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Breastfeeding

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
I'm watching the programme about breastfeeding on channel 3 and it's got me thinking. Alot of the women on there breastfeed other peoples babies or allow other mums to use their expressed milk, to me this just seems a bit weird. I know years ago they used to have wet nurses but isn't you're own breast milk best for your own baby?
Breast feeding is a good thing and something that hopefully I will be able to do when I have babies, but I don't think I could breast feed anyone else's baby! How about anyone else? Is this something you could do?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I am just watching the same programme and I'm cringing at the open ness and the free spirit of it all. To see each others kids crawling to people in the room to be breastfed is just wrong. It's a mother and baby thing. Or a bottle. End of.

    I think I'm going to have to turn it over in a minute. Gawd, I'm a squeemish wimp :razz:
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    *Ashley* wrote: »
    I am just watching the same programme and I'm cringing at the open ness and the free spirit of it all. To see each others kids crawling to people in the room to be breastfed is just wrong. It's a mother and baby thing. Or a bottle. End of.

    I think I'm going to have to turn it over in a minute. Gawd, I'm a squeemish wimp :razz:


    I can understand how hard it is if you really want to breatfeed but can't, but I still don't think i could let anyone else do it to my baby!

    They are really open! I remember my sisters doing it and they would try to be as discreet as possble, these just seem to get them out anywhere!
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Those people sound like a bunch of nutters.

    Lots of diseases can be caught from breastmilk, nevermind some medications crossing over from mother to baby. Do they screen everyone?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sounds like it's just casual decisions between people. Or they have like milk banks I think. I've only been listening with an ear really.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Those people sound like a bunch of nutters.

    Lots of diseases can be caught from breastmilk, nevermind some medications crossing over from mother to baby. Do they screen everyone?

    No basically it's just relatives or friends that are doing it.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    rachie004 wrote: »
    Good for them, really!

    Why?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I found the whole thing really uncomfortable to watch. I find the whole 'giving birth' thing an alien concept anyway so I'm not surprised I was queezy at the thought of breastfeeding. I found it very strange how open they were about wet nurses - it just seems like such an archaic thing to do when we live in an age where formulas are an accepted form of feeding a baby.
    I saw a woman breastfeeding her baby oustide on a bench at Bicester Retail Village, and it made me so uncomfortable, I didn't know where to look. *shudders*
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I saw a woman breastfeeding her baby oustide on a bench at Bicester Retail Village, and it made me so uncomfortable, I didn't know where to look. *shudders*

    I understand that this is you personnal view but alot of people have this view and I think it makes it so hard for women to breastfeed!

    I remember once me and my sister were sat in a cafe and she was breastfeeding my niece. We were sat in a corner, she had her back to everyone with some muslim cloth over my neices head, but still a man felt he had the right to comment! Saying that my sister should be doing that in the toilet! It really annoyed me I ended up loosing my temper and saying "would he want to eat his dinner while sat in the toilet?!" I doubt it :rolleyes:


    After watching the programme I believe breastfeeding is something between a mother and her baby not with anyone else and I don't think I could cope with the fact my baby relies on someone else for food and comfort :no:
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I found the whole thing really uncomfortable to watch. I find the whole 'giving birth' thing an alien concept anyway so I'm not surprised I was queezy at the thought of breastfeeding. I found it very strange how open they were about wet nurses - it just seems like such an archaic thing to do when we live in an age where formulas are an accepted form of feeding a baby.
    I saw a woman breastfeeding her baby oustide on a bench at Bicester Retail Village, and it made me so uncomfortable, I didn't know where to look. *shudders*
    you are weird. Giving birth an alien concept? It's the most natural thing in the world.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    piecesofme wrote: »
    I understand that this is you personnal view but alot of people have this view and I think it makes it so hard for women to breastfeed!

