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TV License

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Just a little warning really, that when you buy one, the swines date it from the 1st of the month you bought it in, so if you buy it on 30th September it will expire on 31st August the following year, result being you only really get 11 months for your money rather than 12. So if you are buying one for the first time/are a student, it may be worth thinking about when you buy it.

Had a nice 'discussion' on the phone with them earlier, and they have finally agreed to start mine from 1st October rather than September (I did it online on 30th Sep).
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Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Oh, I knew that because the lady in the Post Office told me.

    The BBC are thieving cunts, but lets not start with that, because I'll only get angry. Except to say that I hope someone blows the place up, with everyone inside it (especially Graham Norton).
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I appreciate the BBC in times of war - at least you can get a semi balanced report on what's happening overseas, Fox and CNN only report pro American stuff most of the time, Fox is really bad.

    It's times like this you see the benefit of having a new channel not supported by TV adverts that may offend sponsors.

    But at all other times there's very little worth watching on the BBC
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm contemplating buying a TV license, so that I can get a freeview box to watch Film four. It seems kinda perverse that I have to pay the BBC in order to watch FilmFour but... such is life. I've got the impression that I need to buy a whole year, is this right? Can I not just buy a month's worth in case I think it's just not worth it?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Why do you need a license to watch freeview, unless of course you haven't got a TV at the moment.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    katralla wrote:
    I'm contemplating buying a TV license, so that I can get a freeview box to watch Film four. It seems kinda perverse that I have to pay the BBC in order to watch FilmFour but... such is life. I've got the impression that I need to buy a whole year, is this right? Can I not just buy a month's worth in case I think it's just not worth it?
    I think you can just set up a Direct Debit and cancel it after a month. And even if you buy a years worth, you can claim back any unused quarters of the licence. So if after two months you decided you didn't want it any more, you could claim back 3/4 of the licence fee.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The direct debit system for the tv license is very very strange, so if you're thinking about cancelling it after a short time then don't do it that way.

    If you have a tv at the moment then you should have a tv license so I am a little confused.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    RubberSkin wrote:
    Why do you need a license to watch freeview, unless of course you haven't got a TV at the moment.

    If you receive a television signal- either through an aerial, cable or satellite- you need a TV License by law. Owning a TV doesn't necessarily mean you need a license, providing you don't watch TV programmes on it.

    The BBC will take you to court, fine you and put you in prison if you do not pay them their money.

    The BBC have a large stake in Freeview, so by watching Freeview you are taking advantage of the BBC's services.

    You can pay monthly but you can't buy a license for a month. You can only claim back full unused quarters, so if you have the license for one day you have to pay for three months.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I thought you had to have a license if you had a tv, video, pc tv card, freeview box anything that can receive a bbc signal. Thats what the licensing bloke said when he came round here last month.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think you may be able to get away with it if you own a tv with no means of receiving a signal, although I wouldn't really like to try it (and can't think why you would).

    Direct debit wise, they make you pay the first six months upfront and then they collect monthly payments every month, so for the first 6 months you are paying for your current one, then for the next 6 months you are paying towards the next one. It's an ok system if you are going to have a tv license for ever more, but it's a little dubious if not.
  • littlemissylittlemissy knit chick Posts: 9,972
    If your tv isn't tuned in then you don't need to pay the license. If you are just using it to watch DVDs then you should be fine.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    RubberSkin wrote:
    I thought you had to have a license if you had a tv, video, pc tv card, freeview box anything that can receive a bbc signal. Thats what the licensing bloke said when he came round here last month.

    You've been lied to- TV Licensing are good at that.

    If you do not use your TV to receive a TV signal, then you do not need a license. We had a TV for two years which we used simply to watch videos and DVDs on, and we did not need or buy a license for that.

    It is also up to TV Licensing to prove that you received a TV signal. Bear in mind that they have no rights of access to your property, so it's normally a good idea to be as arsey as possible with them.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    so it's normally a good idea to be as arsey as possible with them.


    Oh i am, even though we have a license. I thoroughly disagree with the license and the fact a B&W one is only £44. That's your choice to watch B&W the signal is still transmitted in colour and it's not any cheaper for them to transmit to a B&W TV.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Interestingly, you don't have to fill in one of those little forms when you buy a new freeview box, just a new TV. So computer monitors and freeview boxes all round then?

