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Spyware

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
This isn't a computer problem, so please don't move the thread :razz:

As for spyware, isn't there anything that can be done about it aside from running Ad-Aware every few days? Surely self-installing software that by deffinition, monitors what sites you go on and generates lots of pop-ups linking to smilar sites, is infringing on the small bit of privacy we have left on the internet?

Think about it, companies/sites install this sofwatre without our permission. The software then keeps tabs of what websites we visit. Surely this is illegal? If so, why has noone taken any of the companies to court yet?

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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Most spyware is downloaded in a bundle with otehr prgrams, such as kazaa, so technically you DO give permission to install it when you agree to the main program's T&Cs.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Kermit
    Most spyware is downloaded in a bundle with otehr prgrams, such as kazaa, so technically you DO give permission to install it when you agree to the main program's T&Cs.

    It was kinda obvious from the thread I wasn't talking about those ones though, wasn't it? Y'know, the self-installing ones?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by J
    There are several worms that attack vunerabilities to bring you pop ups, but failing that just install Norton anti-virus and Firewall to keep the bastards out. I know that the Goolge toolbar can prevent pop-ups, you may like to try this. Having said that it could be the front end for a Nasa supercomputer trying to psycho analyse us all on the net. So many lies.

    Nooo! I know how to get rid of and stop spyware myself, my question was surely self-installing programs that keep tabs on what websites you visit are infringing on your privacy and should be deemed illegal?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm probably miles out with this but I'm not sure that keeping a record of the websites you visit is considered personal data. Yet. So they are exploiting a loophole. I think.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Apparently some US states (gee, did ya see that coming?) have laws/are in the process of making anti-spyware laws, because it's royally pissing people off.

    Maybe it's because it's like ilegal music piracy, there's pretty much fuck all they can do because it's so widespread. Suppose they could try, but it'd take fuckin' ages to get rid of the bastards completely.

    Dunno.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by J
    *yawns having just woken up*

    Oh right. Yeah they are infringing your privacy. A nice technicality that I came up with is that if for the TCP protocol to work a signal has to be returned to the person who's spamming your machine.
    If a cable enters your home to be connected to the net then surely technicaly they are entering your residence unlawfully and stealing? This is burglary in my eyes. It's very technical but that is the case, I wonder what the law has to say about it...

    It's not because they are not physically entering your property. The law is always slower than technology. Before the latest set of legislations stealing data from someones computer wasn't theft as theft requires the person to be deprived of a physical possesion (I think). Same with viruses. They weren't illegal as you were not causing any physical damage to a computer.

    I think spyware is exploiting a loophole in the data protection act. Websites etc, are not considered personal data and so don't require explicit permission. Spyware from a website could be passed off as data gathering in the course of business.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    go out and buy this months computer shopper.
    free protection disc for six months. cost of mag £3.25p.
    have just installed it ...'panda platinum'.
    i though my previous security was good but noooo.
    have just ran a scan and found over thirty spyware progs!
    in the lat couple of hours i have had a half dozen attacks stopped.
    seems like a serious bit of gear ...firewall popups virus etc etc.
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