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Body Dysmorphic Disorder - Help & Advice?

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
I'm going to cut out the sob story and simply ask if anyone else has this?

If so, does anyone have any help, advice, hints or tips to cope with it?

Thanking you! =]

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I don't have it but I do know someone who does.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    have you tried this site?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I know it can be a very difficult thing to deal with. And the person with it needs loads of support.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I dont' but i just read that website and my sister in law has some of the symptoms and rather worringly also seems to be portraying them onto her new born baby as well....
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    omg hi, that's the website I was looking at ealier! =]

    Wyetry, maybe it's something worth talking about with you sister?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    May I ask is it you who has it or someone you know?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Wyetry, maybe it's something worth talking about with you sister?

    I sent the link to my husband but he said that she was just insecure - but I still think she has a mild form of it - she spends hundreds of pounds a year on getting her hair chemicaly straightened when its perfectly straight already, she has a forehead obsession so had to have fringe cut in and has had totally unecessary surgery for veins under her eyes noone else could see and some on her legs. Now the worrying thing is that she has become obsessed with the fact that her daugher has a pointy head (from the ventouse during delivery) and is taking her for cranial massage even though the cranial massage man says there is nothing wrong with the poor baby head.

    But i guess she might just be vain and insecure (and has parents who seemingly seem happy to dole out money for unecessary cosmetic treatments to make her feel better).

    But i'm pretty sure she is seeing a councillor and is on AD's anyway so hopefully they might pick up on it - she certainly isn't at the not being able to leave the house stage - so i will only voice my concerns loudly if she starts doing other wierd stuff to the baby.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    May I ask is it you who has it or someone you know?

    Yes, it's me! Sorry if I didn't make that clear.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Wyetry wrote: »
    I sent the link to my husband but he said that she was just insecure - but I still think she has a mild form of it - she spends hundreds of pounds a year on getting her hair chemicaly straightened when its perfectly straight already, she has a forehead obsession so had to have fringe cut in and has had totally unecessary surgery for veins under her eyes noone else could see and some on her legs. Now the worrying thing is that she has become obsessed with the fact that her daugher has a pointy head (from the ventouse during delivery) and is taking her for cranial massage even though the cranial massage man says there is nothing wrong with the poor baby head.

    But i guess she might just be vain and insecure (and has parents who seemingly seem happy to dole out money for unecessary cosmetic treatments to make her feel better).

    But i'm pretty sure she is seeing a councillor and is on AD's anyway so hopefully they might pick up on it - she certainly isn't at the not being able to leave the house stage - so i will only voice my concerns loudly if she starts doing other wierd stuff to the baby.

    Cosmetic treatments are the worse way of dealing with any kind of insecurity, even if it's not BDD.

    Similarly, I'd keep a good eye on what she says about the baby. I don't know if BDD can work like that but it's a good to make sure that the kid doesn't get any bad vibes from the mum.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I have BDD...not officially diagnosed but yeh..:rolleyes:

    It's bad times sometimes :crying:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    piecesofme wrote: »
    I have BDD...not officially diagnosed but yeh..:rolleyes:

    It's bad times sometimes :crying:

    *hugs* piecesofme I know all about it =( just keep reminding yourself how hot you are! :thumb:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Common symptoms of BDD include:

    * Obsessive thoughts about perceived appearance defect.
    * Obsessive and compulsive behaviors related to perceived appearance defect (see section below).

    * Major depressive disorder symptoms.
    * Delusional thoughts and beliefs related to perceived appearance defect.
    * Social and family withdrawal, social phobia, loneliness and self-imposed social isolation.
    * Suicidal ideation.
    * Anxiety; possible panic attacks.
    * Chronic low self-esteem.
    * Feeling self-conscious in social environments; thinking that others notice and mock their perceived defect.
    * Strong feelings of shame.
    * Avoidant personality: avoiding leaving the home, or only leaving the home at certain times, for example, at night.
    * Dependant personality: dependence on others, such as a partner, friend or parents.
    * Inability to work or an inability to focus at work due to preoccupation with appearance.
    * Decreased academic performance (problems maintaining grades, problems with school/college attendance).
    * Problems initiating and maintaining relationships (both intimate relationships and friendships).
    * Alcohol and/or drug abuse (often an attempt to self-medicate).

    Repetetive behaviour such as constantly applying make up and often applying it quite heavily.




