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Ireland is Atlantis

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
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6:12pm (UK)
Atlantis Is Ireland - Book

By Senan Hogan, PA News


The mythical underwater empire of Atlantis is actually the island of Ireland, according to a new book.

Swedish geologist Ulf Erlingsson, who is due to visit Ireland next week, makes the claim in a book to be published next month.

Greek philosopher Plato claimed Atlantis was an island in the Atlantic Ocean 11,500 years ago but it sank after being hit by a giant flood-wave.

The myth also sparked a TV series, The Man from Atlantis starring Patrick Duffy, in the late 1970s.

But Professor Erlingsson claims in his book, Atlantis From a Geographer’s Perspective: Mapping the Fairy Land, that Plato’s description of Atlantis matches Ireland perfectly.

The academic said: “Just like Atlantis, Ireland is 300 miles long, 200 miles wide, and widest over the middle.

“They both feature a central plain that is open to the sea, but fringed by mountains. No other island on earth even comes close to this description.

“I am amazed no one has come up with this before, it’s incredible,” he added.

The book also claims that the capital of Atlantis is Tara, the legendary seat of the high king of Ireland in Co Meath.

The temples of Atlantis also correspond with the passage tombs of Newgrange and Knowth, the book suggests.

Prof Erlingsson, who has a PhD in Physical Geography from Uppsala University in Sweden, specialises in geological processes, underwater research and natural disasters.

He claims the island Plato said had sunk was Dogger Bank in the North Sea which was struck by a disastrous flood-wave around 6,100 BC.

Controversy has raged for decades whether Atlantis actually existed. Previous theories suggested it may have been around the Azores islands or in the Aegean Sea.

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    Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Posts: 16,688 Skive's The Limit
    I don't know... according to Plato again, the people of Atlantis had at some time been at war with the people of Athens. Ireland is kinda far for the time when that happened.
    But then again, they say that a major disaster happened some time after that and destroyed much of the existing civilization, so they could have been as advanced as us now, or more.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    also if u look at a good map of ireland it looks like a koala looking over its shoulder
    http://www.irishpenpals.com/iisgames/ireland.gif
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by evil_dave
    also if u look at a good map of ireland it looks like a koala looking over its shoulder
    http://www.irishpenpals.com/iisgames/ireland.gif

    :lol: so true
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Maybe thats what Leprechauns are?
    Atlanteans!
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Hrm Plato... Interesting idea.

    I think there were some Anglo Saxon texts thought to be linked to Atlantis? Where claims were made of trade.


    Anyway, something I thought up earlier this week (similar conversation with a friend... oddly enough)... anybody here similar to Celtic legend? There were 'gods' or heavenly beings that hailed from the 'Otherworld'... now what if these myths/legends had some basis of truth... that the 'Otherworld' may have been Atlantis and these 'Gods' may have been natives of Atlantis.

    I mean think about it... you go back two hundred years with everything in your bag, you'd be seen as something special. :)
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    Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Posts: 16,688 Skive's The Limit
    Originally posted by MoonRat
    Anyway, something I thought up earlier this week (similar conversation with a friend... oddly enough)... anybody here similar to Celtic legend? There were 'gods' or heavenly beings that hailed from the 'Otherworld'... now what if these myths/legends had some basis of truth... that the 'Otherworld' may have been Atlantis and these 'Gods' may have been natives of Atlantis.
    This is a quite popular theory, and with some evidence to support it. The "gods" came from somewhere then left, and also (I'm not 100% sure about this one) the most ancient texts refer to "beings" like Zeus and others as "kings". Only newer texts call them "gods".
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Zalbor
    I don't know... according to Plato again, the people of Atlantis had at some time been at war with the people of Athens. Ireland is kinda far for the time when that happened.
    But then again, they say that a major disaster happened some time after that and destroyed much of the existing civilization, so they could have been as advanced as us now, or more.

    they say it was in the Atlantic though so its going to be far anyway
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    Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Posts: 16,688 Skive's The Limit
    Originally posted by Renzokuken
    they say it was in the Atlantic though so its going to be far anyway
    I'm not sure it was Plato who said it was in the atlantic... Maybe I'll check, not now though.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Zalbor
    I'm not sure it was Plato who said it was in the atlantic... Maybe I'll check, not now though.

    those Atlanteeans obvious flew over in their flying saucers and what not :p
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    Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Posts: 16,688 Skive's The Limit
    Originally posted by Renzokuken
    those Atlanteeans obvious flew over in their flying saucers and what not :p
    Who knows? Anything could be true...
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Zalbor
    Who knows? Anything could be true...

    hm Ireland being technologically advanced. Anyone seen the Family Guy where they show Ireland before the discovery of alcohol? It was like the Jetsons :p
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by evil_dave
    also if u look at a good map of ireland it looks like a koala looking over its shoulder
    http://www.irishpenpals.com/iisgames/ireland.gif

    Awww... I never even noticed that hehe
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Zalbor
    This is a quite popular theory, and with some evidence to support it. The "gods" came from somewhere then left, and also (I'm not 100% sure about this one) the most ancient texts refer to "beings" like Zeus and others as "kings". Only newer texts call them "gods".

    Zeus was Hellenic, not Celtic... But I getcha. The Celtic gods were more... well, heros from legend that were revered for their bravery. The majority of legend was passed through word of mouth (Bardic tradition), although unless I'm mistaken, the Mabinogion (a collection of Welsh legends) was written down in Victorian times and is still reasonably popular even today.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by MoonRat
    Zeus was Hellenic, not Celtic... But I getcha. The Celtic gods were more... well, heros from legend that were revered for their bravery. The majority of legend was passed through word of mouth (Bardic tradition), although unless I'm mistaken, the Mabinogion (a collection of Welsh legends) was written down in Victorian times and is still reasonably popular even today.
    Your right Greek and celtic legends have little in common.
    something interesting though is that the Irish leprechaun was origionally one of the senior gods/patrons of arts and crafts (lugh lamhfada; or lugh of the long hand) but was demoted to lugh-chromain "stooping lugh" and from there anglicized into leprechaun.
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    Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Posts: 16,688 Skive's The Limit
    Originally posted by MoonRat
    Zeus was Hellenic, not Celtic... But I getcha. The Celtic gods were more... well, heros from legend that were revered for their bravery. The majority of legend was passed through word of mouth (Bardic tradition), although unless I'm mistaken, the Mabinogion (a collection of Welsh legends) was written down in Victorian times and is still reasonably popular even today.
    I should learn to speak, shouldn't I? I'm not saying what I mean clearly enough... I was talking about ancient gods in general, and I mentioned kings because that's the mythology I know. Sorry.
    But if the Celtic gods had something similar (originally "heros" and later "gods") then it all points to the same thing. Haven't you ever noticed how many totally different civilisations have common legends?
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