    I remember once me and my sister were sat in a cafe and she was breastfeeding my niece. We were sat in a corner, she had her back to everyone with some muslim cloth over my neices head, but still a man felt he had the right to comment! Saying that my sister should be doing that in the toilet! It really annoyed me I ended up loosing my temper and saying "would he want to eat his dinner while sat in the toilet?!" I doubt it :rolleyes:

    I think the way your sister breastfed your neice was totally acceptable and healthy and should be celebrated and encouraged.
    What makes me uncomfortable, and where I think it because wrong it in two cases
    1) The child is older than say 10 months
    and
    2) The woman breastfeeding the baby is not the mother
    admittedly, I might not know in public if the woman feeding is the mother but the whole concept of a woman feeding another womans child is quite a wierd and unnatural thing which makes me squirm.

    However. Say this situation. A woman gives birth to a baby, say it is still born or dies very young and the mother adopts quickly. Would it be wrong for her to breasfeed her adopted baby? In theory, I dont find that appaling as I do number two of the above. In fact, thats acceptable because she is the primary care giver and she is supplying the baby with her milk as she would her own.

    So I guess for me it isn't about the whole feeding the baby you give birth to as opposed to the mother feeding her baby. No one else should breastfeed that baby. That is the mothers role and duty and if she can not fullfill that, however frustrating; the baby should be bottle fed.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    how is this any different from prem/sick babies being given milk from milk banks? Sorry, but i think those of you against it are being a little hypocritical if you think milk bank donations are ok
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    *Ashley* wrote: »
    The woman breastfeeding the baby is not the mother
    admittedly, I might not know in public if the woman feeding is the mother but the whole concept of a woman feeding another womans child is quite a wierd and unnatural thing which makes me squirm.

    random question do you insist on seeing a birth certificate of every baby a woman is breastfeeding to decide if you feel uncomfortable? :p
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    you are weird. Giving birth an alien concept? It's the most natural thing in the world.
    The 'most natural thing in the world'... right, so does that mean that because I don't (want to) have any instincts to mother a child mean I'm 'unnatural'? :chin:
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The 'most natural thing in the world'... right, so does that mean that because I don't (want to) have any instincts to mother a child mean I'm 'unnatural'? :chin:
    Not meaning to sidetrack this but, do you have sex or is that also alien to you?

    And if this was so wrong, then surely it would be physically impossible to feed someone else's child.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I saw a woman breastfeeding her baby oustide on a bench at Bicester Retail Village, and it made me so uncomfortable, I didn't know where to look. *shudders*

    It's going to sound like an uber radical concept, but how about just look away?

    I don't get how people can find it *that* odd for women to breastfeed or give breastmilk to other babies, but the majority (society as a whole, not just individuals here) are happy to pour juice from this on their cereal every morning, or add a bit for their tea.

    200px-Udder_closeup.jpg

    *waits for the, 'I don't drink cow's milk, I'm everything-intolerant'

    I don't get why people think it's ok to comment on moralise on how someone chooses to feed their child, surely it's best the baby is getting fed at all, and how where/who the milk comes from? Quick thought - if you find seeing someone breastfeeding uncomfortable - how do you think it feels for someone getting looks or tutted at when the alternative is to have a screaming baby (and 10x the looks and tutting for that)
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    if my baby was really young, say under 3 or 4 months, and i couldnt breastfeed myself, id rather they had breastmilk even if it was from another woman rather than formula milk.I dont feel squeamish about it at all, provided i was close enough to the woman to allow her to babysit my baby in the first place. I can think of at least 3 women who id be ok with it. Id also do it for someone elses baby if necessary and they asked me to.

