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scottish unis

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
edited March 27 in Work & Study
i was told that you dont have to pay to go to a scottish university and thats its based entirely on brains. is that true?
Post edited by JustV on

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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    If you are an English student, and want to study in Scotland then you would pay. If you're a Scottish student and want to study in Scotland then your fees would get paid and then you would pay them back after uni as part of your loan payments.

    If you're from the EU, then it's probably free.


    Oh well.
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    littlemissylittlemissy Posts: 9,972 Supreme Poster
    its based entirely on brains. is that true?

    Um, isn't that the case with all universities?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i was told that you dont have to pay to go to a scottish university and thats its based entirely on brains. is that true?
    That question shows a worrying lack of understanding of how the tuition fee system works.

    You are accepted for university places on grounds of ability, "brains" if you will.

    If you are a student from England and Wales, then you are liable for up to the first £1150pa of tuition fees. This is regardless of the university you apply to. For an arts degree the actual costs is somewhere in the region of £9000pa, and for a science degree it is more like £15,000pa. Scottish students studying in Scotland pay tuition fees after they graduate, not before, but they still have to pay something towards their education.

    In 2006 the system changes: you will be liable for up to the first £3000pa of tuition fees, dependent on how much the university you apply to asks for, but these will be charged after you graduate, and students from low-income families will not have to pay as much as £3000pa. Universities that aren't filling their courses may end up charging less than £3000pa, but this does not mean that entrance to university remains anything other than entirely dependent on intelligence.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Mist wrote:
    If you are an English student, and want to study in Scotland then you would pay. If you're a Scottish student and want to study in Scotland then your fees would get paid and then you would pay them back after uni as part of your loan payments.

    If you're from the EU, then it's probably free.


    Oh well.
    As far as I was aware tutition fees do not have to be paid back, if it's your undergraduate, if you're a scottish student studying in scotland--saas cover it. However, if you take out a loan for living expenses then that would have to be repaid when you graduate and are earning over a certain amount. I'm not sure what the actual amount is...
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    madraykin wrote:
    As far as I was aware tutition fees do not have to be paid back, if it's your undergraduate, if you're a scottish student studying in scotland--saas cover it. However, if you take out a loan for living expenses then that would have to be repaid when you graduate and are earning over a certain amount. I'm not sure what the actual amount is...

    According to my careers advisor this is true.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kermit wrote:
    That question shows a worrying lack of understanding of how the tuition fee system works.

    You are accepted for university places on grounds of ability, "brains" if you will.

    If you are a student from England and Wales, then you are liable for up to the first £1150pa of tuition fees. This is regardless of the university you apply to. For an arts degree the actual costs is somewhere in the region of £9000pa, and for a science degree it is more like £15,000pa. Scottish students studying in Scotland pay tuition fees after they graduate, not before, but they still have to pay something towards their education.

    In 2006 the system changes: you will be liable for up to the first £3000pa of tuition fees, dependent on how much the university you apply to asks for, but these will be charged after you graduate, and students from low-income families will not have to pay as much as £3000pa. Universities that aren't filling their courses may end up charging less than £3000pa, but this does not mean that entrance to university remains anything other than entirely dependent on intelligence.

    Scottish students don't pay tuiton fees at all - they were abolished.

    Student loans are paid back after uni, once you reach a certain level of wage.

    A worry lack of knowledge indeed :thumb: .
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    littlemissylittlemissy Posts: 9,972 Supreme Poster
    Spliffie wrote:
    Scottish students don't pay tuiton fees at all - they were abolished.

    Student loans are paid back after uni, once you reach a certain level of wage.

    A worry lack of knowledge indeed :thumb: .

    Sort of.

    Although they wouldn't need to "pay tuition fees" they would have to pay a graduation fee of £2000. So, in essence, it is still paying for fees.

    Here is a linky to the story: clicky

    It would work, as was said, once the student starts earning over £10,000 and be paid back like the student loan is to be paid back.
    Graduates will be liable to pay a fixed amount (endowment) at the end of their course in recognition of the benefits that they gain from their degree. For entrants in 2001-02, the endowment will be £2,000 and for all new liable students in 2002-03 this amount will be increased by the rate of inflation. The funds raised will be used to provide student support, including bursaries, for future generations of disadvantaged students.

    Which is a way of saying "fees" without using the word fees and therefore giving the impression they were abolished.

    Taken from the official scottish website.

    This is different to how it was pre-2000 when you paid fees and didn't have to pay this "graduation" tax. It means that you don't pay as much to the institution. However, previously it was means tested which meant that there were a certain amount who were exempt from paying fees. This new system is not.

    Anyway, this isn't the issue for the original poster as she is from Tamworth, so would still have to pay tuition fees like normal.
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