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Lying on your CV

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
This is something I've been pondering over lately....

What are your thoughts about lying on your CV? First of all I know it can lead to prosecution, and I'm NOT talking about pretending to be qualified to be a doctor when all you've ever done is flip burgers at Burger King. Nothing on that scale.

But for ordinary everyday jobs, like admin, office work, customer service etc, what then?

In this day and age, with thousands being laid off each week the competition for jobs getting more and more fierce, you need to be able to get one-up on the other applicants. Desperate times call for desperate measures.

Don't get me wrong I'm not suggesting it's ever justified. And I can understand if someone has worked hard for their experience only to lose out on a job to someone who has fabricated their own background. But it's clealy a dog-eat-dog age with regards to employment.

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I would have said it's a bad idea, but then apparently quite a few people do it these days, so I see where you're coming from about 'getting ahead of the rest'. I think if something was missing from my CV I would consider it (like adding some voluntary experience on demonstrating relatable skills to the job I was applying for) but as it stands I'm fairly content with my CV. Only thing I would improve is give myself A in everything instead of A/B/C spread but that's not really a barrier to entry to jobs so would be silly to risk instant dismissal for.

    I think everyone is creative on their CV...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think that you should have the skills rather than lie about them.

    But I also think that for any high-level job it would become pretty obvious fairly quickly if you had made a big lie.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Mist wrote: »
    But I also think that for any high-level job it would become pretty obvious fairly quickly if you had made a big lie.

    Absolutely, and I don't really agree with lying to get a high level job anyway.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think it's properly well bad.
    Like that film where the lady said on her CV that she was a qualified lifeguard/scubadiver and her job was to be in a tank full of water but she couldn't breathe and the director was properly raging at her.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    That's fair enough - in a job where someone's health and safety is involved then there is no excuse.

    But for 'lesser' jobs?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Meh, it's up to you I guess. I suppose you can 'bend the truth', constuing competencies that employers like to see from seemingly banal experiences, but if you play with fire, you might get burnt. Keep it believable at least.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    If you're going to lie (as in complete fabrication not bending the truth), make it something that's hard for them to research and expose you on.

    To be honest, unless you've faked teaching certificates or something, a company's unlikely to have you prosecuted. They'll more likely just force you to resign. Not that I'm actually encouraging lying on your CV.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Mist wrote: »
    I think that you should have the skills rather than lie about them.

    But I also think that for any high-level job it would become pretty obvious fairly quickly if you had made a big lie.

    :yes:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    OK I'll explain the situation I'm in.

    I tend to work in bars, usually at supervisory level. Since early last year I've been out of work after being made redundant from managing a pub, a decision made by the brewery who pulled the plug. I was doing a damn good job as I always have when running a bar.

    I've been applying for some bar jobs recently (true there aren't many about but I'm not giving up) and it feels like the year's gap is going against me. Now the job I was in above, I was only there 3 months. Previous to that I was supervising a pub owned by my aunt, I (stupidly in hindsight) left for more money and responsibility.

    Although my aunt cannot afford to take me on, she's offered to say on my reference that I worked there until very recently. Putting aside for one moment the fact that she could get in trouble for that, am I really doing that much harm by accepting her offer?

    If I do then I admit I will be lying on my CV and I take full responsibilty. But hell, I do a damn good job and work hard - I've had 17-hour days when running a pub in the past. Employers don't seem to like gaps as long as this.

    Once again, I'm not justifying my action. Just giving a perspective.
  • SkiveSkive No discipline. No morality. No respect. New ForestPosts: 15,214 Skive's The Limit
    Don't lie, imbelish! :D
    Yesterday is history
    Tomorrow is a mystery
    But today is a gift
    That’s why it’s call the present
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    To answer your specific question, if you were going for a job that required security clearance then they would check out your story. However, presuming that you are going for other bar jobs and that your bar isn't in the secret service office, I doubt that the company would investigate past asking for a reference.

    Not that that makes it right, but that's how I expect it would go.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Well if your aunty is willing to lie about the dates for you then I say go for it! It will look better than a large gap on your cv. Just make sure you have a good reason for wanting to leave that job.
  • Olly_BOlly_B Mod-u-like Posts: 222 Settling in
    Hi,

    Do bear in mind that your employer could work out your previous employment status when they get your P45 or get you to complete a P46. This is because you have to declare your previous status, as to whether you were employed, receiving jobseekers or other benefits or you weren't in employment or on benefits.

    It depends whether your payroll people spot it and whether they query it with your HR people (they could well be the same team).

    Olly
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