    I cant imagine how the conversation would come up without making you look like a freak though.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Two of my favourite women :heart: i knew it was only a matter of time before you both saw the thread ;)
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm not saying it's wrong or shouldn't happen to me I just find it strange. Probably because it is something I've never thought about or come across before! I don't mean to judge the people who do it, but until I come across a situation like that I don't think I could personnaly allow it if I had a baby. I'd like to think that breastfeeding is something I'd do to feel close to my baby. I encourage the idea to provide milk to banks for neo-natal units its something thats not talked about enough but is greatly needed.
    I just don't think I could sit and watch another women actually feed my child without feeling jelous and inadequate I guess :s

    And I don't drink cow's milk and won't allow my children (when and/or if I ever have them) to drink it. It' not through intolerance I don't drink it I just don't see why we should drink something that isn't designed for us! Can you get formula's that don't contain cow's milk?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    go_away wrote: »
    It's going to sound like an uber radical concept, but how about just look away?

    I don't get how people can find it *that* odd for women to breastfeed or give breastmilk to other babies, but the majority (society as a whole, not just individuals here) are happy to pour juice from this on their cereal every morning, or add a bit for their tea.

    :yes: Exactly.

    Am I alone in finding that when women breastfeed, it's not that obvious what they're doing?

    I'm with Suzy on this.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I thought the programme was very interesting... my personal feelings is that the act of someone giving another child their breast milk is selfless (especially in the case of the nurse providing for the neo-natal unit, I thought that was amazing!), however I do not think I would personally be comfortable with someone else physically breast feeding my child. 100% down to my own emotions but I think it would make me feel inadequate and a bit jealous as I would feel that bond should be with me and my baby. I would consider however using someone elses expressed milk with my baby and feeding it by the bottle if for some reason I couldn't provide it.

    I do not have any problem with any of those women who chose to cross-feed, if they are happy to do it and the childs best interests are at heart then who are we to say it is wrong?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The 'most natural thing in the world'... right, so does that mean that because I don't (want to) have any instincts to mother a child mean I'm 'unnatural'? :chin:

    I was going to say "no, I don't think you're unnatural I just think you're weird" but then I thought about it some more and I have decided that yes, you ARE unnatural because the urge to reproduce is so innate in every living thing that to not want to do it is unnatural. If we didn't want to reproduce then our species would die out wouldn't it? Mind you if you were to have children I'm not sure you'd be able to keep finding unique vintage whatever else clothing for each of them. Gosh, imagine if you had twins!
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    rachie004 wrote: »
    :yes:
    The thing is, if I, or anyone else for that matter, feels uncomfortable about it or has a problem, it'd be MY problem. It truly is one of those cases where if you don't like it, then don't look
    exactly! I find it so strange that so many people seem to have a problem with it. I can't for the life of me think WHAT it is that people have a problem with either.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I thought id add my 5pence to this, seen as i watched it last night too. :)

    I don't mind the fact that women breastfeed in cafes and things and again it's one of them situations like somebody else said "if you don't like it, don't look" because if you have a baby and you have chosen to breastfeed, then obvisouly when your out the babys going to need feeding at some point, it can't just wait till you get home.

    But then again, i do agree with some of the other comments that people have said on the matter. For me personally, i would never ask anyone else to breasfeed my child because then you would be relying on somebody else for the babys food, id rather use formula, it might not be as good as breast milk but its the next best thing.

    What i didn't like about the programme was that, children of 5-6years of age was still breastfeeding, and the mothers were happy too! In my eyes, i just found that wrong, knowing that your child was at school, and then coming home and it would be asking to be breast fed.

    Although, what i did like was, where there was woman that donated milk for premature babies (not just because i was one) but i just thought it was nice that there was people out there, that would be happy to help, without getting paid like the ones America, for the gay couple. Yes, they have the right to have children ect....i just think that recording every feed and things was abit other the top. But i guess, they was prepared to give up their savings ect.....for the best for their children, i'm not saying that other people wouldn't but i guess it's just up to personal preferance.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I find it scary some people seem to think man made formula would be better then what nature provides - just some of the listed benefits of Breast Milk for Child & Mother on Wikipedia

