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Hospitals don't meet highest standards of cleanliness

Story.

I'm not sure what I'm more surprised about- that the (neutral and unbiased) BBC reported this story as hospitals "failing" the inpsections, or that it turns out that Mental Health hospitals are filthy grime-ridden cess-pits.

Interestingly, the survey found no difference between hospitals cleaned "in house", and those cleaned by private companies.

The mental health hospitals don't get any funding, so its no wonder they are so disgusting. But what is the excuse for the other "failing" hospitals, and what is the excuse for the hospitals that aren't meeting the top standard?
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Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I would like to know which hospitals were evaluated and their respective scores too.
  • BunnieBunnie TheSite's sweetie pie Posts: 6,099
    how come mental health hospitals dont get any funding?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    No benefit in mental health provisions, mental health trusts are always at the bottom of the pile for funding.

    There are too many grannies moaning about their hips to spare a thought for the suicidal young man.
  • BunnieBunnie TheSite's sweetie pie Posts: 6,099
    but what about all the people that they send to them instead of prison? thats wrong! why is it not split equally?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I agree that hospitals should be cleaner in all areas.

    I also agree that mental health departments are completely underfunded and that they are right at the bottom of funding priorities.
    "It's just as important for people who have severe mental health problems to have a clean and comfortable environment as it is with somebody who is going to have open heart surgery."

    But seriously though if I had to pick one patient to go into a clean environment and one to go into a dirty one I know which one I'd chose.

    Edited to correct spelling
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Bunny_0_ wrote:
    but what about all the people that they send to them instead of prison?
    I don't think this amounts to a serious percentage of mental health patients.

    But prove me wrong if you can find a source
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Randomgirl wrote:

    But seriously though if I had to pick one patient to go into a clean environment and one to go into a dirty one I know which one I'd chose.
    :no: Why should there have to be this compromise?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    vikki1825 wrote:
    :no: Why should there have to be this compromise?
    Psychiatric patients rarely have open wounds, nor are they usually physically examined by their doctors and nurses on ward rounds.

    You make a fair point that there should be the same standards of cleanliness throughout the NHS, but this story is nothing exciting. It would be interesting to investigate or analyse further and find out whether the dirtiest mental health wards were located within ordinary hospitals or were separate units, and therefore whether the cleaning methods and frequency are different.

    Every psych ward I've ever been to has been unpleasant and unwelcoming. That should be the focus of their attention, rather than whether the place is spotless. The wards become home to the long stay patients and the average home is hardly a beacon of light in terms of cleanliness. So let's keep it in perspective.
  • BunnieBunnie TheSite's sweetie pie Posts: 6,099
    Randomgirl wrote:
    I don't think this amounts to a serious percentage of mental health patients.

    But prove me wrong if you can find a source

    no i spose when u actually think about it, it makes sense! sorry just being dippy!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    No benefit in mental health provisions, mental health trusts are always at the bottom of the pile for funding. There are too many grannies moaning about their hips to spare a thought for the suicidal young man.
    Well, partly that, and partly to do with the fact grannies moaning about hips are also more likely to vote than suicidal young men. Or young men in general, come to think of it. They say politics isn't involved in the healthcare system. Bollocks, absolute bollocks.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    The mental health hospitals don't get any funding

    Not quite true. Certainly they don’t get the same proportion of funding as acute hospitals.

    It’s worth noting that neither do GPs or Community services.
    No benefit in mental health provisions, mental health trusts are always at the bottom of the pile for funding.

    I can’t argue with that. It’s actually a reflection of the target culture and there are very few attached to Mental Health directly. PCTs are tending to look more at funding services in GP practices, for MH patients, than in hospitals too.
    There are too many grannies moaning about their hips to spare a thought for the suicidal young man.

    Or women asking for Herceptin…
    vikki1825 wrote:
    Why should there have to be this compromise?

    Generally there shouldn’t. To be honest funding for cleaning services is not provided directly by the PCT and it’s the Trusts themselves who decide how much to spend on this aspect of their patient’s care.

    However, the standards applied to each are, and should be, different. This is more about the need to watch for infection control where there are open wound. MRSA is more an issue on an Orthopaedic ward than on a stroke ward for example.

    I would much rather that the Trust concentrated their cleaning efforts accordingly. Although cross infection should not be ignored.
    stargalaxy wrote:
    Well, partly that, and partly to do with the fact grannies moaning about hips are also more likely to vote than suicidal young men.

    Nah, it’s not that cynical. Treatment regimes are different as are outcomes. It’s easier to justify £10,000 spent on the granny because you will fix her hip. £10,000 on the suicidal young man may not make any difference – for example. It’s not really that simple either though, I just haven’t got the time to explain it fully.
    They say politics isn't involved in the healthcare system. Bollocks, absolute bollocks.

    I don’t know who says that. It's everywhere. Nationally, locally and even within NHS organisations...
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