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Anyone *really* bored??

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
As part of my geology coursework i have to write a town trail leaflet explaining the building stones in very simple terms. Just wondering if anyone is bored enough to read through it and see if they understand it all. It might be hard to do without having the building infront of you though... hmm. give it a try anyway though! Please! Its hard to judge how much your average person is likely to know, and we're only allowed 1 piece of A4!
A Guide to the Building Stones of Halifax

This guide is designed to enlighten you, whether you're visitor or resident of Halifax, about the wealth of geology present right in the very heart of the town. You'll see ancient shells, and rocks from as far away as China.
Don't worry if you know nothing about rocks though, everything is simplified so that everyone can find out more about what's beneath their feet or above their heads.
All you have to do if follow the trail marked on the map inside, starting at the Piece Hall.

The trail starts at the Hatters fold entrance to the Piece Hall, and finishes within easy walking distance of here. It is easy to reach by bus (station shown on map) and their is a short stay car park nearby. A Long stay car park is located down Alfred Street East, and the train station is just off the map at the very eastern end of Horton Street.

1- The Piece Hall. This is the oldest building on our trail, built in 1779. It is made out of the local stone, still quarried in Halifax, and although badly weathered it is possible to see things in the rock which tell us how it was laid down, such as cross bedding (where the beds dip at an angle) and graded beds (with larger bits at the bottom and finer at the top.
2-The Halifax. This stands out from its surroundings because it has been covered in a glittery blue rock known as Blue Pearl, From Norway, this rock contains a mineral called Labradorite (a feldspar) and it is this which makes it sparkle so much. Now look down, and notice that the paving is also matched to the building. Impressive don't you think!
3- Lloyds TSB. The main building is the local stone, but it has special qualities which make it easy to carve and so is known as a Freestone. Two types of igneous rocks (cooled melted rock) are used on the front, the reddish one containing coarse pink feldspars, whilst the grey one contains medium sized white plagioclase feldspars.
4- Just Jenna. Can you see the cracked red panels used to clad the outside of this shop? The cracks aren't intentional. Peridotite, an Ultrabasic rock from deep within the earth, isn't stable at surface conditions and so the minerals within it alter until they are, giving Serpeninite. This alteration causes the rock to crack and weaken, so it's not really a wise choice for outside!
This and the rocks used in the step appeared to be metamorphosed, or altered by high temperatures and pressures within the earth. This has lead to the big red panels containing angular fragments held together by a natural cement, and the smaller fragments in the steps being banded and streaked, which is the result of pressure aligning the minerals in the rock.
5- Bramleys. The local stone is used to build the main building, but it has been covered with a vary fine black rock- Black Limestone. It contains many fossils of Oysters and Bivalves on the side wall, picked out in white. Some of these have been deformed by pressure within the earth, and so look like white streaks.
If you look very closely on the front you may be able to see the spiral of another shell, possibly an Ammonite. If it is, the rock can be dated to be between 206 and 65 million years old as this is when the ammonites lived.
6-Natwest. None of this building is the local sandstone- it has all been brought into the area, probably to make the building stand out. The main building is Limestone, consisting of tiny balls of calcium carbonate known as "ooliths" and fragments of oyster shells which suggests it was formed in very shallow water.
A micaceous granite is used along the lower areas of the building, so called because it contains both types of mica- black biotite and the sparkly muscovite. In the porch area is a shelly limestone, but it is too soft for outdoor use
7- Town Hall. This is a very ornate building, built in 1863 by the same person who designed the Houses of Parliment- Sir Charles Barry. The lower levels are given a bumpy finish known as Vermiculation, whilst futher up the stone is given a smooth finish known as Ashlar. Dark red lines can be seen running through the rock, and these are called Liesergange Rings. They are caused by iron oxides in the groundwater.
8- Mac Donalds. You have no doubt seen this rock type before, as it is the stone the chain uses to clad many of its restaurants. It is called Travertine, and is a calcium carbonate rock altered by algae. It is a very fine, streaky cream colour in appearence, and contains many holes which have had to be filled in to stop water getting in and speeding up the weathering process. Can you spot these areas?
9- Corn Market. The point of interest here isnt a building, though if you do happen to look up you will see many fine examples of carving, it's under your feet! The fanned setts are made from granite from China, whereas the rectangular blacks futher along Corn Market are granite from Portugal. In contrast to these, marking of different areas of the road, are buff coloured local sandstone cobbles, and along the sides are the blue grey Elland Flagstones.
10- Woolshops. The last site on the trail is also the newest. Looking at the buildings, they are similar in appearence to the other so far, but they are infact made up of the local sandstone, but it has been crushed and reconstructed, and is known as Marshallite. This is because the council wants to preserve the image of the town, and so specify that even new buildings must use local materials. Marshallite is cheaper and easier to handle than real rock.