    Benefits for the infant

    Breast milk contains the ideal ratio of the amino acids cystine, methionine, and taurine to support development of the central and peripheral nervous system. Children aged seven and eight years old who were of low birthweight who were breastfed for more than eight months demonstrated significantly higher intelligence quotient scores than comparable children breastfed for less time, suggesting breastfeeding offers long-term cognitive benefits in some populations.[15]
    The quality of a mother's breast milk may be compromised by stress, bad food habits, chronic illnesses, smoking, and drinking.[16]

    Less Diarrhea
    Breastfeeding protects infants against diarrhea as compared to formula-fed peers;[17] compared to formula-fed peers, death rates due to diarrhea in breastfed infants are lower irrespective of the development level of the country.[7]

    Greater immune health
    Breast milk include several anti-infective factors such as bile salt stimulated lipase (protecting against amoebic infections), lactoferrin (which binds to iron and inhibits the growth of intestinal bacteria)[18][19] and immunoglobulin A protecting against microorganisms.[20]

    Despite also being a factor in the transmission of HIV from mother to child, some constituents in Breast milk may be protective of infection. In particular, high levels of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids in breastmilk (including eicosadienoic, arachidonic and gamma-Linolenic acids) are associated with a reduced risk of child infection when nursed by HIV-positive mothers. Arachidonic acid and gamma-linolenic acid may also reduce viral shedding of the HIV virus in Breast milk.[21]

    Breastfeeding does not appear to offer protection against allergies.[22]

    Higher Intelligence
    Babies with a specific variant of the FADS2 gene (approximately 90% of all babies) demonstrate an IQ an average of 7 points higher if breastfed.[23]

    Less Diabetes mellitus
    Infants exclusively breastfed have less chance of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 than peers with a shorter duration of breastfeeding and an earlier exposure to cow milk and solid foods.[24] Breastfeeding also appears to protect against diabetes mellitus type 2,[25][26] at least in part due to its effects on the child's weight.[26]

    Less obesity
    Breastfeeding appears to reduce the risk of extreme obesity in children aged 39 to 42 months.[27] The protective effect of breastfeeding against obesity is consistent, though small, across many studies, and appears to increase with the duration of breastfeeding.[28]

    Fewer urinary tract infections
    Breastfeeding reduced the risk of acquiring urinary tract infections in infants up to seven months post-partum. The protection was strongest immediately after birth, and was ineffective past seven months[29]

    Fewer respiratory infections
    Breastfeeding appears to reduce symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections in premature infants up to seven months after release from hospital.[30]

    Fewer middle ear infections
    Increased duration of certain types of middle ear infections (otitis media with effusion, OME) in the first two years of life is associated with a shorter period of breastfeeding, in addition to feeding while lying down and maternal cigarette smoking.[31] A reduced proportion and duration of any otitis media infection was associated with breastfeeding rather than formula feeding for the first twelve months of life.[17]

    Less Celiac disease
    A review of the association between breastfeeding and celiac disease (CD) concluded that breast feeding while introducing gluten to the diet reduced the risk of CD. The study was unable to determine if breastfeeding merely delayed symptoms or offerred life-long protection.[32]

    Less Atopy
    In children who are at risk for atopy (defined as at least one parent or sibling having atopy), atopic syndrome can be prevented or delayed through exclusive breastfeeding for four months, though these benefits may not be present after four months of age. [33] However, the key factor may be the age at which non-breastmilk is introduced rather than duration of breastfeeding.[34] Atopic dermatitis, the most common form of eczema, can be reduced through exclusive breastfeeding beyond 12 weeks in individuals with a family history of atopy, but when breastfeeding beyond 12 weeks is combined with other foods incidents of eczema rise irrespective of family history.[35]

    Less necrotizing enterocolitis
    Necrotizing enterocolitis(NC), found mainly in premature births, is six to ten times more common in infants fed formula exclusively, and three times more common in infants fed a mixture of breast milk and formula, as compared to exclusive breastfeeding. In infants born at more than 30 weeks, NC was twenty times more common in infants fed exclusively on formula.[36]