    Would having a Sky dish on the side of your house be proof that you're recieving a TV signal? Or could Sky at least tell them that you are?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Interestingly, you don't have to fill in one of those little forms when you buy a new freeview box, just a new TV. So computer monitors and freeview boxes all round then?

    When i bought my freeview box from Argos last year they wanted my name and address.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    RubberSkin wrote:
    I thought you had to have a license if you had a tv, video, pc tv card, freeview box anything that can receive a bbc signal. Thats what the licensing bloke said when he came round here last month.
    nah. Ive got a tellybox which is used for DVDs but its not connected to the ariel and I think the ariels broken even if i wanted to (which I dont particularly) Weve had the TV licence people round and they were satisfied with that.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Would having a Sky dish on the side of your house be proof that you're recieving a TV signal? Or could Sky at least tell them that you are?

    Sky have to tell them. If you have a subscription then that's good proof, just having a dish on the wall isn't.

    We have a dish on the wall but don't get Sky, it was left over from the previous owners.

    I normally tell them that they're not having my address when I buy TV equipment, unless they need it for delivery or warranty.

    I'm always out when the licensing people come round to ours, its a shame, I've got several choice words for those thieving little cunts. Every single employee of the BBC should be put in prison, corrupt extortioners that they are.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Nice to see lawyers having such respect for the laws of the land Kermit ;)

    To everyone concerned: every day I become a bigger fan of the TV Licence. And I suspect many of you will eventually, even if you are against it now.

    Just as few people in their right minds would want to see our national treasures, paintings, sculptures etc sold for cash because they themselves don't go to museums, nobody in their right mind should want the BBC to lose its licence and become another ITV.

    The BBC is a crown jewel and an indescribable cultural asset to this country. All the quality programming, all the radio stations, everything would be lost or dumbed down to worthless commercial rubbish if the licence was taken away. I'm sorry for those who don't like paying or who don't watch the BBC channels, but to put it bluntly, the greater good of the nation is as stake here, so tough luck.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I quite agree Aladdin, how on earth would the nation cope with advert breaks in the middle of Eastenders? And I think we should call a day of official mourning when we lose such gems as Britain's Worst Toilet, Chris Moyles' knob jokes and Davina McCall's chatshow.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Aladdin wrote:
    All the quality programming, all the radio stations, everything would be lost or dumbed down to worthless commercial rubbish if the licence was taken away.
    Or we'd end up with programmes like The West Wing, The Soprano's, Peep Show, The Simpsons, Brass Eye, all products of commercial TV. I wouldn't mind the BBC going commercial, but as a subscription-based service, rather than being funded by advertising. It'd be nice to have at least one channel that didn't kiss the arse of advertisers over viewers. Basically, the TV licence, but voluntary, because I would bet that the majority of people that currently have a TV, would subscribe to a BBC service anyway. Don't know how competitive a company relying on subscriptions could be though.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Or we'd end up with programmes like The West Wing, The Soprano's, Peep Show, The Simpsons, Brass Eye, all products of commercial TV.

    And where did both the makers of Peep Show and Brass Eye get their start? Oh, that would be the BBC then.

    Virtually all the big comedy shows and comediens in the UK at the moment got their start through the BBC.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    I quite agree Aladdin, how on earth would the nation cope with advert breaks in the middle of Eastenders? And I think we should call a day of official mourning when we lose such gems as Britain's Worst Toilet, Chris Moyles' knob jokes and Davina McCall's chatshow.
    For every Britain's Worst Toilet there are 40 quality programmes shown, many of which are simply not found anywhere else- as you should know.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    budda wrote:
    And where did both the makers of Peep Show and Brass Eye get their start? Oh, that would be the BBC then.

