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cheaper private schools

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
When you were younger and if you had the choice to choose between a private school and a public school what would you choose and why?

I went to a private school for one year - my parents had to pull me from the public school because I was getting treated very poorly. But, when high school came I went to a normal high school and realized how different they really were. When I was in the private school I got to do what ever I felt like learning...music and art/photography...but when I went to high school the building was falling apart, so they had to cut art programs...which I thought was bull.

The point I am getting to here is that my brother will be going to college next year and my parents do not want him to go to a private school because of money, but I sort of signed the whole family up to St. Andrew’s College, Open House (the school I want my bro to go to), so my parents can actually see how much better they really are..well they are pretty upset with me, but said they would go.

I was just curious if anyone has heard of a private school that is a little bit cheaper than normal private schools? It can be overseas, an all boys school..it does not matter..
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Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    if i could afford private school for my kids id be tempted, but even though we have a fairly good household income, itd never be enough to send 3 kids through private school.
    If money was no object id seriously consider it, but at around 11k average per year per child, i think thats prohibitive.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I really wish there were different options for cheaper private schools, but in the end your childs education is what matters...that is why I really want him to go to one. But, with three children...that is nuts!...I would rather buy a house for them or save money for when they move out...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    My mum went to a very VERY expensive private school, as did my Grandad... and all of that side of the family in fact.

    My dads side of the family grew up on a council estate, my dad hated school and was a total shit.

    Who now has the better paid job? Their own house? My dad.
    Who is now snobby? And still being paid for by their parents? My mum.

    Private schools aren't everything.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    My mum went to a very VERY expensive private school, as did my Grandad... and all of that side of the family in fact.

    My dads side of the family grew up on a council estate, my dad hated school and was a total shit.

    Who now has the better paid job? Their own house? My dad.
    Who is now snobby? And still being paid for by their parents? My mum.

    Private schools aren't everything.

    Very interesting outlook..you gave me more to think about thanks :)!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I went to a grammar school which was better (results-wise) than the private school in town. Obviously not everyone can go there, but if my kids were capable I would rather they went to a grammar school than a private school.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I have never even heard of a grammar school....so I guess it is all geared towards grammer?..or
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I have never even heard of a grammar school....so I guess it is all geared towards grammer?..or

    No! It's a selective school. You have to take exams at the age of 11 called the 11 plus and the people that do the best in the exams go to the grammar school. So I guess, put simply, they are schools for the "best" performing children in the area. Based on those exams, so controversial for some people.

    There aren't that many left in the UK.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kat_B wrote: »
    No! It's a selective school. You have to take exams at the age of 11 called the 11 plus and the people that do the best in the exams go to the grammar school. So I guess, put simply, they are schools for the "best" performing children in the area. Based on those exams, so controversial for some people.

    There aren't that many left in the UK.

    wow that is pretty nuts, I guess here in Canada and the US do not have them...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i always wanted to go to boarding school when i was young but only coz i read alot of Enid Blyton books where boarding school was all midnight feasts, horse riding and hockey games. I briefly wished this again on the introduction of Harry Potter and Hogwarts, but was obviously way too old by then.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Note to the non-British - it's better to use the term "state school" than "public school", because in the UK public schools are not state funded.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I could have gone to a grammar school but there aren't any left in this part of the country. One of my best friends from primary school went to a private school and I begged my parents so much to send me too but they couldn't afford it. But I'm glad I went to a state comp now, I ended up at uni with loads of girls whose parents had paid tens of thousands for their education yet we all ended up at the same place. Having said that if I ever had the money (and I don't think I ever will unless I marry a rich man) I would seriously consider it if I had kids, depending how good the local state schools were. But I would never send them to single sexed schools.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The area around me has a lot of cheaper private schools. There's a lot of "alternative" schools that do college preparation and they're usually free if you convince an official that the area's public school system is too shitty (Not a hard thing to convince someone of)

    I've always gone to a private Catholic school and I love it. My high school has a 100% graduation rate and 98% of those graduates get accepted, and go on to university. Right now it's about 7k per year which isn't too bad for a private school.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ballerina wrote: »
    I would never send them to single sexed schools.

    ive heard that girls in particular do better in single sex schools, while boys do worse (on average)
    I would consider sending my daughter for that reason
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I had what I think looking back at it was a really good balance, and I'm very aware that I was very lucky that my parents could afford for me to do it.

