst doing internships in vacations whilst getting their careers in order and getting a good job lined up for when they finish.

    However, thats still hugely a minority, and I feel the 'student' stereotype is largely justified when treating 'students' as one entity. Particularly at bottom-end universities, the modal grade is a 2.2, and so many people completely waste 3-4 years of university. Not pulling their weight with academics, and wasting time drinking with their group of mates the whole time rather than useful 'socialising' or networking.

    If you're in the minority that make the most of your university time you'll be rewarded for it, and you'll stand out against the mass army of student loafers - let them own the negative stereotype they put on themselves.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I know some people put in some hellish hours studying (especially Med students, right Go_away?)

    Depends on the ones you talk to ;) I've only just got back from the library, have been revising this way for about 11 weeks, but I know that my overall mark will be lower than the stupidly bright friend of mine who has just started working this week.

    Interesting rant though, the first one in ages that didn't make me go :rolleyes:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    tinkler wrote: »
    Particularly at bottom-end universities, the modal grade is a 2.2, and so many people completely waste 3-4 years of university. Not pulling their weight with academics, and wasting time drinking with their group of mates the whole time rather than useful 'socialising' or networking.

    That's a matter of opinion! My mum got a 2.2 and whilst I don't want to say what her job is she's doing pretty well and has just got a promotion. Plus I think plenty of posters on here have got a 2.2 at uni and are very successful. So it isn't exactly a 'waste'.

    My opinion generally to this topic is that laziness exists beyond the realm of university so I don't understand why the trend seems to be to solely emphasise this within the student population. The only reason I can think of is bitterness.

    Good rant anywho :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    That's a matter of opinion! My mum got a 2.2 and whilst I don't want to say what her job is she's doing pretty well and has just got a promotion. Plus I think plenty of posters on here have got a 2.2 at uni and are very successful. So it isn't exactly a 'waste'.

    :yes:

    My dad got a third from a *shockhorror* polytechnic (now Coventry Uni) and he's just retired from a really very well paid MD job.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    stargalaxy wrote: »

    When many people hear the word "student", the type of person that immediately comes to mind is someone scruffy and lazy. This is partly because of shows such as The Young Ones. Whilst that was a very funny comedy, no one can deny that it shows students in a very bad light. QUOTE]


    I was thinking about including a bit on The Young Ones in the rant actually. There is definitely a gap available in the market for a more accurate portrayal of students in the media. What makes it difficult is to show a more up to date image without trading in stereotypes. Maybe something like 'a week in the life of a student' documentary. Hopefully not of a student who sits in the pub all week!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sure?

    A school day with eight 40 minute lessons is 5 hours 20 mins a day, which is less than 27 hours a week. That would require at least 13 hours a week actually working on homework. Not to mention that you'd need to do all that for 48 weeks a year, rather than the 40 that most schools do.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Well good for you, but as you say, you are unusual.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'd still defy almost any student to put hand on heart and say they put in an average of at least 40 hours a week into their academic study, 48 weeks a year.
    In my final year I managed to juggle a 20-hour per week (plus 10 hours travelling) job with lectures, coursework, revision and my dissertation. It really pissed me off to see students who spent literally no time on their uni work or part time work, then moaned about falling behind with studies or having no money. Some say uni is supposed to make a well-rounded person, but I know plenty who came out still the same ignorant, lazy gits, many with a silver spoon.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    tinkler wrote: »
    However, thats still hugely a minority, and I feel the 'student' stereotype is largely justified when treating 'students' as one entity. Particularly at bottom-end universities, the modal grade is a 2.2, and so many people completely waste 3-4 years of university. Not pulling their weight with academics, and wasting time drinking with their group of mates the whole time rather than useful 'socialising' or networking.

    Why does socialising have to be useful? I fall between the two categories you describe - I worked hard, worked part time and in vacations in jobs that would help equip me with the skills I needed not just bar work, volunteered, helped to set up and run a new and succesful society and got my 2.1.

    I also went to an ex-poly university and have secured a place on a fairly competitive graduate scheme which has nothing to so with useful 'socialising', as you put it. Quite a lot of the socialising I did was generally in the pub for quite a few hours with friends, and never mind any of the pretentious networking bollocks.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    In my final year I managed to juggle a 20-hour per week (plus 10 hours travelling) job with lectures, coursework, revision and my dissertation. It really pissed me off to see students who spent literally no time on their uni work or part time work, then moaned about falling behind with studies or having no money. Some say uni is supposed to make a well-rounded person, but I know plenty who came out still the same ignorant, lazy gits, many with a silver spoon.
    :yes:
    I did a 20 hour a week job, commuted 3.5-4 hours a day to uni and had about 3 articles a night to read over this last year, not to mention coursework. We only had 3 hours contact time per module (so 6 hours a week) and were expected to do 20 hours study per module per week. Admittedly I didn't do the 20 hours per module per week thing because I was knackered from my job but still, I did work very hard. Also all 3 years of my degree counted.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I was thinking about including a bit on The Young Ones in the rant actually. There is definitely a gap available in the market for a more accurate portrayal of students in the media. What makes it difficult is to show a more up to date image without trading in stereotypes. Maybe something like 'a week in the life of a student' documentary. Hopefully not of a student who sits in the pub all week!
    I would have nothing against that. Thing is, the reason The Young Ones worked was because it was so funny, and because it was completely different to anything else around at the time. This sort of comedy was very rare in the 1980s.

    You can't deny that there's some truth in those stereotypes in The Young Ones, though. Take Neil, for instance. He is a self-proclaimed hippy. He's also a clinically-depressed vegetarian and environmentalist studying Peace Studies who has no friends. Sounds much like one or two members of P&D, if you ask me. I'm not even at uni yet, and I've already met countless wankers like Rick Pratt. :p
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    In my experience, I'd say students at so called "top" unis, drink and party just as hard, if not harder than those from "lower" unis, tinkler.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Have to say in my experience your course is far more likely to affect the work: life ratio far more than the uni.
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