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A visible demonstration of the political polarisation surrounding Israel

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/8008572.stm

Ahmadinejad makes a speech in which he basically says that Israel was created "under the pretext of Jewish suffering" with migration from the rest of the world to establish a racist government etc. - half of the delegates clap and cheer and half of them walk out in protest.

Is this not slightly unprofessional? That was my first thought. It's the UN, this isn't how politics ought to be done, we ought to sit down and talk. It's an anti racism conference and he was talking about the racism allegedly facing palestinians and I think his contractors walked out because he was allegedly being racist towards Israel.

It's all a political game thought isn't it? About who is buddies with who. They don't really care about the people who get shot and maimed and brought up with fear and hatred of people who are just the same as them inside.

Though this quote made me think:
"As soon as he started to address the question of the Jewish people and Israel, we had no reason to stay in the room,"
Does that mean then that Israel can't be talked about in this sort of context? There shouldn't be anything politicians have to say that is faux pas, they're politicians.

Pretty much agree here:
UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has expressed dismay at the boycotts, and the speech, saying Mr Ahmadinejad had used his speech "to accuse, divide and even incite".

Though again it's exasperating how the issue of Israel is so charged these days it can't even be brought up in a forum to talk about the issues that may very well face Israel today. I can see Ahmadinejad was trying to pull a political stunt - I don't think anything he said was actually false except the 'racist state' thing is something of an opinion as there are racist elements and laws in Israel but then again maybe they are born out of necessity - its the fact he decided to bring up the issue of Israel to try to get everyone to turn around and say how evil they were.

But right on cue, the rest of the delegates play their part in this political stunt by either walking out like idiots or clapping and cheering like idiots. I think a lot of guidance counsellors would do a better job - sit there, remain impartial, listen to what they have to say? I guess my expectations of politicians are far too high.

edit: and im a bit annoyed at the british ambassador as my (and most of ours) representative of this conference by deciding how he would represent our country and react to the speech in this 'showman' way. He has in this way represented britain in censuring the represenative of Iran and therefore also the people of Iran - who by membership of the UN have a right to speak there. It's different if he had objected and say he doesn't agree with his remarks - even if he had called Ahmenijoud a racist to his face! But to just deny him his right as a nation leader in the UN to take part in the conference because he doesn't agree with what he is saying is ridiculous. We should hold ourselves to a higher standard.

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    To be fair to the ambassador he was under instructions from his political masters to leave if anyone started spouting what could be construed anti-semitism.

    Like much of the UN the anti-racism conference is a complete waste of time and is only set up to give UN officials the chance for another freebie. If people wanted the UN to be effective they'd stick to its core mandate (International Security) plus a few other things such as UNESCO where it can make a difference.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sadly the only thing this conference has suceeded at is to deal another blow to the already frail reputation of the UN and to further reinforce various countries' opinion of it.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    :lol: More like an NUS event than the UN! (Although, at the NUS it's the pro-Palestine supporters walking out in protest at the ardent pro-Israel bias of NUS...)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    James87 wrote: »
    :lol: More like an NUS event than the UN! (Although, at the NUS it's the pro-Palestine supporters walking out in protest at the ardent pro-Israel bias of NUS...)

    I can actually really visualise that whole line of ambassadors and such going straight into spoons afterwards for an ultimate burger and several pints lol.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    This is utter nonsense. What terms did the world expect the Iranian President to refer to Israel by? By walking out like that, they only played into his hands. They were effectively saying "oh, because you think that, we're not going to talk to you. When you've shut up and start saying nice things about Israel that you don't really mean, we'll talk to you again". Idiots.

    Ahmadinejad must be laughing his head off at how weak we are.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I absolutely agree when someone says that the situation between Isral and Palestine should be talked about. Especially when you see who's in charge in Jerusalem right now, Mr. Netanjahu of whom I personally think is a great danger to the whole peace in the middle-east.

    BUT should Mr. Ahmadinejad really be the one starting this discussion? I feel quite uncomfortable talking with him about the situation although he is part of it.

    As I am from Germany I hope it is allowed to ask this question, but just imagine someone from a far right corner in Germany, e.g. someone who said Adolf Hitler was a great politician, would have started such a discussion. Would you be talking to him? There are some people in international politics that I don't want to talk to on several issues, and I personally (take care, this is only MY opinion) think Mr. Ahmadinejad is one of them.

    What do you think?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    As I am from Germany I hope it is allowed to ask this question, but just imagine someone from a far right corner in Germany, e.g. someone who said Adolf Hitler was a great politician, would have started such a discussion. Would you be talking to him?
    Yes. I would ask him why he thought the Fuhrer was such a great leader. In some ways, Hitler WAS a great leader - he knew how to communicate his message with people, he knew how to make sure things got done. However, Hitler used his strong leadership skills to set about with some of the most evil schemes ever carried out in human history - such as killing millions of Jews.

    If someone in the UK told me they thought Nick Griffin (leader of the British National Party) was a great leader, I would ask them why. I would then proceed to tear the living shit out of the arguments they had put forward.
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