    I went to a standard mixed state (of the scummy kind) primary school, and then when to a private girls academically selective secondary school.

    Through some combination of definitely having a life outside of school, travelling by public transport and having been to mixed schools first I think I came out of single sex secondary school pretty well adjusted with out much of the sheltered life/boy mad/super bitchy thing that girls schools have a reputation for.

    I'd also say that the smaller classes and more attentive staff probably kept me from going completely off the rails when things in life started going wrong. Not saying you don't get caring tutors and staff at state schools, but as around here they're generally bigger schools with bigger classes you're much more annonymous.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ive heard that girls in particular do better in single sex schools, while boys do worse (on average)
    I would consider sending my daughter for that reason

    True but I mean for the social aspect of it. I think it's important to learn how to handle the opposite sex at school. Not as is go out with them necessarily but just dealing with them in general. It was really obvious when I got to uni which girls had never been around guys before and it got some of them into alot of bother. Just speaking from personal experience.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    yeah i can see that, especially if a girl doesnt have other male role models or peers in her life. My daughter has two brothers, so it probably wouldnt be a big issue.
    I think the big thing with all girls schools, is that theres no taboo against girls getting involved in usually male dominated activities or subjects.
    In mixed schools, after puberty, its well documented that girls often steer away from boyish things while theyre trying to fit in with their peers and be socially acceptable.
    In girls schools this isnt an issue
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I went to a private all girls school for senior school and a mixed state primary - I think its the right balance because i a) didn't have the thing about not being able to talk to boys that lots of the girls i went to school with did and b) it meant that i had friends which were from all different backgrounds which i think gave me a different perspective on life.

    However when looking at schools for my daughter i'm seriously confused about what to do as the nearest state junior school to be me is a bit crap and there are a plethora of really good private junior schools and they seem to have amazing facilities - but would be my entire salary a year to be able to send her and i don't' know if it would really give her we well rounded education.

    To the OP you should investigate weather your brother would be eligible for any scholarships - but i can totally see why your parents would be annoyed i mean if they cant' afford it then they probably can't and its unfair to put them in the position of taking your brother to see something which he may end up with his heart set on and which they then can't offer to him.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Wyetry wrote: »
    However when looking at schools for my daughter i'm seriously confused about what to do as the nearest state junior school to be me is a bit crap and there are a plethora of really good private junior schools and they seem to have amazing facilities - but would be my entire salary a year to be able to send her and i don't' know if it would really give her we well rounded education.

    'State school +' as my parents used to call it?

    State school for school, because it's normal and rounded etc, and attentive parenting, good standards on homework, time spent at home with your child actually reading, dance lessons/swimming lessons/brownies/cubs/a fun private tutor once a week. That was what we did, my primary school went into special measures.

    The tutor bit was great, she was a retired teacher and Saturday mornings I used to have an hour 1:1 session with her doing reading comprehension type stuff, not like normal school work, but reading good, interesting stuff and talking about it, doing some writing on it. Worked really well for me, I loved it. I suspect because it was someone who's undivided attention I got for an hour whilst reading good stories.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I went to a voluntary controlled primary school, it was a state school but I think it got extra funding from the church because it was basically like a free private school, there were kids there that had been taken out of private school to go there because it was the same if not better. Was in a converted mill in the countryside next to woods and a lake and a river with a waterfall. Very nice school but I had the worst time of my life there due to bullying etc. It would be nice if I could send my kids (if i ever have them) to somewhere like that, hopefully without the bullying. I wasn't a fan of forcing religion down our throats either, it was a bit too extreme for my taste and put me off religion as a result. I don't think it's something that should be pushed onto young children, I was glad to get to secondary school when we didn't have to sing hymns or pray every day. But each to their own.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I travelled out of my local authority area on a placing request to a State Secondary school that was far better than anything locally. Academically it competed well with the results of the Independent Schools locally. I’m only now reading what I am at University because of the teaching at that school. They really encouraged and pushed you to your absolute maximum whereas the local secondary schools were not really pushing people and most pupils were just coasting through not really achieving their real potential. Dropout rates at S4 and S5 were high with the percentage of S6 pupils going to University was quite low in comparison to some places.

