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What benefits can I get

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
I didn't know where to put this, so feel free to move it mods.

I suffer from myxedema - that is, hypothyroidism which requires hormone replacement. The main symptom of this which effects my ability to work is I am absolutely shattered all the time and cant really get through a day without a nap. I could probably work part time - I really want to - but I couldn't do more than that. I am looking, but the only part time work about at the moment is census and I definitely can't do that much walking. In the mean time, the money situation is pretty grim. I have no idea what benefits I am capable of getting - can I go on JSA if I'm not looking for fulltime work? Can I go on incapacity benefit if I can work a bit? I'm so confused, any advice would be appreciated.

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Evenstar wrote: »
    I didn't know where to put this, so feel free to move it mods.

    I suffer from myxedema - that is, hypothyroidism which requires hormone replacement. The main symptom of this which effects my ability to work is I am absolutely shattered all the time and cant really get through a day without a nap. I could probably work part time - I really want to - but I couldn't do more than that. I am looking, but the only part time work about at the moment is census and I definitely can't do that much walking. In the mean time, the money situation is pretty grim. I have no idea what benefits I am capable of getting - can I go on JSA if I'm not looking for fulltime work? Can I go on incapacity benefit if I can work a bit? I'm so confused, any advice would be appreciated.
    You can go on to JSA if you are looking for 16+ hours work per week and can work under 16 hours. Your benefit would be affected by your earnings.

    You can try to claim Employment and Support Allowance and you can work under 16 hours a week and still claim it, though your benefit may be affected.

    I would suggest getting in touch with your local Jobcentre and organising an appointment with your Disability Employment Adviser (you don't have to be on benefit), as they can signpost, support and advise your jobsearch.

    I'd advise that claiming ESA is getting more difficult and there are a lot of changes happening at the moment. Still, look at your options.

    If support with mobility is something you'd need, you can also try for Disability Living Allowance.

    Direct.gov tends to be a good source for this info
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You could also get in touch with your local branch of Remploy.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    To get JSA, you must be able to work for at least 16 hours per week. I was told that you must look for jobs that are 40 hours per week. When I queried this, I was told that the job must be at least 16 hours to come off JSA.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Melian wrote: »
    To get JSA, you must be able to work for at least 16 hours per week. I was told that you must look for jobs that are 40 hours per week. When I queried this, I was told that the job must be at least 16 hours to come off JSA.
    Your 'personal adviser' should work with you on this... There are allowances for people who have a disability or illness, just like there are for single parents.

    So for example, when your adviser is doing a job search at an interview on their systems, you can request that you only want to work 16 hours a week due to illness. So they could not put a job on the system for you to apply to, that was 37 hours...

    The reasoning behind this, is that it's a six month sanction if you don't apply for a job they put on the system. It would go to decision making and appeals at another office, but would be a waste of time for the adviser and appeal, if you didn't apply for a job, as you couldn't handle it due to health. It would mean your appeal would be very likely to come back 'favourable', rather than having your money cut.

    Um... I think that's what you mean Melian?

    Your adviser should not be telling you that you have to work so many hours, or look for jobs like that... :no: The department basically wants people off the register for stats and 16 hours or 60, you'd be signing up an' disappearing from the register, which is the department's aim.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Namaste wrote: »
    Your 'personal adviser' should work with you on this... There are allowances for people who have a disability or illness, just like there are for single parents.

    So for example, when your adviser is doing a job search at an interview on their systems, you can request that you only want to work 16 hours a week due to illness. So they could not put a job on the system for you to apply to, that was 37 hours...

    The reasoning behind this, is that it's a six month sanction if you don't apply for a job they put on the system. It would go to decision making and appeals at another office, but would be a waste of time for the adviser and appeal, if you didn't apply for a job, as you couldn't handle it due to health. It would mean your appeal would be very likely to come back 'favourable', rather than having your money cut.

    Um... I think that's what you mean Melian?

    Yes, that's what I mean. An adviser did tell me off - because apparently, 25 hours is too few to be working.:yeees:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You generally have to look for full time work if you're claiming JSA, but if you have a good reason for not looking for full time work this can be acceptable. Single parents, for example, only have to look for work during school hours. Medical evidence that shows you can only work part time would usually be enough.

    However I think you would probably be better off making a claim for ESA, which doesn't have the same job-seeking obligations. The changes to ESA mean that you get more support if you do want to work. The problem with ESA claims is the medical, which is usually undertaken by a doctor with little understanding of English and is often a complete work of fiction.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Thanks guys

    My doctor just called me and told me that my thyroxine levels are so low they need upping now rather than when I have my appoint ment on Wednesday. She also said that when I see her she'll sort me out with a certificate (?). What do I do when I have it?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ask her would be the best thing.