    Common compulsive behaviors associated with BDD include:

    * Compulsive mirror checking, glancing in reflective doors, windows and other reflective surfaces.
    * Alternatively, an inability to look at one's own reflection or photographs of oneself; often the removal of mirrors from the home.
    * Attempting to camouflage imagined defect: for example, using cosmetic camouflage, wearing baggy clothing, maintaining specific body posture or wearing hats.
    * Excessive grooming behaviors: skin-picking, combing hair, plucking eyebrows, shaving, etc.
    * Compulsive skin-touching, especially to measure or feel the perceived defect.
    * Becoming hostile toward people for no known reason, especially those of the opposite sex
    * Reassurance-seeking from loved ones.
    * Excessive dieting and exercise.
    * Comparing appearance/body-parts with that of others, or obsessive viewing of favorite celebrities or models whom the person suffering from BDD wishes to resemble.
    * Use of distraction techniques: an attempt to divert attention away from the person's perceived defect, e.g. wearing extravagant clothing or excessive jewelery.
    * Compulsive information seeking: reading books, newspaper articles and websites which relates to the person's perceived defect, e.g. hair loss or dieting and exercise.
    * Obsession with plastic surgery or dermatology procedures, with little satisfactory results for the patient.
    * In extreme cases, patients have attempted to perform plastic surgery on themselves, including liposuction and various implants with disastrous results. Patients have even tried to remove undesired features with a knife or other such tool when the center of the concern is on a point, such as a mole or other such feature in the skin.
    * Excessive enema use.



    The items in bold are symptoms I have all the time. The ones in italics are those that apply to me only some of the time or to some extent.

    I wonder if I really just have low self-esteem or if there's something more...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Common symptoms of BDD include:

    * Obsessive thoughts about perceived appearance defect.
    * Obsessive and compulsive behaviors related to perceived appearance defect (see section below).

    * Major depressive disorder symptoms.
    * Delusional thoughts and beliefs related to perceived appearance defect.
    * Social and family withdrawal, social phobia, loneliness and self-imposed social isolation.
    * Suicidal ideation.
    * Anxiety; possible panic attacks.
    * Chronic low self-esteem.
    * Feeling self-conscious in social environments; thinking that others notice and mock their perceived defect.
    * Strong feelings of shame.
    * Avoidant personality: avoiding leaving the home, or only leaving the home at certain times, for example, at night.
    * Dependant personality: dependence on others, such as a partner, friend or parents.
    * Inability to work or an inability to focus at work due to preoccupation with appearance.
    * Decreased academic performance (problems maintaining grades, problems with school/college attendance).
    * Problems initiating and maintaining relationships (both intimate relationships and friendships).
    * Alcohol and/or drug abuse (often an attempt to self-medicate).

    Repetetive behaviour such as constantly applying make up and often applying it quite heavily.




    Common compulsive behaviors associated with BDD include:

    * Compulsive mirror checking, glancing in reflective doors, windows and other reflective surfaces.
    * Alternatively, an inability to look at one's own reflection or photographs of oneself; often the removal of mirrors from the home.
    * Attempting to camouflage imagined defect: for example, using cosmetic camouflage, wearing baggy clothing, maintaining specific body posture or wearing hats.
    * Excessive grooming behaviors: skin-picking, combing hair, plucking eyebrows, shaving, etc.
    * Compulsive skin-touching, especially to measure or feel the perceived defect.
    * Becoming hostile toward people for no known reason, especially those of the opposite sex
    * Reassurance-seeking from loved ones.
    * Excessive dieting and exercise.
    * Comparing appearance/body-parts with that of others, or obsessive viewing of favorite celebrities or models whom the person suffering from BDD wishes to resemble.
    * Use of distraction techniques: an attempt to divert attention away from the person's perceived defect, e.g. wearing extravagant clothing or excessive jewelery.
    * Compulsive information seeking: reading books, newspaper articles and websites which relates to the person's perceived defect, e.g. hair loss or dieting and exercise.
    * Obsession with plastic surgery or dermatology procedures, with little satisfactory results for the patient.
    * In extreme cases, patients have attempted to perform plastic surgery on themselves, including liposuction and various implants with disastrous results. Patients have even tried to remove undesired features with a knife or other such tool when the center of the concern is on a point, such as a mole or other such feature in the skin.
    * Excessive enema use.



    The items in bold are symptoms I have all the time. The ones in italics are those that apply to me only some of the time or to some extent.

    I wonder if I really just have low self-esteem or if there's something more...

    hm...
    ive never even heard of that disorder but i follw pretty much all those symptoms...
    i just thought i had painfully low self esteem...:(
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You see I do know someone with it. But reading the symptoms it sounds very very like me. Like *Ri* said I just thought I had serious low self esteem. I am sure I do just have low self esteem. But now it has me thinking.... :confused:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Oh dear! I didn't come here to frighten anyone! :(
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I appreciate all of the helpful information that people are posting. I don't always agree with all of the opinions here, but at least people are trying to help each other out.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think BDD may be linked with low self esteem. If you consider that from an evolutionary perspective humans evolved to be attractive to the opposite sex in order to pass on their genes, and an obsession with their appearance would probably be a beneficial trait in attracting a mate so to speak. But then those with low self esteem who see themselves as 'not good enough' may constantly be trying to improve their image in order to get approval or whatever and so that could lead to BDD where they can't accept that they do look pretty and damn fine. I have a friend who would seem to suffer from it from the symptoms posted but it's hardly food for thought.

    Just some musings, anyway..
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