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Return to education?

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Hi All,

Not been on the boards for about 6 months but hey, I know this is a great place to get advice and different opinions.

Im currently 22 (23 in August), and I am contemplating going to Uni.

Since college I have worked full time, coming up to 5 years now. Im used to having money and being able to go out and generally live a nice wealthy life.

I want to move into web development but all the jobs require experience in that field and you dont seem to get any "junior" roles without experience. However there are quite a few jobs around for recent graduates.

My question is, should I pack my job in (which i forgot to mention im not very fond of) to go to Uni full time and get a degree?

Does anyone have any other ideas/suggestions?

Many thanks,

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Phoenix_ wrote: »
    Does anyone have any other ideas/suggestions?
    you could do a degree part time or by distance learning...
    that way you get the best of both worlds! :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    There are very little part time degrees in my area, and im not enjoying my job,

    Ive decided to go to uni. Im quite worried already as I have some finacial commitments already which could be hard to deal with when not earning. We'll just have to see i suppose.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You may be able to get a grant which would help with those financial commitments.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    squeal wrote: »
    You may be able to get a grant which would help with those financial commitments.
    He almost certainly would. According to him, he's been working for five years. That would mean he qualifies as an independent student under the financial help system. One check with the Student Loans Company should confirm that.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    squeal wrote: »
    You may be able to get a grant which would help with those financial commitments.

    they have to be judged to be essential financial commitments... not things like paying for your car and the like.
    SG - being an ''independent student'' does not automatically qualify you for any grant.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    otter wrote: »
    they have to be judged to be essential
    SG - being an ''independent student'' does not automatically qualify you for any grant.

    It may do because instead of the income being assessed on how much your parents earn it is assessed on how much you have earnt if you can prove it my wage slips or whatever. If Phoenix earns about £20k then the chance of receiving a decent grant are pretty high. They aren't going to know what the grant will be spent on. If his financial commitments are a car then there is nothing stopping him using the grant on that if it helps.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Hey all,

    Thanks for the replies, ive been doing some digging and gonna be applying for some loan things soon i guess.

    It is for my car but i also had to take a loan out a while ago to help with other things which unfortunately i am still paying for.

    Cheers again! :thumb:

    p.s. squeal im a bloke :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Phoenix_ wrote: »
    Hey all,

    p.s. squeal im a bloke :)


    Sorry, I always forget, changes have been made :)
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    otter wrote: »
    SG - being an ''independent student'' does not automatically qualify you for any grant.
    Being a "student" doesn't automatically qualify you for any grants either, but I don't hear you shouting about that. :p
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    stargalaxy wrote: »
    According to him, he's been working for five years. That would mean he qualifies as an independent student under the financial help system.

    :confused: No it doesn't. According to various uni websites, you're classed as a independent student if you haven't been living with your parents for 3 years or something.
    You are an independent student if, at the start of the academic year for which you are applying for support, you are aged 25 or over, have care of a child or children, are married or in a civil partnership, have supported yourself for at least three years, or you have no living parents.

    From http://www.studentfinancedirect.co.uk/portal/page?_pageid=53,1260694&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    If you're over 21 or have been finantially independant for the last 3 years you're classed as a mature student.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Melian wrote: »
    :confused: No it doesn't. According to various uni websites, you're classed as a independent student if you haven't been living with your parents for 3 years or something.
    Er, the quote that you provided said that one of the conditions for being classed as an independent student was that you "have supported yourself for at least three years". Duh. :p
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I've bene writing my personal statement, but i think its really short, its like a 1/4 of what the max is.
    My GF thinks its fine as its clear and to the point.

    As i have done this all on my own what sort of advice did people get from tutors / friends etc?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    A short personal statement is better. Let's face it, it takes less time to read. Admissions tutors will, over the next few months, be bored into submission by meaningless personal statements that drone on and on forever about students wanting "challenges", saying it's their "dream" and various other bits of crap. If yours is short and to the point, all the better for everyone. Takes you less to write, takes them less to read, means they can come to a decision more quickly. Since you're 23, your chances of being allowed onto the course are very high as it is.
    Phoenix_ wrote: »
    As i have done this all on my own what sort of advice did people get from tutors / friends etc?
    The only person whose advice I really listened to was my former English tutor when I was doing my A-Levels. Other people gave advice, I just didn't have the heart to tell them I didn't want it.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    1/4 of what the maximum is fairly short though. what topics have you covered in it? you could probably expand a bit on all of them...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Kat_B wrote: »
    1/4 of what the maximum is fairly short though. what topics have you covered in it? you could probably expand a bit on all of them...
    I wrote my personal statement all the way back in 2005 now, but if I remember correctly, this was the basic structure of how I did it;

    (1) Who I am, why I want to go to university.
    (2) Why I want to study that particular subject.
    (3) Detail hobbies/interests that are relevant to subject, or any previous jobs if related.
    (4) What I wanted to do after getting my degree.

    I suspect that the reference counts for more, truth be told. My personal statement was absolutely dreadful. Luckily, my reference was written beautifully. As it should have been, coming from an English tutor. :p
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    **dunno if i should/am allowed to***

    But here is my statement...

    I have decided to study web development to further my knowledge of the subject and industry because I wish to pursue this as a career. Currently I have three years of information technology experience, and recently moved into a new role as a webmaster for a blue chip company. Whilst the new role is a step in the right direction, it does not give me the opportunity to learn the technical aspect of development due to agencies being responsible for the creation of content.

    While it would be beneficial for me to stay in full time employment and take a part time course, the courses available did not seem to be very relevant for my career path. I am particularly interested in learning multiple programming languages and their applications as well as the whole development cycle. After looking at various courses and their modules, I have chosen this course as it is the most appealing and covers all of the subject areas I wish to study.

    After graduating I plan to work for a development agency so that I can be continuously challenged and gain invaluable experience of the industry. During this period I will aim to build up my portfolio. In a later stage I hope to be successful enough to start my own business.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i would expand on why you want to studey web development - yes because you want to persue it as a career but what exactly about it makes you want to persue it as a career - what do you like about it etc.

    expand on your work experience - three years is a lot so definitely make a big thing of it - maybe talk about the roles you've had, what you did, what you liked.

    i think its perfectly fine as the basis - just expand on everything and maybe sound a bit more enthusiastic!
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