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Finishing University - Your experiences

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Is anybody else incredibly bored of life?

Since finishing university I have gone from knowing loads of people, to being one of the only people left in my area. Nobody goes out anymore and I am going crazy with boredom and feeling a bit lonely.

I hated university, but this is just boring now and I am thinking of moving either to central London, or out of the city altogether to relocate and start afresh...

My job, I leave the house at 7:45am and get back between 7-7:30pm.... So no chance for a social life (in central London) or to keep up volunteering.

In short, life is Ok... I am just about surviving financially and have a nice boss at my low paid, but easy job. At the same time, I am really unhappy and fed up... How boring is life when you finish... I don't make enough cash to really save up and there's nothing to do in Kingston.

BUM

So what was YOUR year after finishing university like?

Boring as fuck or good or whatever?

I hate not knowing everybody, what's going on and not having a social life. :rolleyes: :rolleyes: I actually look forward to going to work because it gives me something to do.
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Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    fucking shit. cant temp and cant pass a job interview. eurgh.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    minimi38 wrote: »
    fucking shit. cant temp and cant pass a job interview. eurgh.

    You can't find temping work?

    Where are you?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Boring as fuck. I'm working part time in morrisons earning less than I need to cover bills and rent and I'm living off the bank of boyfriend. I don't mind spending time by myself in the slightest and I'm enjoying going for wanders and taking photos but I'm so damn poor it's stupid. I have good friends at work though so that's nice and I'm not lonely really. I just wish I knew how to find a graduate job or something though. I still have this same mental block when it comes to thinking of a job to do, or even where to look for one. There should be a book or something of job lists for each city!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I left uni two years ago. I lived away when I was at Uni and moved back home when I finished.

    The first year back was terrible. I was used to living with my friends, having a great social life, out all the time and always having loads of people around me. When I moved home, it felt (and still does to an extent) that I went one step forward, two back. I found it so hard being back home, especially as all my uni friends live nowhere near me and my friends from home stayed in their uni towns so I did feel pretty lonely and constantly pined to go back to living that lifestyle.

    I didn't (and still don't) have a clue what I wanted to do as a career so just got a dead end retail job, luckily made loads of friends through working there so social life has improved but recently left and went travelling for a bit and now I'm back with no job, feel like I'm back at square one again. Like you said Namaste, I think a new start would be a good idea, I really feel like I'm stuck in a giant rut!

    Things have got better as time has passed but I really need to sort out what I'm doing and just do it!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    A few things to mention about leaving uni, particularly jobs and employment:

    1) There will be a comedown, especially if you move back home. Just try to make the best of it and look for new opportunities - things will get better. Don't drive yourself crazy chasing the old good times, try to make some new ones.

    2) Now you will (presumably) have a degree - that is a degree, not a guaranteed job ticket. Like everyone else you need to be able to show employers what skills you have learned on your degree, and how they apply directly to the job you are looking for. They don't care that you've got a degree - they care that your degree has given you useful skills.

    3) Don't fall into the trap that so many people do of saying that your degree has given you no transferrable skills - of course there will be some variation in applicable skills between courses and job sectors, but think about what you have done in your time studying and how that could be applied to a new role.

    Quick example: most people give class presentations - straight away you have developed and demonstrated an ability to give presentations, answer questions and (if group work) to work together with others and combine efforts to reach a timetabled goal.

    4) Its tough out there - don't be disheartened if the first few jobs or interviews go badly or you don't hear back. If you thought you did well or made the shortlist but didn't get the job, pester them for some feedback on what you did well and where you can improve. It might take a little while but keep at it.

    5) Remember that this is not the end it is the beginning - things will get better and you have achieved something; just don't expect it to be delivered to you on a plate - its tough out there.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    YEP! its made me decide to go travelling for two years! hopefully spend a year in oz....just have to find a full-time job now and start saving!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    There's more to Kingston than you think, you just need to look for something different to the student life.

    There's a fair number of young professionals who live there/Surbiton/Tolworth and go out in Kingston at the weekends.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    There's more to Kingston than you think, you just need to look for something different to the student life.

    There's a fair number of young professionals who live there/Surbiton/Tolworth and go out in Kingston at the weekends.

    There isn't much else to do in Kingston but drink, or shop.

    There's bowling too though...

    But it is hardly the most exciting place to live when you're mid twenties.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It's only August, so not long since the end of uni. Give it some time. Is there not anything you could get involved with in Kingston to meet new people? It doesn't really seem worth commuting all the way to central London for 6 pounds an hour, unless it's a job related to what you want to do.

    Maybe you could think about doing some residential volunteering, it could give you some inspiration and work experience?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    katchika wrote: »
    It's only August, so not long since the end of uni. Give it some time. Is there not anything you could get involved with in Kingston to meet new people? It doesn't really seem worth commuting all the way to central London for 6 pounds an hour, unless it's a job related to what you want to do.

