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any idea what this could be?

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
i have just found a hard lump on the inside of my right wrist. It doesnt move when i touch it and it feels as hard as bone. there is no pain, i looked on some websites and theres one thing it could be called gongliosis, except gongliosis lumps move and mine doesnt, puzzling huh?!

i shall book a doctors appointment as soon as i can as i haev to see him for various other reasons anyway, but any ideas of what it could be would be appreciated!!!!!

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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    My mate had something like a year or so ago. She went to the doctors & it was some sort of cyst that she had to have removed. It could be a number of things though so go ahead with the doctors appointment. :)
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    thanx, i wasnt expecting a diagnosis over the net just hoping someone knew someone who had experienced summat si ilar, like you!!!!!! the info ive found is for something called ganglion cysts.....sounds similar huh!?! id normally be freaking out that it was cancer but im sure cancerous lumps move when u touch them anyway :)
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    My sister had something similar a few years ago, she had a lump on her hand, it didnt move and didnt hurt, then one day she noticed that when she bent her wrist, it moved around. She went to the docs and they said it was just a fatty deposit under her skin that had formed a lump.

    The doc told her to go home and get someone to hit her hand with a heavy book (I had the task of doing that!) and that should knock it out, and it did.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Hi Lisa J,

    We can't see you, or do tests on you, and most of the people who use this board are not medically qualified in any way.

    Sorry, but you can't get a diagnosis from a website message board. You have to see the doctor.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ganglions represent 50-70% of all soft tissue lumps in the hand. These cysts contain thick clear fluid and are usually attached to the lining of an underlying joint (capsule) or tendon (sheath). They are most common in women (M:F = 3:1) and 70% occur in the late teens and young adulthood.

    The cause of ganglions remains unknown. The current theories include (i) trapped fluid, (ii) an out-pouching of joint lining at a point of weakness, (iii) ligament strain with an impaired repair process leading to degeneration. A preceding injury has occurred in 10% and repeated minor trauma has been reported as a causative factor.

    The majority can be left alone if they are causing no pain or functional problem, as they are harmless. They can sometimes disappear by themselves. It is only rarely obligatory to treat a ganglion, for example if it is pressing on a nerve.

    A number of methods are used for treating ganglions including (i) rupture by pressure or hitting them (not recommended), (ii) aspiration by drawing the fluid off with a needle (high recurrence rate), (iii) injection after aspiration with substances such as steroids (unproven treatment with some side effects on skin) and (iv) surgery.

    Surgery involves removal of both the ganglion and the weakened area. The majority can be removed under local anaesthetic. Those on the front of the wrist usually require either a general anaesthetic (asleep) or regional anaesthetic (whole arm numb) because the surgery is more complex.

    my brother had one_ he just left it!!
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