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Irish Names

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Im reading a book just now and the main character is called Saoirse, after pronouncing it about 10 different ways in my head I googled it and got 3 results!

So Irish folk, is it Seer-cha, Sor-cha or See-chias?
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Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Seer-sha i think.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Obviously it's sah-or-uh-see

    :razz: I get on well with Irish people.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It's seer-sha and means freedom. Nice wee name but mine's obviously better. ;)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yerascrote wrote:
    It's seer-sha and means freedom. Nice wee name but mine's obviously better. ;)

    What does your name mean?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sofie wrote:
    What does your name mean?
    It means something like "dry lake"
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    lea_uk wrote:
    It means something like "dry lake"

    A Turlough is a dry lake. Coming from the Irish words Tirim=dry and lough=lake. The name itslef means Instigator.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yerascrote wrote:
    A Turlough is a dry lake. Coming from the Irish words Tirim=dry and lough=lake. The name itslef means Instigator.
    why have you changed your name?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Mad Mac wrote:
    why have you changed your name?

    Don't want more people knowing my name on the net.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Whenever I read your name "Yerascrote" I think about "You're a scrotum"

    I dunno :no: . I am infamous for bad associations tho.
  • littlemissylittlemissy knit chick Posts: 9,972
    StrubbleS wrote:
    Whenever I read your name "Yerascrote" I think about "You're a scrotum"

    I dunno :no: . I am infamous for bad associations tho.


    I think that is what you are meant to think.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think that is what you are meant to think.

    oh, i thought there was some nifty irish meaning behind it.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yerascrote wrote:
    It's seer-sha and means freedom. Nice wee name but mine's obviously better. ;)
    Thank you dry lake :thumb:

    :p
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It's a local colloquial way of saying it.

    jesus christ. I just dictionary'd scrote and that's true.

    I thought you peeps were fucking with me...

    jesus christ, now I need a pint o' Blonde...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Didn't look at the first page but some nice boys names are Dermot, Finnian and Colm.
  • Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Warming up? Posts: 16,688
    Yerascrote wrote:
    A Turlough is a dry lake. Coming from the Irish words Tirim=dry and lough=lake. The name itslef means Instigator.
    So the same word that means "dry lake" also means "instigator"? :confused:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    So the same word that means "dry lake" also means "instigator"? :confused:

    Nope.

    The name Turlough is a modern form of the Old Irish name Toirdhealbhach, the verb toirdhealbh means to instigate.
  • Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Warming up? Posts: 16,688
    Ahh. Now I got it. Hehe, interesting that it would change in a way that it's the same as two other words together...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Fintan is an Irish boys name too.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Loads of Irish names are so beautiful, but I'd probably avoid giving my child one as most of the world are idiots and I know how it feels to constantly have your name spelled wrong. Which is a shame.

    Obvious solution is to kill all the idiots.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The way turlough prounced it is the way it's spoke.

    My friend had a baby girl not so long ago and she named her saoirse...nice wee republician name she said.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    My mums irish god son is called Finbar Josha Joseph. He got comfirmed this year and added John Paul as his conformation name, plus a double-barreled surname, poor kid.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I really like Irish names, especially for girls, and I don't really care about the idiots.

    Plus I've got a very Irish surname, and genuine Gaelic ancestry, so it won't look dumb.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Do Irish people have a different language or something?!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm going to start calling you Paddy :yes:

    ETA not you Lacymay, I meant Kermit!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    LacyMay wrote:
    Do Irish people have a different language or something?!

    Yes, its called Gaelic.

    Also spoken in Highland Scotland, Wales, Cornwall and Brittany.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    People in Brittany speak Breton. Or however you spell it. Just being picky, like.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    Yes, its called Gaelic.

    Also spoken in Highland Scotland, Wales, Cornwall and Brittany.

    Aah so are those names in Gaelic? Or are they in English but just prounounced funny?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    A bit of both now because Gaelic is just about dead as a language.

    The spelling is Gaelic, but fit into the English alphabet. That's why the spelling is often so far away from the pronunciation (for instance Niamh is pronounced Neave).
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    LacyMay wrote:
    Aah so are those names in Gaelic? Or are they in English but just prounounced funny?

    Well all Gaelic names are similar.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    A bit of both now because Gaelic is just about dead as a language.

    Not really, as a language which has native speakers it's dying but there are loads of people who are learning it, including myself. I'm fluent and it's a beautiful language, Irish Gaelic is different than other Gaelic languages but you can see the links like.
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