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Subway and big brand shops

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  • JsTJsT Posts: 18,268 Skive's The Limit
    briggi wrote: »
    The thing is, I see your point. To run with this point means getting into the huge issue of the fact that we live in a culture where the mantra seems to be "can't wait, must eat".

    I dont really have a choice. I leave home at 8.30 in the morning and don't get back till gone 9.30pm. Bit hard to go without eating :p

    I could take sarnies but I frankly - cant be arsed. So if I want to eat I have to walk past the closed sandwich shops to the McDonalds/Subway etc.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    briggi wrote: »
    if I haven't fucked off to the deepest, darkest countryside first of course -- at Calvin's suggestion ;)


    lol, it just seems to be a better idea. Cities are all about conglomorates. Cities are made for Starbucks, McDonald's etc its the way things are.

    Its ultimately down to the consumer, and enough of us still want to buy a hamburger from McD or a sandwhich from Subway.

    I have heard the countryside is nice though. However it's a fucker to get a tall skinny latte though after 8pm :D
  • SkiveSkive Posts: 15,283 Skive's The Limit
    It's the people like Kermit, Briggi, and me to a certain extent that is the reason those places will always still exist.

    Nah, just down to hungry people.

    Saying you like Subway doesn't mean you wont eat from anywhere else. :)
    Weekender Offender 
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I love subway in an unnatural way. Im an absolute sucker for a cheese steak sub.

    But saying that, the best sandwhiches on earth? A wee small butty shop in my village back home. (its a legitimate village mind, handful of shops, couple of pubs, only accesible through country side on every side etc) ....but goddamn if those cheese salad baguettes arent tasty as fuck and only £1.90 a go....
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    surely what i quoted you as saying earlier equates to you liking them..

    I think Fred West was nicer than Adolf Hitler, but it doesn't mean I like Freddie...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Bit OT but what do you think of a conglomerate like Blockbuster Kermit?

    On one hand, they are putting all the little video shops we used to have out of business, etc etc

    But on the other hand, when we did have those crappy little video shops the film you wanted was rarely in, wasn't much selection whereas in Blockbuster you can get whatever film you want basically and it will nearly always be in - and they are open for longer on more days......

    So what say you?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I don't really tend to be a big fan of most conglomerates, but with some things they are completely unavoidable. When I lived in Durham there was an excellent independent video place with good opening hours which we used, but the nearest video shop to us now is a Blockbusters franchise in a Tesco supermarket. So I use the internet for video rental.

    The supermarkets are unavoidable for a lot of shopping, and much as I dislike them, there's no way around it. I get my meat, fish and veg from the local market, though, which is much cheaper and much better quality. It's quite hard to avoid big chain places for clothes, too.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    That's fair enough, I just think it's easy to slate conglomerates when it comes to food as it is obviously processed crap. But when it becomes a day to day item like a video rental or washing up liquid, people don't seem to be so enthused.

    Even though to same amount of local businesses are getting put under strain/closed down.

    Take Tesco, they do what you say and basically open so many stores that nothing else can stay open.. but you could still buy most of the stuff you need from your local grocer or newsagents... but at a higher cost to you..?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think for many things going to a supermarket is unavoidable now- my local store doesn't stock anywhere near enough things to be viable for a week's shopping. It's fine for things like newspapers and chocolate and the odd pint of milk or emergency loaf of bread, but they don't sell a lot of things I need. I tend to get emergency bread and milk from Tesco now, though, through pure laziness- Tesco have opened a shop on the floor below where I work.

    If I'm at home I'll get bread and milk from the corner shop, and I do get my meat from the butcher's in the market, and I often get fruit and veg from the market too, so it is swings and roundabouts.

    On the subway thing, I can understand why people use them when nothing else is open (like in the late evenings and at the weekend), and I can understand why the familiar brand is reassuring in a town you don't know, but I don't think that automatically preferring the corporate chain to the independent places creates good and welcoming towns and cities.

    I have the same attitude towards "exclusive" chains like ask and Pizza Express, too, so it isn't about food snobbery.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Taste is subjective taste of course, but I fail to see how you can be subjective on something that has little-to-no taste at all. Similarly, subjective taste falls down when you try to find someone who enjoys the taste of Domestos. I suspect eating a Subway's sandwich closely resembles what eating microwaved cardboard would be like.

    I'm completely in agreement with Kermit here: Brand placement plays a large part in why people shop at Subway and other sub-standard purveyors of mediocre food. Anyone who has read Fast Food Nation can tell you the extent to which these companies go in order ingrain themselves in your psyche. I also think that a large part of the appeal with Subway is kidding yourself that you're eating healthy fast-food. You're not. At best you're eating something which has absolutely no nutritional value whatsoever.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    At best you're eating something which has absolutely no nutritional value whatsoever.



