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Mixing of Meats in Food

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
I don't eat pork so whenever I buy certain prepackaged foods I need to flip them over and see what else went into the food and I've noticed how often so many meat groups are mixed together.

Like I got I think a chicken dish and it had in it both beef and pork fat.

Now if you're Muslim or Jewish you can't eat the pork and if you're a Hindu you can't eat the beef.

Also a lot of things like yoghurt's and desserts may contain gelatin which half the time don't say if it's pork or beef gelatin.

Anyone else have to read labels carefully? or think it's strange what you think should be a vegetarian dish and isn't?

I find Asda's own brand don't tend to mix different meats as much as Tesco's and I find Asda's labellings much more precise.

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I just think its horrible - I mean I've been veggie for 12 years anyway but I don't see why they need to put pork and beef fat in a chicken dish, really does make you wonder about how much crap is in these things.

    Also don't know why they use animal by products in a lot of desserts/chocolates that don't need to have them in - I swear I read somewhere that for example if a Mars bar has a U at the end of the expiry date then that means it was manufactured in the UK and that the whey in it is ok for veggies, whereas ones that are manufactured in Europe use animal by-products so aren't. They don't exactly make things easy for us or indeed for people who don't eat certain types of meat for religious reasons.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The Co-op is very good at labelling on it's own products. I noticed on the their products that have rennet/gelatine in it specifically says cows/calfs/pork.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    For the record, if a Jew believes a food is Kosher then it is, even if it's technically not.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I personally try and mix as many types of meats as possible into each meal.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I don't eat pork so whenever I buy certain prepackaged foods I need to flip them over and see what else went into the food and I've noticed how often so many meat groups are mixed together.

    Like I got I think a chicken dish and it had in it both beef and pork fat.

    Now if you're Muslim or Jewish you can't eat the pork and if you're a Hindu you can't eat the beef.

    Also a lot of things like yoghurt's and desserts may contain gelatin which half the time don't say if it's pork or beef gelatin.

    Anyone else have to read labels carefully? or think it's strange what you think should be a vegetarian dish and isn't?

    I find Asda's own brand don't tend to mix different meats as much as Tesco's and I find Asda's labellings much more precise.

    I'm vegetarian, but also try to avoid palm oil when I shop so I always spend ages looking at labels.

    To be honest, I think that people should learn to cook from fresh rather than eat ready made shit in a bag. They're going to be full of crap.

    As far as gelatine, rennet, cochneal ect are concerned (from a vegetarian standpoint) you tend to know what you are looking at and what they are likely to be in... For example, dishes with cheese in may have animal fats in, mousse might have gelatine.

    I agree that they should state whether it is pork or beef gelatine. maybe you should write to them.

    I don't see why companies need to use gelatine when they can use pectin... And gelatine or isinglass in beers and wines... Why???
  • JadedJaded back for more Posts: 2,682
    I know what you mean about gelatine MoonRat, but in some ways it is better to not let that part of the animal go to waste when they slaughter it for its meat, so from a recycling standpoint it is good practice. From a veggie one however, I'm still fucked off I can't eat marshmellow any more, its been so long I can't remember what it tastes like anymore....
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I know I'm stirring here, but I've found that things are far better labelled than they used to be. Companies will use the best thing for the job, gelatin will be the most effective (that includes cost effective) product for what they're making.

    I tend to find life's a doddle for veggies, there's that nice v on pretty much everything. If you're picky about what you eat then you'll need to check carefully.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    LadyJade wrote:
    I'm still fucked off I can't eat marshmellow any more, its been so long I can't remember what it tastes like anymore....
    You can eat Ben and Jerry's 'Phish Food' ice cream though as it contains gelatine-free marshmellows (I believe). Also you used to be able to buy marshmellow spread that was free from gelatin but I've not seen it for ages.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I know I'm stirring here, but I've found that things are far better labelled than they used to be.

    Indeed. Why on packets of peanuts, does it say 'warning: contains nuts'?:confused:

    I have to read labels carefully, although for me now it is pretty much common sense. (as in, I know that most butters will contain milk, as will most yoghurts)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sofie wrote:
    Indeed. Why on packets of peanuts, does it say 'warning: contains nuts'?:confused:

    I wouldn't be at all surprised, if 'contains nuts' wasn't on the packet, some prat would sue the makers for not making this clear :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I know I'm stirring here, but I've found that things are far better labelled than they used to be. Companies will use the best thing for the job, gelatin will be the most effective (that includes cost effective) product for what they're making.

    I tend to find life's a doddle for veggies, there's that nice v on pretty much everything. If you're picky about what you eat then you'll need to check carefully.


    Well in some ways it's easier to be Veggie and do shopping then be someone that doesn't eat certain meats ... but do others.

    I also look for that "V" sign and if I do then I know I can stop there and just buy that item but otherwise it's like ok check for gelatin, lard, etc.

    I also find the stores that are bringing in food from abroad like LIDL far better at providing food that is free from a range of addon's like gelatin, etc.

    What do people think of Frankenstein Food like when thy take a gene from a fish and put it into a tomato to make it stay fresher for longer?
  • Saeed MSaeed M ********* Posts: 270 Boards Initiate
    I know what you mean. I end up scrutinising all ingredients, not only to avoid animal ingredients, but alcohol too. The V sign has made things a little easier though.
  • JadedJaded back for more Posts: 2,682
    Ooh, cheers Randomgirl, not like I need any encouragement to eat Ben & Jerry's :)
    And Diamond Geezer, I don't think you can do things like that without paying for it at some point. They are trying to fix problems caused in the first place by unsustainable farming practices and over use of pesticedes, so messing with the genetic composition of food seems like the least logical action to take, besides which there is no evidence to indicate it is safe in the long term.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Chicken and anchovies :sour:

    Tuna and bacon:yum:
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