    My parents’ would have liked to have sent us to an independent school for our secondary education but their wages simply did not allow it (not all bankers are earnings huge bonuses supplementing already generous salaries!) I probably wouldn’t have done much better than I have done had I went to one rather than the school I attended.

    If I am in a financial position to send my children to an independent school I would most certainly consider it for their secondary education at least.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    My auntie offered to pay for me to go to private school, but my mum refused. Anyway, according to the most recent PISA study, once you adjust for social background, the difference between private and state schools is negligible.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    My auntie offered to pay for me to go to private school, but my mum refused. Anyway, according to the most recent PISA study, once you adjust for social background, the difference between private and state schools is negligible.
    That's a pretty massive adjustment though.......
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    might be cheaper to move house to a more affluent area and choose a state school there, especially if theres more than one child to send
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Both my parents came from working class backgrounds but managed to send both my brother and me to the oldest and most expensive public school in the country. It was pretty good a huge amount depends on where you live. Where my folks live, there is an excellent 6th form college but bugger all before that. Basically, when it comes to any future kiddies of mine, I'll do anything I can to educate them privately.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i went to an all girls school which wasn't a grammar. rough as helllllllll.

    some of the girls were pretty blokey, not in some sort of weird homophobic way but in an 'aggressive, punch, mean' kinda way.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    might be cheaper to move house to a more affluent area and choose a state school there, especially if theres more than one child to send

    Thats what i call "thinking outside the box"

    :thumb:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I went to both a private and state schools, and I was home tutored on my own and in a community group in rural devon.

    My experience of private school, was that it was very elitist, and because I was there on a scholarship, I didn't have the designer handbags and such, and my uniform was a hand-me-down from an ex-student. I got bullied because of it. Looking back I feel that although the quality of the teaching may have been higher, the roundedness of whole school experience was greatly lacking. In a state school, I did a little better and got to experience new and different cultures to my own, and interact with those from varied backgrounds. I think that is so important, and is often what is missing from private schools.

    I feel that i gained the most from being in a small home-school co-op, because the learning was far more hands on and tailored to me as I was one of 8 in the class (which was mixed ages from 5-14). Resources that wouldn't normally be accessable in a traditional schooling environment became normal and creativity was incouraged to a level I haven't even experienced in University. Homeschooling on my own was a lonely and limiting experience, but I'd seriously encourage people setting up local homeschooling co-ops.

    If I'd been able to go to any school, I would have loved to have been able to go to Summerhill (http://www.summerhillschool.co.uk/) because I feel the system would have really been beneficial for me, when I was younger. But we didn't have the money and I didn't get the scholarship, so thats life... :)

    But i think its horses for courses, different kids respond differently to different types of educational environments, some get a lot out more out of state education than private and vice versa...but how do you work out whats best suited to the child before making the decision?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I went to private school and did OK but I think I did better there than i would of at a state school but to be honest I think it also depends on the area where you live
    For example if you lived in a posh area than I think a state school there may teach better than, for example in a rough area of London where everyone is brought up around guns, drugs etc. (no offence)
    it also depends how well the teachers can control the kids I think as to how much you learn
    I think aswell private school have a head start as the majority you have to take an exam to get in so already they have the cleverer kids therefore are likely to find it easier to teach them as they already know more if you know what I mean... i dono thats my opinion & im not trying to offend anyone but I guess even if your at a really bad school if you do enough readng outside school etc. you can do well
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    playdead wrote: »
    the majority you have to take an exam to get in so already they have the cleverer kids therefore are likely to find it easier to teach them as they already know more if you know what I mean..l

    or the ones whose parents can afford extensive 11+ tutoring in advance :yes:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,328 The Mix Honorary Guru
    If the financial situation would allow then I'd rather choose to send my teens to a private boarding schools. In a private school there a re numerous advantages for a child such as administrative policies and class size, a big factor to a child's adjustment and performance in school has to do with the kind of attention their teachers are able to give the students. In addition the facilities in a private schools generally have better, well-maintained facilities than public schools.
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