    I'm not saying anybody is right or wrong to like/dislike subway but how can you make that claim?

    http://www.subway.co.uk/menu_nutrition_info.asp

    Take the beef 6inch sub for example, 3.9g of fat, 235 Cals, then you have 21g of protein (the RDI being approx 55g for the average male) then theres a reasonable range of salad you can take your pick from, all of which has been fresh from any of the subways i have been to, i won't claim their tomatoes are juicier than the local shops etc... but they certainly aren't plastic or rotting!

    Remember it's a sandwich not a banquet, a £2 sandwich if your like me and only go when they have something you fancy as sub of the day!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    One day we will be living in tesco land.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    minimi38 wrote: »
    One day we will be living in tesco land.

    :yippe: Tesco Local are good, nice and easy to pick up things on the way home!

    Bring it on

    :D
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    thumbnail_20060302-enjoy-capitalism.jpg
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Im sorry to hear about Capitalism taking over.

    I bought you a card to cheer you up :D
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I hope it is made from recycled card.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    YES, it is actually. I think is made from 100% recycleable material

    :thumb:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I bet the card from the small local shop has more taste and nutritional value.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote: »
    I think Fred West was nicer than Adolf Hitler, but it doesn't mean I like Freddie...

    you can't compare saying you like a deli wrap to liking a mass murderer!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    .
  • SkiveSkive Posts: 15,283 Skive's The Limit
    Taste is subjective taste of course, but I fail to see how you can be subjective on something that has little-to-no taste at all.

    Well many people think it's does have 'taste', hence taste being subjective. It's not rocket science.
    Weekender Offender 
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    you can't compare saying you like a deli wrap to liking a mass murderer!

    :confused:

    It's a simple enough point I'm making.I don't like fast food, but if you hold a gun to my head and force me to choose a fast food sandwich, I would choose a McDonald's wrap over a Subway bland. But that's like saying I'd rather eat babies for tea.

    Mr Orange, its amazing how you can twist things though. The "healthiest" sandwich on that list has nearly three grammes of salt in it- that's half my daily amount in a sandwich that only weighs 200g.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    you can't compare saying you like a deli wrap to liking a mass murderer!

    :lol:

    EDIT: Just to add my two-pennys worth....

    Like people have said, it is all about convienience with fast food, and obviously if you like them or not. I personally quite enjoy Subway sandwiches - but then, I very VERY rarely go to our local Subway, and I'm really fussy about what they put on there - I definetly don't chose anything on their menu. I also enjoy a McDonalds/KFC etc, but again, rarely.

    The local sandwich shops in our area are lovely, and I do eat at them two or three times a week - but I'd put money on the fact that I'd save much more money, or at least get more for my money in a fast food place. I can spend anything up to £5 for a small sandwich and a bottle of juice/water... yet my usual order from Subway (which is a much bigger sandwich) comes to around £3, plus my drink? £3.75-£4.

    Not a huge difference but if I ate at Subway instead of the local shops, I'd have £3-£4 savings a week, thats £12-£16 a month and £144+ (not working out 16x12 with a headache, not very good at maths to start with) a year... quite a bit overall. But like I said, I still eat at the local shops because it is pretty much as close as the rest, so my little rant is pointless :D
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote: »
    :confused:

    Mr Orange, its amazing how you can twist things though. The "healthiest" sandwich on that list has nearly three grammes of salt in it- that's half my daily amount in a sandwich that only weighs 200g.

    And a pack of Walkers Salt & Vinegar crisps has 0.8g (approx 13% RDA) and that's just in a snack.

    An average slice of bread contains approx 0.5g of salt, thick sliced can be almost 1g


    I'm sure there are hundreds of other examples of foods that we regularly snack on that are high in salt, most of which won't be offering you anything towards your 5 a day!

    Also how can you prove that the local made baguette you're happily buying isn't higher in salt?
    Most local bakeries are unmonitored in their salt, fat levels etc... Just because they taste nicer, or fresher doesn't make them healthier.

    Don't get me wrong, I don't work for any of these chains, I don't go to them daily, in fact i visit a fast food chain perhaps once every 2 to 4 weeks. (Although i am a bit of a sucker for the local chinese take away, that must worse than any of these regarding salt/fat levels!)

    I also appreciate your point about how Mcd's, Subway, Tesco etc... are just making our towns the same as the next and don't offer anything special. (which is saddening, and i have in the past walked a few minutes further, paid a few pence extra and shopped at the local greengrocers, but some times it's more trouble than it's worth. My last visit was to get ingredient to make a curry, i asked if he had any chillis, he said no, try Bobs down Leicester Road, about a 15 minute walk each way! not ideal on your lunch break! - this happened with a few more of the ingredients i was after too, in the end i just popped to Morrisons!)

    But my arguement was more against them providing nothing with any nutritional value, perhaps they aren't the healthiest option, but to someone with a couple of quid, in a rush it's a lot better than popping in the local shop for a sausage roll and a couple of packs of crisps!

