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Any "road"

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Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    okie pokie.. we generally call them townies :P lol
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Gazza<3
    okie pokie.. we generally call them townies :P lol

    Townie already means something else though. It's what people from the country (like Bexy :razz: ) call people from the city. Same as pikey already means Gipsy, not ned.

    Seriously, think up your own words :razz:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Kiezo
    It seems only the poor, working class (usually neds) talk stereotypical Glaswegian/Scouse/whatever, yet the Northerners actually seem to be proud of their illiteracy :confused:

    I speak with a northern accent, funnily enough because I am northern. However this in no way makes me illiterate or poor. I’m sure that the same can be said of most accents for example when southerners say "bas" instead of bus but because there southerners they aren’t seen as "poor illiterate working class" they are seen as posh!!!
    Just because I don’t always stick to received pronunciation it does not make me stupid or illiterate or most of all poor (e.g. Cilla Black living in that cardboard box in Liverpool) I happen to be proud of where I come from and cant believe that people judge others class, intelligence and wealth from the way they pronounce a word! I find it all very sad.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i jus think of ned flanders wen eva u mention tht to bexy :P

    i dress like a skater usually, so define a townie for me :eek2:

    wot do u call 'rude boys' where u live kiezo?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You "Northeners" wouldn't know dialect if it smacked you on the arse.

    Aberdonian is where it's at, folks.

    "Fit like iday, ma loon? Fars yer quine the nicht?"

    :thumb:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    And I thought Jersey had horrible accents... :p
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Mel-H
    I speak with a northern accent, funnily enough because I am northern.

    Did I say accent?

    I speak with a Glasgow accent (funnily enough) but I don't run around saying "cannae", "dinnae", "windae", "dae", "whit" etc.
    Just because I don’t always stick to received pronunciation it does not make me stupid or illiterate or most of all poor (e.g. Cilla Black living in that cardboard box in Liverpool)

    Uhh... that's the point, it's only Northerners that seem to do it even if they aren't poor/illiterate.

    Thinking about it, it's not just people from Glasgow/Liverpool/etc., that seem to try and distance themselves from this, people all over the world do. Smart, educated black people don't run about shouting "YO WUD TO THA MUMMY FUCKA!". Educated Americans (LOL!) don't run about shouting "YEEHAW! Boy howdy, Pilgrim!".

    See what I'm getting at?
    I happen to be proud of where I come from

    I've never got it when people say they're proud of where they're from. Fair enough if you're proud of your area for a particular acheivement or whatever, but otherwise it's just like saying you're proud 'cause you have brown hair.
    and cant believe that people judge others class, intelligence and wealth from the way they pronounce a word! I find it all very sad.

    First impressions, innit. You don't picture a Glasgow ned, sporting a fine looking Burberry tracksuit and baseball cap, talking in Glasgow slang as having class, do you? Just as you don't picture intelligent or educated people talking in slang either.
    Originally posted by Gazza<3

    i dress like a skater usually, so define a townie for me :eek2:

    Anyone pictured here.
    wot do u call 'rude boys' where u live kiezo?

    I told you already - neds :razz:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Lil Laura
    I'd far rather have a voice/accent/dialect with character than a bland southern one. ;)

    I'd rather have an accent that people can understand rather than a jumbled mess of noise that makes about a much sense as static.:p
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    A Jock criticising anyone else for sounding illiterate and stupid.

    Oh, the irony.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Kermit
    A Jock criticising anyone else for sounding illiterate and stupid.

    Oh, the irony.

