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paying council tax on an unregistered property

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Hi, need some advice, i am currently living in an annex to a main house on a statutory tenancy agreement, council tax is included in the rent, I have found out that the annex is not registered seperately for council tax, so, should I be paying it? I have my own lockable front door, seperate kitchen and bathroom facilities and have to have my own TV licence. There is a connecting door to the main house but this is kept bolted on my side.

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It doesn't matter if the property is separately registered or not, there is still a council tax charge against the property (either as a property in its own right or as a part of the main property). Therefore yes, your landlord is perfectly entitled to expect you to contribute towards the council tax bill.

    Your TV Tax liability is different to council tax liability. For TV Tax purposes you need a separate licence for each room in a shared house if you don't live together as one household or have the TV in a communal area.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I read his question more as am i likely to end up being lumped with an extra council tax charge and have to pay the whole lot.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Hey there,

    Welcome to the boards and thanks for posting your question.

    I'm not sure of the exact answer but I did find this page on the Citizen's Advice Bureau's website; scroll down to the section called 'Properties exempt from council tax' (http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/index/your_money/tax_index_ew/council_tax.htm).

    Of particular relevance to you is this point;
    property which is empty. This means it has to be unoccupied. The property also has to be substantially unfurnished. The exemption applies for a maximum of six months and the property has to be vacant for the whole of this period (although up to six weeks of occupation during the period is allowed)

    Alternatively, you can contact your local council and they will be able to give you more information.

    Hope this helps.

    :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    If the contract says that it includes council tax then there shouldn't be a problem.
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