    Each time i've been to Subway i've been satsified with my £2 sub of the day, guess i'm either misguided or one of the lucky ones that didn't get the display only plastic tomatoes on their sub!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    £5 for a sandwich and bottle of water? Where are these places? It comes in at about £2.50 for a sandwich, crisps and can of pop at the places I go to, and funnily enough, the queue's out the door every lunchtime.

    The health value of a sandwich is largely irrelevant, although processed food is always worse than unprocessed, its everything to do with the Subway experience that gets my back up.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I went to a cafe in Oxford and the sandwiches were £10. No lie. Obviously, I left.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Every 'local' sandwich shop I've been to that charges very little for their sandwiches has been grubby and run by eejits. There is a lovely sandwich shop near where we live but the prices are just the same as the local Subway.

    I agree with those who are saying that large multinational companies do erode the individuality of our town centres, but if you lived in my town you would welcome that! I'd much rather eat a Subway sandwich than one prepared by the people who work in my local shopping centre (surely even Kermit would agree, since he has visited my local town centre with me in the past?)

    Having said that, I don't buy sandwiches. I'd rather make my own. If I eat out it's a meal or nothing.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote: »

    The health value of a sandwich is largely irrelevant, although processed food is always worse than unprocessed, its everything to do with the Subway experience that gets my back up.

    What did you have to endure when you went to Subway?

    I just walk in, wait a moment for my turn, then say what it is i want, along with what sort of bread i would like it on.

    He takes my chosen bread out of the oven, cuts it in half, then puts on the meat i requested, then asked what salad i would like, i say pretty much all of them and he works his way down the line placing a reasonable amount of each on my sandwich, tops if off with some sauce if requested, charges me £2 and im on my way.

    In my local shop i can pop in, wait my turn ask for the cob i like, which she then gets out the display counter, all pre-wrapped, sat there since the morning and charges me £1.50 / £1.80 for something half the size with minimum toppings!

    In fact most of the local shops are like this, i've only been to two places one a bakery where it was fresh but nothing special, and one a cob shop near my college which was very tasty for around the same price as Subway.

    I'm not sure what people expect, i go to these places to get something to eat not embark upon some remarkable daily experience.

    My only issue with these companies is how they are in every high street, each town seem to work to a generic plan. It is a shame, but i'm sure 50 years ago people were complaining about similar things, how shops were going to destroy the local market or whatever.
    But it's not just Subway, Mcd's etc... it's pretty much all of them, Greggs, Argos, Blockbusters, Woolworths, Next, Topshop.

    If we are to protest against all these high street giants that have ripped the soul out of our town centres then lifes going to be rather difficult.

    I'm hungry - i could go to another local shop for a sandwich instead of subway, spend 50p extra, walk 5 minutes further, do my bit for the little man.

    I need a new table - forget Ikea, i'll pop to the local furnature shop, drive an extra mile or two, pay an extra £10 / £20 or so, (excluding the parking ticket, unless im intending to walk half a mile carrying a table through a busy high street to the extortionate car park) - to support the little man

    I need some new Jeans - Instead of Topman for some reasonable ones, or Asda for some cheap, cheerful ones, I'll go through the stress of braving the manic market to look for some, pay around the same for some which will no doubt be faded white within a dozen washes and have holes in my pockets! - to prop up the little man


    We shouldn't be blackmailed with guilt into paying more, or receiving less just to prop up a small business. If they are truely competitive they will survive. If they are cheaper or better they will survive.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Mr Orange wrote: »
    I'm not sure what people expect, i go to these places to get something to eat not embark upon some remarkable daily experience.

    My only issue with these companies is how they are in every high street, each town seem to work to a generic plan. It is a shame, but i'm sure 50 years ago people were complaining about similar things, how shops were going to destroy the local market or whatever.
    But it's not just Subway, Mcd's etc... it's pretty much all of them, Greggs, Argos, Blockbusters, Woolworths, Next, Topshop.

    If we are to protest against all these high street giants that have ripped the soul out of our town centres then lifes going to be rather difficult.

    I'm hungry - i could go to another local shop for a sandwich instead of subway, spend 50p extra, walk 5 minutes further, do my bit for the little man.

    I need a new table - forget Ikea, i'll pop to the local furnature shop, drive an extra mile or two, pay an extra £10 / £20 or so, (excluding the parking ticket, unless im intending to walk half a mile carrying a table through a busy high street to the extortionate car park) - to support the little man

    I need some new Jeans - Instead of Topman for some reasonable ones, or Asda for some cheap, cheerful ones, I'll go through the stress of braving the manic market to look for some, pay around the same for some which will no doubt be faded white within a dozen washes and have holes in my pockets! - to prop up the little man


    We shouldn't be blackmailed with guilt into paying more, or receiving less just to prop up a small business. If they are truely competitive they will survive. If they are cheaper or better they will survive.

    here here
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    here here

    Yep, I agreed with all of that :yes:
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