    Maybe you could think about doing some residential volunteering, it could give you some inspiration and work experience?

    I used to volunteer a lot, it's just my long work hours make it impossible.

    Still... am looking for a new job :):)

    Was just wondering if being so bored is normal
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Well your mind probably isn't being stimulated any more the way it was at uni.

    If you're in a boring job, it's kind of inevitable....my new thing is to listen to audiobooks on my MP3 player on public transport.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I graduated in May and life's been on an upswing since! All the stuff I put off due to being skint and focusing on passing I'm now getting done. :yippe:

    I worked like a mofo this summer so I didn't really have much time to burn, but in August I took a 5 week dance course which I've wanted to try for years.
    This winter I've got several plans, I want to do more dance, and perhaps either play volleyball or see if my local pool has swimming lessons for 'oldies' to participate in for the fun of it.
    I'm also going to Berlin in September, I'll get my horse back in December. Also, I can now meet my friends without worrying about being skint, invite them for a meal or something.

    I need quite a lot of stimulation to not get bored and lazy, there are days where I'm bored out of my mind (I work shifts so not many people to harass on Tuesdays for example) so I've had to get creative with things to occupy myself with. My two favorites now are mountain biking and cross stitching.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    In total agreeance with you on this subject. Finished Uni this year and moved home to friends I no longer can tolerate who have failed to grow up at all. Top that off I broke up with my Uni girlfriend as we barely see each other and thats really getting me down.

    Jobs are hard come by but somehow I'm working in a boring job as an IT Tech until I decide what I want to do!

    Why is life so shite!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Finished Uni this year and moved home to friends I no longer can tolerate who have failed to grow up at all. Top that off I broke up with my Uni girlfriend as we barely see each other and thats really getting me down.

    Pretty much what happened to me but it has got better!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It was fairly crap. Had to move out of my flat into 2 crap shared houses/flats since May 2007. Have a shitty temp job that I hate but keep doing because the money is good (although I do finish on Friday!). I had a VERY busy life and social life at uni which hs died down a lot. I think it takes a while though, soon I'll be starting on a graduate scheme so things will pick up. I think it just takes a while to get things off the ground.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I've said it before elsewhere on the boards, but its true, its not till you leave uni that you realise what a stupidly good set up it really is. You dont have to worry that much, you dont have to act like a full adult yet get all the freedom.

    Personally I took a bit of a nose dive after I left (shitty job) but its got better since then, if I could only sort out my love life I'd be sorted.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Finishing University - Your experiences

    Hi Namaste,

    I think everyone's responses show leaving uni and going either back home or living a completely different life than you did at uni - and starting work, especially if the work you're doing isn't really what you want to do, is really hard! So don't feel like you're alone as I think every student goes through this.

    I myself had the same experience when I left uni and came back to live with my parents. I think the important thing to remember is that like anything, it is an adjustment that takes time. Things will get better, it has for me and the key is not to pine for your old life but to look forward and build your new life the way you want it - what do you want your life to be like? Work gradually towards that, if its at all possible.

    This link http://www.thesite.org.uk/workandstudy/gettingajob/graduates/finishedwhatnext gives some help and advice about the adjustment after uni to your life afterwards and might be helpful to you.

    Let us know how you get on!

    Lisa
    :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm sat here, the day after my 23rd birthday, looking at the clock and dreading going in. I get home at 7pm and if I go out all I can do is think "I have to get up in the morning."

    I'm poor and I'm not feeling particularly fulfilled in my new job but everywhere else I apply I just get rejected. I'm thinking, is this how my life is? Where do I go from here, from day to day, wage packet to wage packet and I'm just like... I spend all my life in work.
    BLAH
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I finished uni this year too and now have a well-paid job but I am so bored it's untrue. Am really missing uni for being stretched academically and being with people that have similar interests to me.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    budda wrote: »
    I've said it before elsewhere on the boards, but its true, its not till you leave uni that you realise what a stupidly good set up it really is. You dont have to worry that much, you dont have to act like a full adult yet get all the freedom.

    Personally I took a bit of a nose dive after I left (shitty job) but its got better since then, if I could only sort out my love life I'd be sorted.

    Word.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The only way to get out of the post-uni, back home, lonely/can't find a solid job rut is to really have a think and focus on exactly what you want.

    I know it's hard, but you really have to be pro-active about it. Think what you want in a career, talk to people, read books, search the internet, read all the job sections in papers to give you ideas, think what you're good at etc. There's so many jobs out there, and work is gonna be a big part of your life so it's important to find something you enjoy. Even if you go for interviews for jobs you're not sure you really want, it gives you an insight into certain elements of jobs and raises confidence/experience.