    Generally it's a case of talking to the job centre, as they deal with stuff other than job hunting.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The problem with ESA claims is the medical, which is usually undertaken by a doctor with little understanding of English and is often a complete work of fiction.
    Yup, ATOS have become real fash about the test... It's something along the lines of "can you bend over", "can you lift an empty cardboard box" ect... Meaning many people too ill to work are being forced on to Jobseekers and soon, may be penalised for being ill and/or disabled for not getting one of those elusive jobs... :no:

    However, around 40% of appeals are fruitful, so far...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Evenstar wrote: »
    Thanks guys

    My doctor just called me and told me that my thyroxine levels are so low they need upping now rather than when I have my appoint ment on Wednesday. She also said that when I see her she'll sort me out with a certificate (?). What do I do when I have it?

    I think because you're currently working, it's your employer you give it to. You'll receive sick pay then.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    So for example, when your adviser is doing a job search at an interview on their systems, you can request that you only want to work 16 hours a week due to illness. So they could not put a job on the system for you to apply to, that was 37 hours...

    I've been told that's not true. Because I've been in this situation myself. I wanted to work part-time so I could study, they told me tough. I had to look for work that is 40 hours and work for 40 hours, and study in my own time around a job, because the Tories want it that way. All because I'm not in an physical college.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    JavaKrypt wrote: »
    I've been told that's not true. Because I've been in this situation myself. I wanted to work part-time so I could study, they told me tough. I had to look for work that is 40 hours and work for 40 hours, and study in my own time around a job, because the Tories want it that way. All because I'm not in an physical college.

    That's different - you don't have an illness preventing you from working full-time. You want to work part-time - some of us can only work part-time due to illness / disability.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    JavaKrypt wrote: »
    I've been told that's not true. Because I've been in this situation myself. I wanted to work part-time so I could study, they told me tough. I had to look for work that is 40 hours and work for 40 hours, and study in my own time around a job, because the Tories want it that way. All because I'm not in an physical college.

    No, the rules are the same regardless of where you study. If you are on JSA you are expected to look for work full time. These rules have not changed for a very long time, and it has nothing to do with "the Tories". Labour, who brought in many of the welfare reforms that are now seen as "unfair" are probably delighted that you're blaming the wrong party though.

    Distance learning actually works in your favour in that you can be more flexible about when you study. If you're studing at a "physical" college you're expected to abandon your course if it interferes with a job that you are offered. At least with distance learning you don't have to do that.
    Namaste wrote:
    Yup, ATOS have become real fash about the test... It's something along the lines of "can you bend over", "can you lift an empty cardboard box" ect...

    ATOS Origin have always been arseholes, they swear blind that they're not targeted to fail a certain number of people but I think that they are. It certainly explains some of the decisions that I have seen.

    However the "limited capability for work" test that you have to "pass" to receive ESA is fair and reasonable, IMHO. The test is whether you are physically capable of doing any work, and that is how it should be. A limited capability for walking, for example, doesn't stop you working in an office at a desk. The test has been tightened up and, truth be told, I think it should have been tightened up.

    The issue, of course, is actually getting a job. I agree, finding a job with a disability is bloody hard at any time, never mind in the middle of a recession. But that doesn't excuse you from trying to find a job.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    However the "limited capability for work" test that you have to "pass" to receive ESA is fair and reasonable, IMHO. The test is whether you are physically capable of doing any work, and that is how it should be. A limited capability for walking, for example, doesn't stop you working in an office at a desk. The test has been tightened up and, truth be told, I think it should have been tightened up.

    The issue, of course, is actually getting a job. I agree, finding a job with a disability is bloody hard at any time, never mind in the middle of a recession. But that doesn't excuse you from trying to find a job.

    The rules are stupid, imo. If someone's only disability is sight loss, they go into the work related group - where somehow, they're expected to prepare for going back to work. How does one do that when their disability is only going to get worse or no better?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Without wishing to sound cruel, how does poor vision prevent you from working? There are plenty of students at my university with poor vision or even complete blindness, and if they can do a degree course they can work.

    As I say, I think they'll struggle to persuade an employer to employ them, especially with Remploy sacking a load of staff (but giving fuck off huge bonuses to the bosses, que sera sera) but that doesn't mean they shouldn't try.
  • LauraOLauraO ********* Posts: 535 The answer to life, the universe, and everything
    Namaste wrote: »
    I would suggest getting in touch with your local Jobcentre and organising an appointment with your Disability Employment Adviser (you don't have to be on benefit), as they can signpost, support and advise your jobsearch.
    Direct.gov tends to be a good source for this info

    :yes: it's definitely worth talking to your Jobcentre or Disability Employment Advisor. Also as Namaste says direct.gov is a great place to start researching online about the benefits you are entitled to.

    You may also find these articles on TheSite about claiming health benefits and tax credits useful.

    And if it wasn't confusing enough already :crazyeyes our new Government are reassessing the benefits system and will be making changes, so it's best to speak to an advisor for now who will be able to help you with your individual circumstances and will understand any changes which may effect you going forwards.
  • LauraOLauraO ********* Posts: 535 The answer to life, the universe, and everything
    Oops posted that a little too early :blush: and meant to also give you the link to some more information about Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)

    Let us know how you get on Evenstar :)
    LauraO
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