    Virtually all the big comedy shows and comediens in the UK at the moment got their start through the BBC.
    Peter Kay then. Comedy is unique in that most people start out on radio, and since the BBC seems to have a monopoly on that, they can pretty much cherry pick the best talent from comedy. But the claim that commercial TV results in a lowering of standards is completely unfounded, and American TV particlularly over the past ten or so years, proves that. Nor does it result in minority interest programmes disappearing, unless the BBC was secretly involved in the making of Queer as Folk too?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Aladdin wrote:
    For every Britain's Worst Toilet there are 40 quality programmes shown, many of which are simply not found anywhere else- as you should know.

    There are?

    Name some that wouldn't be made by a commercial channel.

    And for all the attacks on ITV, I can only presume that you don't watch it very often. It's the BBC with the "celebrity" fixation (How do you solve a problem like Strictly Come Celebrity Dance Fever?, anyone?)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    There are?

    Name some that wouldn't be made by a commercial channel.
    In theory many could be done by a commercial channel. In practice however, they will not be made by any commercial channel, because the BBC

    1) has a unique financing system that allows it to go where others won't go

    2) is a lot more free from viewing figures than any commercial channel can ever be, and as such can experiment more and create quality programming when it has to

    One way or another, I think of Coast, Blue Planet, Planet Earth, the excellent comedy talentthat has emerged from the BBC over the years, Radio 4, etc etc etc and ask myself: where is the commercial TV equivalent? Nowhere to be seen, that's where.

    I guess you will never be able to look at the BBC with impartial eyes due to the visceral and irrational hatred you appear to have for the corporation, but there is a great deal more to the BBC than the 2 terrestrial channels, and the contributions, both direct and indirect, that it makes to this country's cultural wealth are invaluable.
    And for all the attacks on ITV, I can only presume that you don't watch it very often.
    I try to avoid it, yes. I'm not the only one, judging by the plummeting ratings the channel is getting.

    It's more or less universally agreed in the industry that ITV is at its most pisspoor ever at the moment.
    It's the BBC with the "celebrity" fixation (How do you solve a problem like Strictly Come Celebrity Dance Fever?, anyone?)
    Yeah, for 2 hours a week during the Saturday evening family entertainment spot.

    If the BBC wasn't doing that you'd be the first one here complaining about the BBC only doing high brow programmes that most people in the country don't care for.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I partially agree with you Kermit, there are certainly things that the BBC does that there really isnt any need for, those fancy logo things for a start.

    However, having said that Radio 4 is pretty much the best cultural achievement of the last 100 years and that wouldnt have happened if the licence fee didnt exist.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Why does ITV being shit equal commercial TV being shit? ITV has always been shit. It was started on gameshows and soap operas, and it hasn't changed since. But I didn't hear anyone complaining when E4, Film Four and More 4 came onto freeview.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I don't think anyone is saying commercial TV is shit. But the BBC fills a gap no commercial channel provides, and if the licence were to be scrapped it would be a great loss for the country.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Aladdin wrote:
    I don't think anyone is saying commercial TV is shit. But the BBC fills a gap no commercial channel provides, and if the licence were to be scrapped it would be a great loss for the country.
    Yeah, you've said that before, but I'm still at a loss as to what this gap is. Quality programmes? Nope. Niche programmes? Nope (especially with all the digital channels now).
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    So you don't think the loss of BBC3 (which is where comedy like Little Britain got it's first tv airing), BBC4, BBC New 24, CBeebies (about the only vaguely educational kids tv around) would be a shame? I haven't come across any comercial channel that puts out stuff like they do.

    Commercial channels have to please their advertisers, so can't take risks with new stuff, unlike the BBC which can. Have you ever used the BBC website? BBC News is the homepage of many because of the relatively unbiased reporting it provides.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    So you don't think the loss of BBC3 (which is where comedy like Little Britain got it's first tv airing), BBC4, BBC New 24, CBeebies (about the only vaguely educational kids tv around) would be a shame? I haven't come across any comercial channel that puts out stuff like they do.
    I love the BBC, and I don't have a problem paying the licence fee because I watch their programmes so much. But I don't think that my entertainment should be subsidised by anyone else. I'll pay for what I want to watch, you pay for what you want. There's no evidence to suggest that the quality of programming (however you measure that) is related to whether or not the channel is commercial. How do you think all the big American actors and writers got their big breaks? Did they all come over to the BBC too?
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