    Possible protection from sudden infant death syndrome
    Breastfed babies have improved arousal from sleep, which may reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome.[37]

    Benefits for mothers
    Breastfeeding is a cost effective way of feeding an infant, and provides the best nourishment for a child at a small nutrient cost to the mother. Frequent and exclusive breastfeeding can delay the return of fertility through lactational amenorrhea, though breastfeeding is at best an imperfect means of birth control. During breastfeeding beneficial hormones are released into the mother's body.[12] and the maternal bond can be strengthened.[13] Breastfeeding is possible throughout pregnancy, but generally milk production will be reduced at some point.[38]

    Cancer
    Breastfeeding mothers have less risk of endometrial,[39][40] and ovarian cancer,[10][13] and osteoporosis.[10][13]

    A study at the University of Wisconsin found that women who were breast fed in infancy may have a lower risk of developing breast cancer than those who were not breast fed. [41]

    Other health benefits

    Mothers who breastfeed longer than eight months also benefit from bone re-mineralisation[42] and breastfeeding diabetic mothers require less insulin.[43] Breastfeeding helps stabilize maternal endometriosis,[10] reduces the risk of post-partum bleeding[44] and benefits the insulin levels for mothers with polycystic ovary syndrome.[45]

    Some breastfeeding women have pain from candidiasisor staphylococcus infections of the nipple[46] though these can be managed with medical attention with little concern for mother and child.

    Arthritis
    Women who breast feed for longer have a smaller chance of getting rheumatoid arthritis, suggests a Malmo University study published online ahead of print in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (See Women Who Breast Feed for More than a Year Halve Their Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis). The study also found that taking oral contraceptives, which are suspected to protect against the disease because they contain hormones that are raised in pregnancy, did not have the same effect. Simply having children but not breast feeding also did not seem to be protective.

    Bonding
    The hormones released during breastfeeding strengthen the maternal bond. Teaching partners how to manage common difficulties is associated with higher breastfeeding rates.[47] Support for a mother while breastfeeding can assist in familial bonds and help build a paternal bond between father and child.[48]

    If the mother is away, an alternative caregiver may be able to feed the baby with expressed breast milk. The various breast pumps available for sale and rent help working mothers to feed their babies breast milk for as long as they want. To be successful, the mother must produce and store enough milk to feed the child for the time she is away, and the feeding caregiver must be comfortable in handling breast milk.

    Hormone release
    Breastfeeding releases the hormones oxytocin and prolactin which relax the mother and make her feel more nurturing toward her baby.[49] Breastfeeding soon after giving birth increases the mother's oxytocin levels, making her uterus contract more quickly and reducing bleeding. Oxytocin is similar to pitocin, a synthetic hormone used to make the uterus contract.[44]

    Weight loss
    As fat accumulated during pregnancy is used to produce milk, extended breastfeeding—at least 6 months—can help mothers lose weight.[50] However, weight loss is highly variable among lactating women, and diet and exercise is a more reliable way of losing weight.[51]
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    DG wrote: »
    I find it scary some people seem to think man made formula would be better then what nature provides - just some of the listed benefits of Breast Milk for Child & Mother on Wikipedia

    .[51]

    No ones really saying that, but some women can't actually breast feed! So have to use formula as there is no other alternative. I met a midwife through uni once who was so adiment on breastfeeding the way she spoke about women who chose to use formula was shocking!
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    piecesofme wrote: »
    No ones really saying that, but some women can't actually breast feed! So have to use formula as there is no other alternative. I met a midwife through uni once who was so adiment on breastfeeding the way she spoke about women who chose to use formula was shocking!

    i was going to say something along those lines. i didnt see the programme so i dont know if there were people on there saying that formula was better, but it bugs me sometimes when people go and on about breast is best, much like the woman you mentioned, the midwife. i definitely know that its the best but some people just cant! like my cousin who is my goddaughters mother, she tried her best and managed for about a week but after that she just couldnt do it, and her health visitor wasnt very nice to her about it all, made her feel really guilty.

    when i have kids im going to try but if it doesnt all work out i wouldnt go to such lengths as getting another person to feed the baby.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    like my cousin who is my goddaughters mother, she tried her best and managed for about a week but after that she just couldnt do it, and her health visitor wasnt very nice to her about it all, made her feel really guilty.

    when i have kids im going to try but if it doesnt all work out i wouldnt go to such lengths as getting another person to feed the baby.


