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Hers/her's

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Is 'hers' right?
Anthony Ray playing Tony was given his lines in advance whereas Leila Goldini playing Leila was given hers at the very last minute

This is what I want to put in my essay but 'hers' written like that doesnt look right but I know that 'her's' isnt right either :confused:

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I googled it, it is 'hers'. Just looks weird to me
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Hers is right
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    it doesnt seem right, can you just say whereas leila was given her lines at the last minute?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    or swap it around

    Leila Goldini playing Leila was given her lines at the very last minute whereas Anthony Ray playing Tony was given his in advance
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Looks weird but hers is correct.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    aye, you only use the ' when your using two words as one I believe? like

    you are = you're
    they are = they're

    However im crap at english so correct me if I am wrong.
  • Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Warming up? Posts: 16,688
    It looks fine to me, that's how it's supposed to be used AFAIK.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    the apostrophe is used for contractions and possession. the end.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Well i thought it would come under possesion because they're 'hers' but obviously not. I'm just gonna keep it the way it is
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Isn't it ' her's '? Because the lines belong to her, and I seem to recall being told that the apostophe always points the owner of whatever is being written about and they belong to her, not hers. If that makes sense?
  • Emma_REmma_R ********* Posts: 50
    I love this kind of question!

    It looks like it should be 'her's', because one use of apostrophes is to indicate possession - so it's an easy mistake to make and lots of people do. But apostrophes to indicate possession are only used with nouns (the boy's hat).

    'Hers' is the third person singular possessive pronoun of 'her' - the sole job of this word is to indicate possession - in short, no apostrophe needed.

    What a nerd I am!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Hellfire wrote: »
    aye, you only use the ' when your using two words as one I believe? like

    you are = you're
    they are = they're

    However im crap at english so correct me if I am wrong.

    It is used for contractions like this, but also for possession - eg this is Hellfire's hat.

    However some words don't use the apostrophe for possession, most notably its. Hers is the same. There is probably a rule about why this is so, but it's ok just to learn these cases.

    People find its/it's especially difficult, but it's really not so hard - if you're talking about something belonging to it, you don't need an apostrophe, you only need it if you are contracting it is.

    (This seems an illogical rule given that we would say "this is the cat's milk", but then say "this is its milk" - but maybe it just is illogical. Or maybe there is a good reason for it that I just don't know.)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    But apostrophes to indicate possession are only used with nouns (the boy's hat).

    'Hers' is the third person singular possessive pronoun of 'her' - the sole job of this word is to indicate possession - in short, no apostrophe needed.

    Ah, this is the rule! Thanks!

    What a nerd I am!

    Me too! :heart:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Of course, the 's for possession is actually a contraction

    The original constructions were "Paul his dog", "Mary hers cat" and "the rock its moss"
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    (which is why it's its when talking about a thing belonging to it)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I love this kind of question!

    It looks like it should be 'her's', because one use of apostrophes is to indicate possession - so it's an easy mistake to make and lots of people do. But apostrophes to indicate possession are only used with nouns (the boy's hat).

    'Hers' is the third person singular possessive pronoun of 'her' - the sole job of this word is to indicate possession - in short, no apostrophe needed.

    What a nerd I am!

    :D

    I think that translates as: You don't use apostrophes to denote possesion for words like 'theirs', 'hers', 'yours' etc.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    From wikipedia:

    No apostrophe is used in the following possessive pronouns and adjectives: yours, his, hers, ours, its, theirs, and whose. (Many people use it's for the possessive of it, but authorities are unanimous that it's can only be a contraction of it is or it has.) All other possessive pronouns not ending in s do take an apostrophe: one's; everyone's; somebody's, nobody else's, etc. With plural forms, the apostrophe follows the s, as with nouns: the others' husbands (but compare They all looked at each other's husbands, in which both each and other are singular).

    I also loved this, being a grammar nerd:
    Each of these four phrases has a distinct meaning:
    My sister's friend's investments (the investments belonging to a friend of my sister)
    My sister's friends' investments (the investments belonging to several friends of my sister)
    My sisters' friend's investments (the investments belonging to a friend of several of my sisters)
    My sisters' friends' investments (the investments belonging to several friends of several of my sisters)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    jamelia wrote: »
    I also loved this, being a grammar nerd:

    I remember doing something similar at school but with handbags and princesses. :D
  • Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Warming up? Posts: 16,688
    You wouldn't write "him's", why would you write "her's"?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I love this kind of question!

    It looks like it should be 'her's', because one use of apostrophes is to indicate possession - so it's an easy mistake to make and lots of people do. But apostrophes to indicate possession are only used with nouns (the boy's hat).

    'Hers' is the third person singular possessive pronoun of 'her' - the sole job of this word is to indicate possession - in short, no apostrophe needed.

    What a nerd I am!

    Just :heart:

    In general, if you're really not sure, I reckon it's better to leave out apostrophes. Personally, seeing a word that should have one but doesn't is WAY less offensive to my grammatically pedantic eyes than seeing a word that shouldn't have one but does :yes:
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