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Starting at College

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
I am currently a year 11. I am being home schooled but do my exams in school as I am still heavily linked with them. In other words working at home. This all happened after 3 years of depression, running away to places often and a suicide attempt.

I am now looking at my options for 16+.

I really dont know if I will be able to handle college or If I will get the grades to go into do A-Level.

I kind of want to. Kind of dont.

Can anyone enlighten me on what College is REALLY like?

Thank you!

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I absolutely LOVED college!I hated secondary school, but found college amazing. Even know when i'm in my second year in uni, i still look back on college as the best time ever.

    As to what it is really like, i would think it would depend upon the person in question, and you will only get out of it what you put in. If you are worried about doing academic subjects like maths and english, why don't you try something more vocational.If it is a half way decent college it will do things like beauty, tourism, mechanics, childcare, theatre, art and sports plus many others. If push comes to shove, you could always try an apprentiship. But don't think that once you chose a course you are stuch with it. The new AS and A level system is very flexible.as you can study subjects for 2 years for a full A level, 1 year for an AS, and you can also drop subjects, as long as you keep a minimum of 3.

    I would definelty reccomend college, as although it won't be for everyone, i think it is very important to have more qualifications than GCSE's. On Heindsight, i wish i would have done a cooking course instead of the IB (kind of equivalent to 6 A levels), but hey life goes on!

    Hope this helps! :thumb:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i think you should give it a go, it'll be a chance for you to make new friends and maybe make a fresh start.

    college for me was just a bit like school only we had free periods, you called the teachers by their first names, you could wear what you want and there was none of the nasty bitching that goes on at school.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i loved college. oohh i miss it so much, all my college lot still keep intouch, there's less pressure than there was at school and poeple are so much friendlier, and you actually get treated like an adult. i would say go for it, you can always drop out and try something different the year after.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm in my second year of college and I'm loving it. I'm doing a BND in Music Technology, so I can't comment on A-Levels, but I can tell you college is awesome anyway. I've met people who are more in tune to what I like, and we get well, you've got more freedom than school, which, shouldn't matter to you if you were home schooled. The difference though is great.

    It's an experience, it's fun and you'll learn about the subjects you care more about, as opposed to GCSE where you're doing more than you really feel you want or need.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm a first year at Uni now, but college was amazing!

    I had great friends in school, but i met all my current friends at college. Like someone else said, unlike school, there's no bitching, loads of free periods and generally much more relaxed atmosphere. The people are far less judgemental, and you get all sorts of characters. You're alot more free to express yourself, and unlike school, no one really gives a toss what you're doing, and won't judge you. I think the GCSE process filtered out a lot of the scum that went to my school. (my school was one of the worst in the area, my college in the top 10 in the country).

    Oh and parties! Yeah it's mainly about girls and all night parties. far more than Uni looking back.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Thanks guys for all your experiences.

    I would love to do A-Levels, namely Health and Social Care, English Literature, Media Stuides and possibly Film Studies or Theatre Technical Studies. I just dont know if I will get the GCSE's I want.

    If I dont I am going to be left at doing a GNVQ or National Diploma/Certificate Course, most likely Health and Social care or Childcare. Which I dont really want to resort to as A-Levels get me into Uni and as far as I know of anyway, other qualifications dont. Is that right or am i missunderstanding what I have been reading?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    studying for 5 a-levels, are you sure you want to take that much on?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    possibly Film Studies or Theatre Technical Studies.

    Or no way would I do five. One will be hard enough for me as by the time I start college I wont have been in a class situation for over 2 years.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I also liked Secondary School, but really hated 6th Form, may have just been my schooo, but I only stayed there for one out of the two years, and then went to college. I am on my 2nd One Year course, and wished that I had joint the year I joint 6th Form, as I could then be on my 1st year of my last 2 year course, and so...be ahead of things!! :crying:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Or no way would I do five. One will be hard enough for me as by the time I start college I wont have been in a class situation for over 2 years.

    sorry i assumed you'd be doing AVCE health and social care, didn't realise you could do it as a standard as/a-level. if you do AVCE it's the same as doing an a-level in a year.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i think you should give it a go, it'll be a chance for you to make new friends and maybe make a fresh start.

    college for me was just a bit like school only we had free periods, you called the teachers by their first names, you could wear what you want and there was none of the nasty bitching that goes on at school.
    What she said. Although there's a *bit* of the bitching, there isn't as much, 'cause there are more people who are like you :yes:.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Hey hun,

    I emailed you yesterday about.. erm something else! lol :rolleyes:

    Anyway, I think you should go for college. I've just finished and miss is madly. It was hard work but was worth it. You make loads of great new friends etc! :thumb:

    Naomi
    xxxx
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i think you should give it a go, it'll be a chance for you to make new friends and maybe make a fresh start.

    college for me was just a bit like school only we had free periods, you called the teachers by their first names, you could wear what you want and there was none of the nasty bitching that goes on at school.

    Yeah. The only problem I found with free periods is that I have too many of them now... (I have 10)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Hey Hun

    I was a working at home GCSE student too, and I was unsure about going college. But I love it! It's alot more relaxed, theres less of the 'miss shes doing such and such!' crap and there is always someone about willing to talk to you. College is such a broad mix of students that theres always someone you'll get along with. Even if you try it and dislike it, it's still worth trying. I was tempted not too, but I'm so glad I did.
    xxx
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Thanks all your experiences are really helping me.

    I do want to go I am just scared of sinking back to old ways should I say.

    Im also worried about not getting the GCSE's I need to do A-Levels.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Thanks guys for all your experiences.

    I would love to do A-Levels, namely Health and Social Care, English Literature, Media Stuides and possibly Film Studies or Theatre Technical Studies. I just dont know if I will get the GCSE's I want.

    If I dont I am going to be left at doing a GNVQ or National Diploma/Certificate Course, most likely Health and Social care or Childcare. Which I dont really want to resort to as A-Levels get me into Uni and as far as I know of anyway, other qualifications dont. Is that right or am i missunderstanding what I have been reading?

    a national diploma would get you into uni, coz thats what i did, i wasnt keen on doin a-levels as art was the only subject i was interested in, therefor i went for a national diploma which is the equivelant to 4 a-levels anyway x
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ok thanks for that! I will go and look through the college prospectusses and see what National Diploma's need in the way of GCSE's. Thank you!!!!!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    don't forget doing a national diploma might hinder what you want to do in the future if you change your mind. say i did one in nursing because i wanted to be a nurse. then i changed my mind..i'd be a bit buggered wouldn't i.
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