    Did you read any of what I just said?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Kiezo
    It seems only the poor, working class (usually neds) talk stereotypical Glaswegian/Scouse/whatever, yet the Northerners actually seem to be proud of their illiteracy


    It's quite common. Does anyone notice that some Glaswegians hate it when anyone does well for themselves? It's like "As long as we're all daft, it's OK"

    And I don't speak like a "Ned". Sure I'll sometimes slip in a few "common Glaswegian" words but I do speak properly. I hate the accent sometimes though.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Kiezo
    Ned = townie.

    ned = non-educated delinquent.
    the Northerners actually seem to be proud of their illiteracy


    it's not illiteracy, it's dialect. speech has nothing to do with literacy.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I seem to have a mix of accent. Alot of my family are northen and so i've picked up accents from then, like saying "boos" insted of bus, and dubaya instead of double u. its weird.
    Oh and i've pick up words from you lot, like ned and chav, no one round here knows what they are and i'm having to explain myself:(
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Jazza Bing
    It's quite common.

    It's not really. Like I said, most people with a decent education etc. try and distance themselves from talking that way.
    Originally posted by kaffrin
    ned = non-educated delinquent.

    The word was around first, and the acronym was made up later to fit it.
    it's not illiteracy, it's dialect. speech has nothing to do with literacy.

    il·lit·er·a·cy
    n. pl. il·lit·er·a·cies

    An error, as in writing or speech, made by or thought to be characteristic of one who is illiterate.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Kiezo
    il·lit·er·a·cy
    n. pl. il·lit·er·a·cies

    An error, as in writing or speech, made by or thought to be characteristic of one who is illiterate.

    not in the sense you were using it.

    'an illiteracy' or 'several illiteracies' means that.

    if someone is showing their illiteracy, as you stated it (such as a condition), unless they are actually in the act of displaying a single illiteracy (as per the quote) 'showing their illiteracy' means:

    1. The state of being illiterate, or uneducated; specifically, inability to read and write.

    it's best not to use long words unless you understand the context they belong in. ;)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by kaffrin
    ned = non-educated delinquent.

    That is great. I know a guy named Ned and I'm going to call him that.

    [/random shit that deals nothing with this topic]
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by my_name
    That is great. I know a guy named Ned and I'm going to call him that.

    you know a guy called ned and you haven't thought of anything funnier to call him?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by kaffrin
    you know a guy called ned and you haven't thought of anything funnier to call him?

    i'm not creative like that. got any ideas? by the way... what would that name be short for... like the original birth name?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Kiezo
    It's not really. Like I said, most people with a decent education etc. try and distance themselves from talking that way.[/i]

    What part of Glasgow are you from? There seems to be a mix here. Most speak nicely but there are a fair few neds and "common folk" I guess they'd be called who still talk like that. The way in which I meant it's quite common is the dialect. "Ned Speak" is really different. They have their own twang. Around here and at school anyway. Though my school does serve Possil or the "Posso Fleeto" as they like to be called :/
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    it still defeats me how anyone can be 'proud' of where they came from.
    like where they came from ...even love it but ...proud?
    how can you be be proud of which field you were born in ...you did sod all to achieve this feat.
    'my corner of the field is so much better than your corner' ...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by kaffrin

    it's best not to use long words unless you understand the context they belong in. ;)

    Uh, it was perfectly fine the way I used it. OK, technically it wasn't used properly, but neither is a whole load of other shit I come out with; "made of win" etc.

    Geddit?
    Originally posted by Jazza Bing
    What part of Glasgow are you from?

    Just outside, in Bishopbriggs.
    There seems to be a mix here. Most speak nicely but there are a fair few neds and "common folk" I guess they'd be called who still talk like that. The way in which I meant it's quite common is the dialect. "Ned Speak" is really different. They have their own twang.

    They may have their own 'twang', but it's still pretty similar, and most people with any sense tries to distance themselves from it :razz:
    Though my school does serve Possil or the "Posso Fleeto" as they like to be called :/

    Hahaha. Tweet tweet Posso Fleet!

    Man I hate those guys.
    Originally posted by morrocan roll
    it still defeats me how anyone can be 'proud' of where they came from.
    like where they came from ...even love it but ...proud?
    how can you be be proud of which field you were born in ...you did sod all to achieve this feat.
    'my corner of the field is so much better than your corner' ...

    I wish more people understood this :razz:
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