The local rock is a medium grained quartz sandstone. It also contains flakes of a mineral called muscovite mica, and also organic material. It is a sedimentary rock, which was deposited in a delts during the Carboniferous Period about 300 million years ago. It is usually buff in colour, but is often strained red or blue by iron compounds.
Making any sense?
PS: They get a nice map with the route etc marked on in red aswell...

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    God how boring does that sound.

    Its good but what a dull subject.
  • Flake_MustaineFlake_Mustaine Posts: 1,261 Wise Owl
    Re: Anyone *really* bored??

    Makes sense to me.. BUT :
    Originally posted by faerielights
    The trail starts at the Hatters fold entrance to the Piece Hall, and finishes within easy walking distance of here. It is easy to reach by bus (station shown on map) and their is a short stay car park nearby. A Long stay car park is located down Alfred Street East, and the train station is just off the map at the very eastern end of Horton Street.

    "their" should be "there" :)

    Other than that, it looks okay :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    oops, grammer isnt my thing!

    If you think that thats boring, you should read the rest of it! 13,500 words on the use of stone in Halifax. And i am doing geology at uni why exactly??
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Re: Re: Anyone *really* bored??
    Originally posted by Flake_Mustaine
    Makes sense to me.. BUT :

    "their" should be "there" :)

    Other than that, it looks okay :)

    If we are being pedantic, it is not "there" but rather 'there,' for you are not quoting it.

    And a sentence always ends with a full stop.

    :rolleyes: :p:D:naughty::lol:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    "it is possible to see things in the rock which tell us how it was laid down"

    Is it possible to rephrase this without using the word things? It would sound more authoritative.

    "Peridotite, an Ultrabasic rock from deep within the earth, isn't stable at surface conditions and so the minerals within it alter until they are, giving Serpeninite. "

    I think this needs rewriting, the meaning isn`t clear and I had to read it three times. (And still didn`t completely understand it.)

    "a vary fine black rock"

    typo there - vary/very

    I hope that was constructive! :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I couldnt be bothered to read it!! Im really bored and cant be bothered with anything, I dont even know why Im writing this. Im off to bed cos Im tired. I just been to see 'Maid in Manhatten' if any1 is interested. Any1 else seen it?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Section 5 - A "vary" fine rock. Consider using the word "very".

    by the same person who designed the Houses of Parliment

    Consider the Houses of Parliament.

    whilst futher up the stone is given a smooth finish known as Ashlar.

    Consider further up


    It is a very fine, streaky cream colour in appearence

    appearance (is actually spelt wrong further on, too)

    Infact is two words.


    This guide is designed to enlighten you, whether you're visitor or resident of Halifax, about

    Change to

    This guide is designed to enlighten you - whether you're a visitor to or a resident of Halifax, about -

    Impressive don't you think! Is a question, so should have a question mark.

    Consider using the spelling and grammar check in Word.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by KinkyBoots
    I couldnt be bothered to read it!! Im really bored and cant be bothered with anything, I dont even know why Im writing this. Im off to bed cos Im tired. I just been to see 'Maid in Manhatten' if any1 is interested. Any1 else seen it?
    it was obviously very boring.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Originally posted by Miffy
    "it is possible to see things in the rock which tell us how it was laid down"

    Is it possible to rephrase this without using the word things? It would sound more authoritative.

    "Peridotite, an Ultrabasic rock from deep within the earth, isn't stable at surface conditions and so the minerals within it alter until they are, giving Serpeninite. "

    I think this needs rewriting, the meaning isn`t clear and I had to read it three times. (And still didn`t completely understand it.)

    "a vary fine black rock"

    typo there - vary/very

    I hope that was constructive! :)

    Very much so, thanks! Does anyone have any idea how hard condensing 13500 words into 2 sides is, and simplifying it aswell! Repeating myself i know, but i just want to get it done. Its all I feel to have done for the past month!
    :mad: :rolleyes: :eek:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It reads well. Each section is informative, and not too long. Had to force myself to read it as it's not something I'm interested in.

    Mr_Wobble ;)
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