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Mayday rethink - Is Capitalism Evil?

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  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I have been told by work that there will be disruptions on May 1st. Traffic might be strucked by demonstrations and we were told to dress down on that day. The papers said an estimation of business will lose millions of pounds. If business suffers, the ultimate victims will be the workers. Now whats the point of all that?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    business will lose millions of pounds
    those stats are very misleading, overall business will not lose out, no extra money will leave the economy......
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    <STRONG>those stats are very misleading, overall business will not lose out, no extra money will leave the economy......</STRONG>

    Havent you seen the demonstrations in previous years? Shops in central London were forced to shut down because of fear of damage by the protesters. There were really some shops got broke in, windows smashed, etc. Cars were also smashed.

    Tomorrow they are going to march through the city. Lets see what will happen.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Toadborg:
    <STRONG>those stats are very misleading, overall business will not lose out, no extra money will leave the economy......</STRONG>

    yes it will.
    Employers will still be obliged to pay employees for time lost.
    They may be forced to cease trading for a day, which a shop like Dixons, in central London will take about £15,000 in an afternoon.
    Then there are costs associated with missed deliveries, extra police being drafted in who are paid extra in overtime, plus special bonuses for riot duties, stock markets being disrupted, and damage to property.
    In an area as influential as London, all those little things WILL add up.

    All this time, people won't be spending money, and money will be drained away from all the above costs. Meaning the economy in London WILL suffer to the tune of several million at least.

    If you scratch just below the surface, you will find that the whole thing is a lot more complicated than just a few shops losing out because they have shut.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    If you scratch just below the surface, you will find that the whole thing is a lot more complicated
    Really Whowhere and I wouldn't know that seeing as I'm studying Economics would I <IMG SRC="rolleyes.gif" border="0" ALT="icon">

    Businesses will not take in so much money on that day but I assume people will still want to buy things then they will come back another day.

    Workers will be paid - that is good for the economy, they will spend a large portion of that money.

    Things get smashed, Insurance is paid out, people buy replacements, the economy carries on going.....
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Toadborg:
    <STRONG>Really Whowhere and I wouldn't know that seeing as I'm studying Economics would I <IMG SRC="rolleyes.gif" border="0" ALT="icon">

    Businesses will not take in so much money on that day but I assume people will still want to buy things then they will come back another day.

    Workers will be paid - that is good for the economy, they will spend a large portion of that money.

    Things get smashed, Insurance is paid out, people buy replacements, the economy carries on going.....</STRONG>


    What makes you think the people coming back the next day will spend extra to make up for the day before?
    Workers will be paid, however they will have nothing to spend their money on because the shops are shut. The total expenditures will exceed ingoings for that day easily. Buisnesses will still have to pay rent, utilities costs.
    Insurance will cover damage, however what makes you think the insurance companies won't raise their premiums after that date? They do in every other circumstance.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    WhoWhere, isn't this just the economic cycle.

    I get paid, I spend it in a shop. The shop pays its staff, they pay taxes, taxes fund the NHS, I get paid...

    If McDs is shut, people will get their lunch elsewhere, if Dixons is shut people will buy their electrical goods on another day (they are hardly impulse purchases are they?) and the world will keep turning...

    Really the May 1st protest is just a chance for people to demonstrate their opposition to a system (and of course for some a chance to be vandals), that's the democratic process.

    It won't change a thing tough. Sorry guys.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    MoK said it, some businesses may lose out but the economy will not suffer.....
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Today there is someone's view on the demonstration which I thought is worth posting here:

    The lessons of the street protests of the last few years, voter apathy and the success of the extreme right across Europe are all indicative of the same thing: that governments have lost touch with the concerns of the people they claim to represent. It's time that politicians took time out to re-engage with the electorate and, crucially, started to represent them. Mainstream politicians arrogantly assume that they know what's best for us, while we, the people, are treated as fools or 'extremists' if we want anything other than what our governments are delivering. Europe needs to become properly democratic once again. That means listening to the May Day protestors AND to widespread anti-immigration sentiment. Whether the politicians like it or not, the will of the people must be heeded and acted upon in a democracy. Lest we forget, that is what democracy is supposed to do.
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