    Once you have a job which pays a bit more money, have you thought about moving more central in London? I'm never short of things to do here, I love it. Admittedly I still struggle with money, even though I'm on a pretty good wage for a graduate, but I wouldn't change it. I don't think I'd feel like that if I didn't have a job I loved.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Wow. I couldn't have had it more different. I felt university sucked and the real world is awesome, and most my friends would definitely agree.

    I was at Imperial College. Ranked 4th in the country but a bit of a shithole - 70% male and filled up with gimpy geeks from China/India with no social skills. Plenty of pressure to do lots of extracurriculars, get internships / placements etc, so there was no rest for the wicked.. the entire 4yrs I never once felt I could properly chill out and relax cos there was always something on the back of my mind that needed doing - more project work, another job interview etc.

    Now step forward to the real world. Straight after graduating we all got graduate jobs in London - as did a lot of my schoolfriends who'd gone across the country for uni. For most of us this meant fixed hours of work, so every evening / weekend we can properly enjoy ourselves not having to worry there's other stuff that we need to be getting on with. Most of us love our jobs and got a buzz from being at prestigious, well-respected firms, as well as having enormous amounts of responsibility at such a young age. Those that didn't like their jobs quickly changed sectors and now nobody is lumbered with a job they don't like. Best of all we went from relatively skint students (£4k loans and £10k/yr living costs in London) to suddenly all earning around £25-30k (and more for my friends in banking), so could properly enjoy life - getting VIP tables at the top clubs and suddenly being able to attract higher quality girls, going on better holidays than 3* Spain/Ibiza trips, not having to worry about a few quid this way or that for taxis and meals. etc

    I think the difference between my experience and many posts here is (a) we all had our graduate jobs lined up before graduating by applying in our final year, (b) we're nearly all in the same place (London) so the social life has kept up.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    tinkler wrote: »
    £25-30k
    How fast does that figure go up? And to what level if you don't mind me asking?

    I just expected people from Imperial to earn more. Don't get me wrong, I know its a lot of money, but expected it to be a bit steeper than that.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Dear Wendy wrote: »
    How fast does that figure go up? And to what level if you don't mind me asking?

    I just expected people from Imperial to earn more. Don't get me wrong, I know its a lot of money, but expected it to be a bit steeper than that.
    The Imperial average starting salary is only £24k - and is highest in the country. However, these graduate starting salaries go up enormously quickly - go to Accenture and you start on just £28k, but after 2yrs that is £45k and bonuses. Nothing seems to go up quicker than banking though - your £35-40k starting salary becomes £60k after 2 years, with an annual bonus easily £100k on top for the better desks 2yrs in. Slightly annoyed I didn't go down that route rather than tech, my friends have already paid off their mortgage on £300-400k flats by age 25-26!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Well seems as it advances pretty quickly into good money. But yeah, for excessive amounts of money banking is definitely the way forward.
    If I am not mistaken LSE has the highest average of starting graduate salary at around £28 or 29 grand.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Dear Wendy wrote: »
    Well seems as it advances pretty quickly into good money. But yeah, for excessive amounts of money banking is definitely the way forward.
    If I am not mistaken LSE has the highest average of starting graduate salary at around £28 or 29 grand.
    I remember a few yrs ago Imperial was top with £24k, things have certainly changed since, this is from The Sunday Times 2007 guide -

    Chat_211642a.gif

    These numbers are deceptively low though, as they exclude golden handshake / sign-on bonus (£5-8k for top grad firms), end of year performance bonuses (can be 100% of salary in banking), company cars etc.. so LSE and Imperial these days are in fact over £30k average.. note I graduated a few years ago when £25-30k was the norm except for banking.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Well I guess LSE produces a lot of the people working in the major banking firms, and that's definitely what drags the average up. The finance courses and the like are around 3 or 4 grand more expensive than the majority of other grad courses at the school. So I assume they basically know that these people are going to reap it once they're done, so the school might as well get something out of it whilst they can.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yep. What do you do btw, student in London? Going for a grad scheme?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Doing a grad course in London starting October. And yeah, from there I will hopefully nail a job that is both interesting and well paying - if such one exists.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Pink Soda wrote: »
    Once you have a job which pays a bit more money, have you thought about moving more central in London? I'm never short of things to do here, I love it. Admittedly I still struggle with money, even though I'm on a pretty good wage for a graduate, but I wouldn't change it. I don't think I'd feel like that if I didn't have a job I loved.
    I am going to once my contract runs out.

    I am on piss poor wages... I am living in an expensive part of greater London. I hate it. Kingston and the surrounding areas just seem quite snooty and there's nothing to do.

    Still, get a better job... Don't mind working long hours if it means having to be in K-town less.
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