    Thats really awful :( . Especially as it's a health care professional thats acting that way! Both my sisters breastfed and it was really hard for them. One tried it with both my nephew's but one took to it easier than the other but she only lasted for about 4/5 months at the longest as she found it so hard. She had to write down times she'd fed and what bood she started off with as you have to alternate to make sure you get the right type of milk at each feed. My other sister lasted about 3 months but she had post natal depression and that made it difficult for her and she wasn't in the right frame of mind to be doing it.
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I didn't see the programme either, and while breast IS best if you can do it, there is no shame in using formula if you can't feed. The most important thing is the baby getting the nourishment it needs and so using formula is better than struggling on trying to breastfeed and not managing to.

    I just don't understand why people take offence to people breastfeeding - what's wrong with it?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i think more health professionals tend to push formula as the answer to all feeding problems rather than educate themselves on ways to overcome those problems in order to actually help women.

    If someone CHOOSES to formulafeed then good luck to them, as long as its an informed choice and they know the risks, but i come across sooooo many people who wanted to feed, but gave up because of this or because of that - problems they could have overcome with the right support, but all i see is the health service paying lipservice to "breast is best" but without the funding (or the inclination) to actually HELP women. Berating them for their choice is not good. Its a crying shame that most people who intend to breastfeed, give up far earlier than they wanted to because of lack of support. I was just speaking to a friend today who really wanted to but has recently given up breastfeeding her 4 week old baby because she had thrush in her nipples and was in pain. There are all sorts of ways she could have overcome it - they didnt even offer her oral canesten, they just told her to give up breastfeeding. She tried to get through to a breastfeeding counsellor for over a week before one was eventually available. Now THAT is a crying shame. So much for the breast is best campaign. Its not like its an isolated incident, and its not like the health service has anything like the funds to promote breastfeeding as much as the formula milk industry has the funds to promote their product.
    Bottlefeeding is still seen as the norm and people are so damn worried about offending people by telling them FACTS
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I certainly don't think breastmilk is this magical wonderful thing that some people suggest and I don't think formula is rat poison either. When you break it down, it's food. The sad thing is, however someone chooses to feed their infant, they're beaten with the guilt stick.

    At the Whittington hospital, I saw a sign saying that if you want to bottle feed, you have to bring your own formula 'if you choose to feed your baby in this way' - I want to breastfeed but even I felt guilty reading that! The problem with all this breast is best stuff is: are all the people promoting it going to be there at 3am when someone is wincing and can't get the baby to latch and all they want is their baby to have a good meal and worry there will be weight loss when the health visitor comes round. A friend of mine breastfed her daughter sucessfully, but at the lowest point, she was bleeding so much from cracked nipples that there was blood in her daughter's nappy. Added with a family who kept saying, "Just pack it in, bottles are fine," it's easy to see how so many people pack it in.

    My mum breastfed me for a year, and it was helped by the fact that there was my granny close by and a family of supportive people who had breastfed themselves and knew how to deal with any problems that arise. A lot of people don't have that support.

    Some people don't like the thought and sight of it, which is fair enough, but they have the choice of how to react. The baby can't help that it's hungry. The mother can't help being out with their baby (unless they should stay cooped up at home). The person watching can look away and take in the wonderful atmosphere of no baby crying in close proximity ;)

    In all honesty though, even if someone doesn't want to breastfeed for whatever reason, I don't think it's a huge crime - or anyone else's business. I think mother's beat themselves up enough without needing other people to do it for them.
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